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AN ENGLISH-LATIN LEXICON.

FOUNDED ON THE GERMAN-LATIN DICTIONARY OF DR. C. E.

GEORGES, BY REV. J. E. RIDDLE, M.A., AND REV. T. K. ARNOLD, M.A. FIRST AMERICAN EDITION, CAREFUL

LY REVISED, AND CONTAINING A OPIOUS DIC

TIONARY OF PROPER NAMES FROM THE

BEST SOURCES,

BY CHARLES ANTHON, LL. D.

ROYAL 8vo, SHEEP EXTRA, $3 00.

Among all the books in the field of classical literature, we speak from some experience, there is not one more useful, necessary, and valuable, than this lexicon.--Literary World.

This new English-Latin Lexicon, like Liddell and Scott's Greek, and Freund's Latin Dictionaries (Andrews's Latin-English Lexicon), will nec. essarily supersede all other works of the same class, and for the same reason-its superiority.-Methodist Quarterly Review.

It is the only English-Latin dictionary that a student can consult with a reasonable hope of finding what he wants, or with any certainty of being able to trust what he finds.-Sariain's Magazine.

The best work of the kind ever published, and destined to supersede the use of every other English-Latin dictionary.-Holden's Review.

The most copious and the best arranged of its kind that we have ever seen.-National Intelligencer.

It is a noble, an invaluable contribution to classical literature and to the cause of classical education generally.-Commercial Advertiser.

Destined to take pre-eminent rank among the improved educational books of the present age.- Washington Union.

The work displays great research, and must be invaluable to the classical reader.--Rochester Democrat.

An invaluable work for the student of Latin, in method, fullness, and clearness.--Churchian.

It must supersede every similar work now in use in schools and colleges throughout the United States, as it has already done in England.-Courier

Of immense use to those who are learning to write Latin.-Puritan Rec:

Superior to any thing of the kind. There is no such thesaurus of Latin equivalents for English expressions ; all others are meager in the comparison. Christian Intelligencer.

This work supplies every former deficiency, and must find its way at once into the hands of every teacher and pupil.--American Spectator.

This is a work such as never before appeared in the English language.Freeman's Journal.

HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK,

Valuable Text-Bunk fur örhools and Colleges.

E L E M ENTS OF

NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.

DESIGNED AS A TEXT-BOOK FOR ACADEMIES, HIGH-SCHOOLS,

AND COLLEGES.

BY ALONZO GRAY, A. M.

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Xllustrated by Three Dundred and Sirty Wood-Cuts.

12MO, MUSLIN, 70 CENTS; SHEEP, 75 CENTS.

Well suited to win the confidence of the public, and to sustain the reputation of the author. It embodies a compend of the latest researches of modern science in Natural Philosophy, and preserves a just medium between more learned and voluminous treatises, and barren and profitless abstracts. Rev. LYMAN COLMAN, D.D.

From the particular attention I formerly bestowed upon some sheets of the work, I think you have very successfully prepared a book to occupy the medium place between the larger and the more elementary works now in use as text-books, as you designed to do. The analysis prefixed to each section, after the manner of Dr. Arnott, is an excellent feature of the work. I am glad to see that you have introduced so many facts and principles of modern science, and have given the pupil the opportunity to apply his knowledge as he acquires it to the solution of numerical questions.-E. S. SNELIU, Professor of Natural Philosophy, Amherst College.

I regard it as superior both in matter and arrangement to any other elementary work on the subject with which I am acquainted.-W. H. WELLS, Putnam Free School, Newburyport, Mass.

It shows every where the marks of thorough working out, and that with a definite view to practical use in the school-room.--Meth. Quar. Review.

It is a clear, compact, well-conceived, and well-executed treatise, lucid in style, simple in design and arrangement. We cordially recommend it to schools and teachers generally, as a suitable text-book for studies in this department.-Congregationalist.

We regard the book as admirably adapted for academies and high-schools. -Watchian and Observer.

Its lucid arrangement, the variety and force of its illustrations, and the even flow and simplicity of its style, are admirably adapted to make this volume not only an excellent manual for teachers, but a valuable book of reference for every class of readers who wish to keep up with the scientific improvements of the day. New York Tribune.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK.

i

A SYSTEM OF ANCIENT AND

MEDIÆVAL GEOGRAPHY, ,

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

BY CHARLES ANTHON, L L. D.

8vo, MUSLIN, $1 50; SHEEP, $1 75. It will be seen that the book is a history as well as a geography. The two are, in truth, happily combined. This renders the work something more than a dry enumeration of geographical details ; it may be read with the same pleasure as one, anxious for information, would read a history. The work is every where instinct with life: it is, in fact, geography historically treated. It contains, besides, much curious and instructive information on points of knowledge concerning which we are accustomed to search elsewhere, and often to search in vain.-S. W. Baptist Chronicle.

Those who have attempted to teach Greek and Latin literature, know that a good and complete system of classical geography has been among the absolute wants of American schools and colleges. The work before us is meant precisely to fill the gap; and it takes up the subject in the exhaustive way in which Dr. Anthon generally treats the subjects he undertakes to discuss.Methodist Quarterly Review.

It is well done, and we do not know of a work in the English language that could be substituted for it in the department to which it belongs.-Puritan Recorder.

Of the many volumes for which the public are indebted to Dr. Anthon, there is not one more admirably executed, in all respects, than this. Every page evinces the most thorough discrimination.—New York Tribune.

