Adolphus, a Tale

Copertina anteriore
Lise Winer
University of the West Indies Press, 2001 - 364 pagine
The Caribbean Heritage Series is designed to publish historic re-publications of Trinidad Literary Roots and comprises four Trinidadian novels published between 1838 and 1907. This second volume in the series presents two novels, Adolphus, a Tale and The Slave Son. Adolphus was first published in 1853 and was probably written by a Trinidadian mulatto, thus making it the first Trinidadian, and possibly the first West Indian, novel written by a mulatto and the first novel written by someone born and reared in Trinidad. A dramatic nineteenth-century tale, originally published in the newspapers of the day, Adolphus, traces the adventures of a mulatto son of a black slave women raped by a white man. Raised by a kind Spanish-Trinidadian padre, Adolphus grows into a handsome, well-educated, noble character. Later falling in love with Antonia Romelia, he manages to rescue her from a villainous kidnaper and they flee to Venezuela where they are free to marry. The Slave Son was originally published in 1854 by Chapman and Hall, and according to the author's foreword, it was inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and was written to support the abolitionist movement in the Unit
 

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Sommario

Acknowledgements
vi
Preface
5
The Romelia Family
6
Antonia
9
Padre Gonzalvez
12
Adolphus
18
A Night in Port of Spain or Common Occurrences
24
The White Mulatto
29
The Rescue Death
49
The Arrest
55
The Voyage
61
Fortitude A Court of Justice
67
Venezuela
71
The Letter
78
Annotations to Adolphus A Tale
82
The Slave Son by Mrs William Noy Wilkins
93

Abduction
32
Agitated Minds
40
Cudjoe
43
Annotations to The Slave Son
325
References
359
Copyright

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Informazioni sull'autore (2001)

Bridget Brereton is Professor of History, St Augustine, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago. Her major books include A History of Modern Trinidad, Race Relations in the Colonial Trinidad, and Law Justice and Empire. She has also written articles on gender and history in the Caribbean. Rhonda Cobham is Professor of English and Black Studies at Amherst College, Amherst, USA. She has edited special issues of Research in African Literatures and The Massachusetts Review, as well as Watchers and Seekers: An Anthology of Writing by Black Women in Britain. Her essays on Caribbean and African authors, and postcolonial theory have appeared in Calahoo, Transition, RAL, and critical anthologies.

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