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At this, among other things, family questions, such as adoptions from one clan into another, are decided.

The community has a religious ritual of an extremely complicated yet inexpensive kind, to which it is much devoted.

It has religious rites proper to the family and also to the gens; it has also several private religious guilds, which exist to perform certain rites at intervals; sometimes these guilds are connected with particular clans.

It has priests connected with particular temples and some highly venerated priests, but no organized priesthood'; a priest is not necessary to a sacrifice.

It has three guilds of persons skilled in theology - the pontiffs, the augurs, and the fetiales.

The king appears to have the supreme religious as well as civil power.

The army consists principally of cavalry, which is chosen in equal numbers from the three tribes. In this primitive constitution a great reform takes place.

In consequence of a great population having grown up outside the clans, an army is formed from the whole community, each citizen being ranked according to his property, and required to provide himself with corresponding arms. This army consists mainly of infantry arrayed in phalanx.

The army so constituted is regarded as a national assembly, and when the will of the nation is to be expressed, a single vote is given to each century of the army.

In order to make the property-register, a new local classification is required. Four local city tribes are established.

At some unknown time, but possibly at the same time, the outside population is admitted into the clans, into the three tribes, and into the comitia curiata. But the original clans continue to regard themselves as being the only true clans.

A national temple of unprecedented magnificence is built on the Capitoline hill

A foreign sacred book is acquired, which introduces a Greek element into the religion of the country,

Finally, a revolution takes place, and the king for life is superseded by two magistrates holding power only for a year.

THE END.

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