Foe

Copertina anteriore
Viking, 1987 - 157 pagine
33 Recensioni
With the same electrical intensity of language and insight that he brought to Waiting for the Barbarians and The Master of Petersburg, J.M. Coetzee reinvents the story of Robinson Crusoe-and in so doing, directs our attention to the seduction and tyranny of storytelling itself In 1720 the eminent man of letters Daniel Foe is approached by Susan Barton, lately a castaway on a desert island. She wants him to tell her story, and that of the enigmatic man who has become her rescuer, companion, master and sometimes lover: Cruso. Cruso is dead, and his manservant, Friday, is incapable of speech. As she tries to relate the truth about him, the ambitious Barton cannot help turning Cruso into her invention. For as narrated by Foe-as by Coetzee himself-the stories we thought we knew acquire depths that are at once treacherous, elegant, and unexpectedly moving.

Dall'interno del libro

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Valutazioni degli utenti

5 stelle
9
4 stelle
10
3 stelle
13
2 stelle
1
1 stella
0

Review: Foe

Recensione dell'utente  - Edgar Trevizo - Goodreads

Even more misterious and deep than the first two times I read it. In spite of the slow reading, the following of the clues, the theories built over its passages, themes, characters, I still don't know ... Leggi recensione completa

Review: Foe

Recensione dell'utente  - Ariel (mot_avant) - Goodreads

In the spirit of Foe, a story about this book... I bought this book at a recent $5 A Bag book sale at the library. Having walked away with 4 bags of books, it seemed like a pretty successful sale in ... Leggi recensione completa

Indice

Sezione 1
5
Sezione 2
47
Sezione 3
52
Copyright

12 sezioni non visualizzate

Parole e frasi comuni

Informazioni sull'autore (1987)

J.M. Coetzee's full name is John Michael Coetzee. Born in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1940, Coetzee is a writer and critic who uses the political situation in his homeland as a backdrop for many of his novels. Coetzee published his first work of fiction, Dusklands, in 1974. Another book, Boyhood, loosely chronicles an unhappy time in Coetzee's childhood when his family moved from Cape Town to the more remote and unenlightened city of Worcester. Other Coetzee novels are In the Heart of the Country and Waiting for the Barbarians. Coetzee's critical works include White Writing and Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship. Coetzee is a two-time recipient of the Booker Prize and in 2003, he won the Nobel Literature Award.

Informazioni bibliografiche