The work is a monument of the learning and the unwearied diligence of the author.-Sartain's Magazine.

Invaluable to the traveler and the student.-Democratic Review.

A CLASSICAL ATLAS, TO ILLUSTRATE ANCIENT GEOGRAPHY,

COMPRISED IN TWENTY-FIVE MAPS, SHOWING THE VARIOUS DI

VISIONS OF THE WORLD AS KNOWN TO THE ANCIENTS.

WITH AN INDEX OF THE ANCIENT AND MOD

ERN NAMES.

BY ALEXANDER G. FINDLAY, F.R.G.S.

8v0, HALF ÁOUND, PRICE REDUCED TO $3 25.

2

Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature.

L'étendue des recherches, le goût et la sureté des appréciations littéraires, lui donnent un prix tout spécial.-BRUNET in Le Bulletin Belge;"' Bruxelles.

Mr. Ticknor's history is conducted in a truly philosophical spirit. Instead of presenting a barren record of books-which, like the catalogue of a gallery of paintings, is of comparatively little use to those who have not previously studied them-he illustrates the works by the personal history of their authors, and this, again, by the history of the times in which they lived; affording, by the reciprocal action of one on the other, a complete record of Spanish civilization, both social and intellectual.-N. American Review.

These volumes on Spanish literature, which it is but moderate praise to say are far superior to any thing that has gone before them, in wideness of range, depth of learning, and thoroughness of research, quite absolve the coming world from the duty of writing another work on the same subject.-Christian Examiner.

*** We have thus surveyed a work whose foundations are laid broad and deep in the most comprehensive learning. The materials are wrought together with consummate art, and the finished structure will stand secure against the attacks of time.-Baptist Review.

The volumes on our table possess a degree of interest and attraction not to be surpassed by any that have been published in the present century, and

open upon us a world as novel as that which the genius of Columbus made bare to the adventurers of Castile and Aragon.--DE Bow's Review of the Southern and Western States.

This work makes a real addition to the stores of knowledge contained in the English language, and it should be remarked that this knowledge is of great value; for the history of the literature of a nation is a reflection of its political history; and, with respect to Spain, its history and its literature are peculiarly interesting and important, as developing the influ. ences of the papal religion under circumstances the most favorable.--New Englander.

Spain's literature (like all national literatures) faithfully mirrors the growth and decay of the national character. To those who feel but little interest in the mere annals of warfare abroad and persecution at home, and care only for the history of the human soul under these adverse circumstances, Mr. Ticknor's three volumes will supply more of interest and information than a hundred regular histories.-Westminster Review.

It is a history in the better sense--dealing with men as well as books, and eliciting, from the facts of literary production, the higher truths of social civilization. There is nothing to compare with it on the subject of which it treats, and we may safely predict that it is likely to hold its ground as a standard book in English literature.—London Examiner.

*** And to these must now be added the recently published History of Spanish Literature, by Mr. Ticknor; a masterly performance, and which perhaps, of all compositions of the kind, has the most successfully combined popularity of style with sound criticism and extensive research within its own compartment.-- Edinburgh Review.

HISTORY OF

SPANISH LITERATURE. .

WITH CRITICISMS ON PARTICULAR WORKS, AND BIOGRAPHICAL

NOTICES OF PROMINENT WRITERS,

BY GEORGE TICKNOR, ESQ.

3 vols. 8v0, MUSLIN, $6 00 ; SHEEP, $6 75; HALF CALF, $7 50.

George Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature, in three volumes, is a masterly work.--Letter of ALEX. VON HUMBOLDT, Potsdam, June 19, 1850.

Mr. G. Ticknor's admirable History of Spanish Literature is written with great conscientiousness, and with singular critical circumspection and judg. ment.-F. WOLF (Dissertation read to the Imperial Academy of Vienna).

There has recently appeared from the American press, written by an American scholar, one of the most comprehensive, profound, and elegant works which has ever been published in the department of literary histo. ry.

We receive it with patriotic pride. But this work could be written, in this country, only by one who could procure for himself the necessary literary apparatus. The library of the author contains some 13,000 volumes, and in the department of Spanish literature is one of the richest in the world.-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to Congress.

It is also with great pleasure that I find another gentleman from the United States, the author of the excellent History of Spanish Literature, augmenting the list of our honorary members.—LORD MAHON's Address to the Society of Antiquaries, London, as their President.

Here is one of those rare and noble contributions of intellect and learning which serve to exalt the character of a nation.--Nat. Intelligencer.

We have no hesitation in affirming that we do not believe there are six men in Europe who are qualified to take Mr. Ticknor's volumes and “re. view" them, in the ordinary sense of the word. The masterly sweep of his general grasp, and the elaborated finish of his constituent sketches, silence the caviler at the very outset.- London Morning Chronicle.

Un ouvrage très remarquable, qui vient de paraître aux Etats Unisl'History of Spanish Literature, par M. Ticknor, presente en trois forts volumes in 8vo un récit complet et judicieux de tout ce qui concerne la litérature de la Péninsule. Résultat de recherches infatigables, cette histoire ne laisse rien à désirer à l'égard du sujet qu'elle traite. Elle est infiniment au dessus des livres de Bouterwek et de Sismondi. -TESCHNER, Bulletin du Bibliophile,Paris.

The appearance of a work like the present is an important event in our literary history. For completeness of plan, depth of learning, and thoroughness of execution, nothing superior has been produced in the English language in our day.-Bibliotheca Sacra.

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