Lectures on Philosophy

Copertina anteriore
Cambridge University Press, 26 ott 1978 - 232 pagine
Simone Weil's Lešons de Philosophie are derived from a course she taught at the lycÚe for girls at Roanne in 1933-4. Anne Reynaud-GuÚrithault was a pupil in the class; her notes are not a verbatim record but are a very full and, as far as one can judge, faithful rendering, often catching the unmistakable tone of Simone Weil's voice as well as the force and the directness of her thought. The lectures form a good general introduction to philosophy, ranging widely over problems about perception, mind, language, reasoning and problems in moral and political philosophy too. Her method of presentation is a characteristic combination of abstract argument, personal experience and literary or historical reference. Peter Winch points out in his introduction to the book some of the more systematic connections in her philosophical work (and between this philosophical work and her other concerns), and makes a number of suggestive comparisons between Simone Weil and Wittgenstein. The translation is by Hugh Price from the Plon edition of 1959. Dr Price has added some notes to explain references in the text that might be unfamiliar to English speaking students beginning philosophy.
 

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Recensione dell'utente  - cjyurkanin - LibraryThing

The notebook of a student of Simone Weil when she taught a class at a girl's school in 1934, expanded with footnotes and explanations to the notes and regarding items unfamiliar to non-philosophy students. Weil's voice can be detected in much of the lessons. Leggi recensione completa

Indice

IV
27
VI
30
VII
33
VIII
37
X
40
XI
44
XII
45
XIII
47
LXVIII
132
LXIX
133
LXXI
134
LXXIII
135
LXXIV
136
LXXV
140
LXXVI
142
LXXVII
143

XIV
57
XV
59
XVI
60
XVIII
61
XIX
62
XX
64
XXI
65
XXIII
67
XXIV
68
XXVI
69
XXVII
74
XXVIII
76
XXX
78
XXXII
81
XXXIII
84
XXXIV
90
XXXVI
91
XXXVII
92
XXXVIII
94
XXXIX
95
XL
96
XLI
97
XLII
99
XLIV
100
XLV
101
XLVI
102
XLVII
105
XLVIII
106
LI
108
LII
110
LIII
111
LIV
113
LVI
117
LVII
118
LVIII
119
LIX
120
LXI
121
LXIII
124
LXIV
125
LXV
129
LXVII
131
LXXVIII
145
LXXIX
146
LXXXI
147
LXXXII
149
LXXXV
150
LXXXVI
152
LXXXVIII
153
XC
155
XCII
156
XCIII
157
XCV
158
XCVII
159
XCVIII
160
XCIX
162
C
165
CII
168
CIII
170
CIV
173
CV
175
CVI
176
CVII
180
CVIII
181
CIX
182
CX
190
CXI
194
CXII
195
CXIII
196
CXV
197
CXVII
200
CXVIII
202
CXIX
205
CXX
206
CXXI
207
CXXII
208
CXXIII
210
CXXV
213
CXXVII
214
CXXVIII
216
CXXIX
222
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Informazioni sull'autore (1978)

Born in Paris, Weil came from a highly intellectual family. After a brilliant academic career at school and university, she taught philosophy interspersed with periods of hard manual labor on farms and in factories. Throughout her life she combined sophisticated and scholarly interests with an extreme moral intensity and identification with the poor and oppressed. A twentieth-century Pascal (see Vol. 4), this ardently spiritual woman was a social thinker, sensitive to the crises of modern humanity. Jewish by birth, Christian by vocation, and Greek by aesthetic choice, Weil has influenced religious thinking profoundly in the years since her death. "Humility is the root of love," she said as she questioned traditional theologians and held that the apostles had badly interpreted Christ's teaching. Christianity was, she thought, to blame for the heresy of progress. During World War II, Weil starved herself to death, refusing to eat while victims of the war still suffered.

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