Sallust's Jugurthine war and Conspiracy of Catiline: with an English commentary, and geographical and historical indexes

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Harper & Brothers, 1840 - 332 pagine

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Pagina xviii - ... hopes vanish ; and throws over the decay, the destruction of existence, the most gorgeous of all lights ; awakens life even in death ; and from corruption and decay calls up beauty and divinity ; makes an instrument of torture and...
Pagina 170 - Lectisternium took place, couches being spread for the gods, as if about to feast, and their statues being taken down from their pedestals and placed upon these couches around the altars, which were loaded with the richest dishes.
Pagina xix - But ere we can say that there is no God — we must have roamed over all nature, and seen that no mark of a Divine footstep was there ; and we must have gotten intimacy with every existent spirit in the universe, and learned from each, that never did a revelation of the Deity visit him ; and we must have searched, not into the records of one solitary planet, but into the archives of all worlds, and thence gathered, that, throughout the wide realms of immensity, not one exhibition of a reigning and...
Pagina 92 - Haec mulier genere atque forma, praeterea viro liberis satis fortunata fuit; litteris Graecis et Latinis docta, psallere saltare elegantius quam necesse est probae, multa alia, quae instrumenta luxuriae sunt. Sed ei cariora semper omnia quam decus atque pudicitia fuit: pecuniae an famae minus parceret, haud facile discerneres: lubido sic accensa, ut saepius peteret viros quam peteretur.
Pagina 287 - Each legion was divided into ten cohorts, each cohort into three maniples, and each maniple into two...
Pagina 261 - Jilium, to educate; non tollere, to expose : But even when his children were grown up, he might imprison, scourge, send them bound to work in the country, and also put them to death by any punishment he pleased, if they deserved it, Sail. Cat. 89. Liv. ii. 41. viii. 7- Dionys. viii. ?9. Hence a father is called a domestic judge, or magistrate, by Seneca ; and a censor of his son, by Suetonius, Claud.
Pagina 82 - ... immutato more, annua imperia, binosque imperatores sibi fecere : eo modo minume posse putabant per licentiam insolescere animum humanum. VII. Sed ea tempestate cœpere se quisque magis extollere, magisque ingenium in promptu habere. Nam regibus boni, quam mali, suspectiores sunt, semperque his aliena virtus formidolosa est.

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