Halleck's International Law: Or, Rules Regulating the Intercourse of States in Peace and War, Volum 2

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C. K. Paul & Company, 1878
 

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Continguts

Declaration of the Conference of Paris in 1856
14
Privateers by whom commissioned
15
Treaty stipulations respecting privateers
16
Implements of
17
Use of poisoned weapons
18
Effect of general notoriety
19
Poisoning wells food
20
Surprises
21
Allowable deceptions
22
Stratagems
23
Use of a false flag at
24
Deceitful intelligence
25
Employment of spies
26
Cases of Hale and André
27
Rewarding traitors
28
Intestine divisions of enemys subjects
29
Disregard of warning
31
Duration of offence
37
12
59
CHAPTER XX
68
When each belligerent supports its own prisoners
87
May prisoners of war be put to death
88
Useless defence of a place
90
Sacking a captured town
91
Remarks of Napier
92
Fugitives and deserters found among prisoners of war
93
Rule of reciprocity
94
Limits to this rule
95
CHAPTER XXI
96
The real property of a belligerent State
98
Title to such property acquired during war
99
Documentary evidence of debts
102
Public archives
103
Public libraries and works of art
104
Civil structures and monuments
106
Private property on land
108
Penalty for illegal acts
109
War in the Spanish peninsula IIO 17 Mexican war III
113
Property taken on field of battle or in a siege
114
All booty primarily belongs to the State
115
10
116
Useless destruction of enemys property
117
Rule of moderation
118
Questions of booty
119
Ancient courts of chivalry
120
English law respecting booty
121
CHAPTER XXII
124
Opinions of Mably and others
125
21
154
If condemned in captors country
173
CHAPTER XXV
211
CHAPTER XXVI
244
PARA PAGE 16 Ancient treaties and ordinances
253
Modern treaties and ordinances
255
Conflicting decisions of prize courts
256
Implements and munitions of war
257
Unwrought articles
258
Intended use deduced from destination
261
Provisions
262
Preëmption
263
Contested by other nations
264
CHAPTER XXVII
267
British claim of a right of visit in time of peace
268
Opinions of American publicists
270
Of continental writers
271
Of Lord Stowell and Sir R Phillimore
273
Distinction between pirates and slavers
276
Great Britain finally renounces her claim of right of visit
277
Visitation and search in time of war
282
English views as to extent of this right
283
Views of American writers
284
Force may be used in the exercise of this right
285
But must be exercised in a lawful manner
286
Penalty for contravention of this right
287
English decision as to effect of convoy
288
Use of false papers
299
Impressment of seamen from neutral vessels
300
American rule as defined by Webster
302
Violation of Neutral Duties
305
20
330
22
336
2
340
PARA PAGE 13 When and how revoked
353
Cartels for prisoners
354
Cartel ships
355
Their rights and duties
356
Ransom of captured property
358
If ransom vessel be lost or stranded
359
Hostages for captures and prisoners
360
Suits on contracts of ransom
361
CHAPTER XXX
364
General licences
365
Special licences
366
Want of uniformity in British decisions
367
Representations of the grantee
368
Persons entitled to use them
369
Where the principal acts as agent for others
370
Character of the vessel
371
Change of national character during voyage
372
Protection to enemys goods
373
Licence to alien enemy
374
If cargo be injured
375
Compulsory change of cargo
376
Change of port of destination
377
Time limited in licence
378
If not on board or not endorsed
379
Of captures generally
380
23
411
CHAPTER XXXIII
444
Effect of this distinction
457
American decisions
458
Powers of the President respecting such revenues
459
Change of ownership of private property during military occupation
460
Laws relating to such transfers
461
Allegiance of inhabitants of occupied territory
462
Lawful resistance and insurrection
463
Implied obligation of the conquered
464
Right of revolution
466
Historical examples
468
Alienations of territory occupied by an enemy
469
29
480
30
485
32
494
CHAPTER XXXV
512
Upon moveables on land
516
Towns and provinces
517
Release of a subjugated State
520
Case of Genoa in 1814
521
Textwriters and prize courts
522
Rights of postliminy modified by treaties and municipal laws
523
Laws of Great Britain and United States
524
Setting forth as a vessel of war
527
10
528
Quantum of salvage on recaptures
530
Recapture of neutral property
531
International law on salvage
532
Military and civil salvage
533
79
535
In case of ransom
536
From pirates
537
By land forces in foreign ports
538
34
541
Proclamation of Neutrality by Great Britain 1877
551
Earl Derbys letter to the Treasury and other Departments 1877
553
International Courts in Egypt
555
Territorial Waters of the British Empire
559
II
567
12
579
81
585

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Passatges populars

Pàgina 219 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Pàgina 16 - Privateering is and remains abolished; 2. The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4.
Pàgina 492 - ... to the United States by this treaty shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, as soon as may be consistent with the principles of the Federal Constitution, and admitted to the enjoyment of the privileges, rights, and immunities of the citizens of the United States.
Pàgina 185 - A neutral Government is bound — " First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Pàgina 186 - And whereas the privilege of exterritoriality accorded to vessels of war has been admitted into the law of nations, not as an absolute right, but solely as a proceeding founded on the principle of courtesy and mutual deference between different nations, and therefore can never be appealed to for the protection of acts done in violation of neutrality...
Pàgina 17 - And that the private property of the subjects or citizens of a belligerent on the high seas shall be exempted from seizure by public armed vessels of the other belligerent, except it be contraband.
Pàgina 540 - He shall be guilty of an offence against this Act, and shall be punishable by fine and imprisonment, or either of such punishments, at the discretion of the court before which the offender is convicted; and imprisonment, if awarded, may be either with or without hard labour.
Pàgina 349 - I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit : Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy to be given to an officer...
Pàgina 36 - As martial law is executed by military force, it is incumbent upon those who administer it to be strictly guided by the principles of justice, honor, and humanity — virtues adorning a soldier even more than other men, for the very reason that he possesses the power of his arms against the unarmed.
Pàgina 455 - Martial rule can never exist where the courts are open, and in the proper and unobstructed exercise of their jurisdiction. It is also confined to the locality of actual war.

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