The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude

Copertina anteriore
Indiana University Press, 1995 - 376 pagine

This book, the text of Martin Heidegger's lecture course of 1929/30, is crucial for an understanding of Heidegger's transition from the major work of his early years, Being and Time, to his later preoccupations with language, truth, and history. First published in German in 1983 as volume 29/30 of Heidegger's collected works, The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics presents an extended treatment of the history of metaphysics and an elaboration of a philosophy of life and nature. Heidegger's concepts of organism, animal behavior, and environment are uniquely developed and defined with intensity. Of major interest is Heidegger's brilliant phenomenological description of the mood of boredome, which he describes as a "fundamental attunement" of modern times.

 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

The fundamental concepts of metaphysics: world, finitude, solitude

Recensione dell'utente  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In these lectures, which noted German philosopher Heidegger gave in 1929-30 at a turning point in his thought, the aim is to show how Western philosophy went wrong. Heidegger says "Being" was confused ... Leggi recensione completa

Pagine selezionate

Sommario

The Task of the Course and Its Fundamental Orientation Starting
1
dealing with
8
The truth of philosophy and its ambiguity
14
The struggle of philosophizing against the insurmountable ambiguity
21
The two meanings of quous in Aristotle Questioning concerning
32
The inherent incongruities of the traditional concept of metaphysics
40
The concept of metaphysics in Thomas Aquinas as historical evi
46
Metaphysics as a title for the fundamental problem of metaphysics
56
Taking the Intermediate Thesis That the Animal
185
The thesis that the animal is poor in world in relation to the thesis
192
attaining
199
Having and not having world as the potentiality for granting trans
209
b The questionable character of the mechanistic conception of vital move
216
The concrete connection between capability and the organ which
222
The intrinsically regulative character of that which is capable
228
The organism as endowed with capability articulating itself into
234

c The beingthere and notbeingthere of attunement on the grounds
63
Making sure of our contemporary situation and of the fundamental
69
Chapter
78
The interpretation of boredom starting from that which is boring
82
Chapter Three
106
Contrasting the second form of boredom with the first with respect
113
The structural unity of the two structural moments of being bored
126
the
127
No longer permitting any passing the time as understanding
134
b Being held in limbo as being impelled toward what originally makes
140
The ordinary assessment of boredom and its suppression of profound
158
The Question Concerning a Particular Profound Boredom as
160
PART
169
Chapter
176
captivation as the animals
246
Concluding delimitation of the essential concept of the organism
257
c The incompleteness of our present interpretation of the essence of
264
Unfolding the Guiding Thesis That the Animal Is Poor in World
268
Chapter
274
world as
282
b The orientation of metaphysics toward the A67og and toward logic
288
3
350
The as a whole as the world and the enigmatic distinction between
352
Projection as the primordial structure of the tripartite fundamental
360
326
366
For Eugen Fink on His Sixtieth Birthday
367
Postscript to the Second Edition
374
Copyright

Altre edizioni - Visualizza tutto

Parole e frasi comuni

Informazioni sull'autore (1995)

William McNeill is Associate Professor of Philosophy at DePaul University. He is co-translator (with Julia Davis) of Hölderlin's Hymn "The Ister" by Martin Heidegger.


Nicholas Walker is Research Fellow in philosophy and literature at Magdalene College, Cambridge.

Informazioni bibliografiche