The History of Rome, Volume 3

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P. A. Mesier, 1823

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Pagina 295 - Marcelli. Let not the memory of Hieronymus weigh more with you than that of Hiero. The latter was much longer your friend than the former your enemy ; and, besides, you have felt many effects of the kindness of the one, while the other's madness tended only to his own ruin.
Pagina 67 - ... of the line being strongly formed by the infantry, so that both extremities of it were composed of Africans, between which Gauls and Spaniards were placed. One would suppose the Africans were for the most part Romans, they were so equipped with arms captured at 'the Trebia, and for the greater part at the Trasimenus. The shields of the Gauls and Spaniards were of the same shape; their swords unequal and dissimilar. The Gauls had very long ones, without points. The Spaniards, who were accustomed...
Pagina 3 - By the direction of the decemvirs, it was decreed, that, first, a golden thunderbolt, of fifty pounds weight, should be made as an offering to Jupiter; and that offerings of silver should be presented to Juno and Minerva ; that sacrifices of the greater victims should be offered to Juno Regina, on the Aventine, and to Juno Sospita, at Lanuvium; that the matrons, contributing such sums of money as might be convenient to each, should carry an offering to Juno Regina, to the Aventine, and celebrate...
Pagina 54 - place, for the sake of the omen, they had brought " a golden statue of Victory, of three hundred and twenty pounds weight, which they prayed them " to accept, hold, and possess, as appropriated to " them for ever. That they had likewise, in order "to guard against any want of provisions, brought three hundred thousand pecks of wheat, and two " hundred thousand of barley : and that whatever "further supplies might be necessary, should be con" veyed to such places as the senate should order.
Pagina 173 - Six miles from the city stood the famous temple of Juno Lacinia, more universally celebrated than the city itself, and held in high veneration by all the surrounding nations. Here, a consecrated grove, encompassed on the extremities by close-ranged trees and tall firs, comprehended in the middle a tract of rich pasture ground, in which cattle of every kind, sacred to the goddess, fed, without any keeper...
Pagina 88 - ... and themselves. Here, then, is the amount of their martial performances during two days; when they ought to have stood in their posts in the battle, and fought, they then fled to their camp; which, instead of defending, they surrendered; showing themselves equally useless there, and in the field. Shall I then ransom such as you? When ye ought to sally forth from your camp, ye hesitate and stay there; and when staying, there is a necessity for defending it, ye make surrender of your arms, and...
Pagina 10 - ... the ardour of the engagement, so eagerly was their attention occupied by the fight, that not one of the combatants perceived a great earthquake, which, at the time, overthrew large portions of many of the cities of Italy, turned rapid rivers out of their courses, carried up the sea voL.
Pagina 255 - ... or receive any military present in reward of courage, or be brought home to Italy while the enemy had any footing there." After this, in pursuance of a decree of the senate, and an order of the people, an assembly of election was held by the city...
Pagina 70 - ... Roman cavalry protecting him; who, at length, when the consul had not strength enough even to manage his horse, dismounted from their horses. And when some one brought intelligence that the consul had ordered the cavalry to dismount, it is said that Hannibal observed, " How much rather would I that he delivered them to me in chains." The fight maintained by the dismounted cavalry was such as might be expected, when the victory was undoubtedly on the side of the enemy, the vanquished preferring...
Pagina 67 - The shout being raised, the auxiliaries advanced, and the fight commenced, first, between the light-armed troops; then the left wing, consisting of Gallic and Spanish cavalry, engaged with the right wing of the Romans ; but not in the usual method of fighting between horsemen, for they were obliged to engage front to front, no room having been left for any evolutions, the river on one side, and the line of infantry on the other...

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