A practical treatise on the cultivation of the Grape Vine on open Walls

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Pagina 12 - Introduction ; Observations on the present Method of Cultivating Grape Vines on open Walls ; on the capability and extent of the Fruit-bearing Powers of the Vine; on Aspect; on Soil ; on Manure ; on the Construction of Walls ; on the Propagation of Vines ; on the Pruning of Vines ; on the Training of Vines ; on the Management of a Vine during the first five years of its growth; Weekly Calendarial...
Pagina 119 - ... manure must be laid over the ground, as far as the roots extend ; and if the weather be very severe, it will be better also to cover over the stem to the depth of five or six inches above the top of it. The young plant being thus well protected from the severity of the winter, may remain in this state till the first of March. SECOND YEAR. March 1st. Remove the covering, and fork up the surface of the ground, to the depth of two or three inches, that the sun and air may freely penetrate it. April...
Pagina 7 - Chemical examination has proved, that the young shoots, the tendrils, and the leaves of the vine, possess properties, and contain substances exactly similar to the crude fruit. It was no unnatural conclusion, that they might equally be used for the purposes of making wine. Experiments were accordingly instituted in France with this view, and they have been repeated here with success.
Pagina 13 - Nor let it be supposed that this estimate is madehypothetically ; on the contrary, it is the result of actual inspection and careful observation, and is considerably within the mark as to the quantity of grapes that might be annually grown. Every moderate-sized dwelling-house, having a garden and a little walling attached to it, may with ease be made to produce yearly a quarter of a ton weight of grapes, leaving a sufficient portion of its surface for the production of other fruit...
Pagina 45 - One of the principal causes of grapes not ripening well on open walls in this country, is the great depth of mould in which the roots of vines are suffered to run, which, enticing them to penetrate in search of food below the influence of the sun's rays, supplies them with too great a quantity of moisture...
Pagina 31 - No vine is taken cognisance of, until its stem measures three inches in girt, as, under that size, vines ought never to be suffered to ripen any fruit. This is a rule that should be strictly adhered to in the management of young vines, for it may be safely asserted, that for every pound weight of grapes extracted from a vine before it has grown to that size, ten pounds will be lost during the next five years, independently of the very severe check which is given to its growth by premature bearing....
Pagina 101 - Prune so as to leave as few wounds as possible, and let the surface of every cut be perfectly smooth. 4th. In cutting out an old branch, prune it even with the parent limb, that the wound may heal quickly.
Pagina 76 - Hoare regulates by the height of the wall and its aspect. " If the height be less than four feet, and the aspect south, the coping ought not to project at all, as the light and solar heat excluded by it will be a serious drawback on the healthy vegetation of the vines. But if the wall be four feet high, then the coping may project as many inches ; and if this width be increased an inch for every foot that the wall increases in height up to twelve feet, the principal advantages arising from the protection...
Pagina 70 - There is a disadvantage, however, in training grapes near the ground, as it respects their remaining on the vine after being ripe. If grapes can be kept perfectly dry, they will hang on the vine and improve in flavour for a long time after they are ripe; but if dampness or moisture of any description reach them, the consequences are quickly seen in the decay of the berries. After the middle of October, therefore, it will be found a difficult matter to preserve grapes that hang within two feet of...
Pagina 45 - The natural soil which is most congenial to the growth of the vine, and to the perfection of its fruit in this country, is a light, rich, sandy loam, not more than eighteen inches in depth, on a dry bottom of gravel, stones, or rocks.

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