Livy: Book XXIV-XXX

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Harper & brothers, 1836

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Pagina 18 - Having finished the ceremonies enjoined for conciliating the favour of the gods, the consuls proposed to the senate, to take into consideration the state of the nation, the management of the war, the number of forces to be employed, and the places where the several divisions were to act. It was resolved that eighteen legions should be employed against the enemy ; that each of the consuls take two to himself ; two should be employed in the defence of the provinces of Gaul, Sicily, and Sardinia ; that...
Pagina 395 - ... from their own strength. We feel, it seems, for the public misfortunes, only in proportion as our private affairs are affected by them ; and none of them stings more deeply than the loss of money. Thus, when the spoils were stripped off from vanquished Carthage, and you saw her left naked among so many armed states of Africa, not one of you uttered a groan ; now, because a contribution must be made to the tribute out of your private properties, you lament as if the existence of the state were...
Pagina 387 - ... I have returned after a lapse of thirty-six years. I flatter myself I am well acquainted with the qualifications of a soldier, having been instructed in them from my childhood, sometimes by my own situation, and sometimes by that of my country. The privileges, the laws, and customs of the city and the forum you ought to teach me.
Pagina 174 - ... still, though no violence should take place, that the proceedings formed a most hateful precedent; for that the honours due to valour were being sought by fraud and perjury. That on one side stood the legionary troops, on the other the marines, ready to swear by all the gods what they wished, rather than what they knew, to be true, and to involve in the guilt of perjury not only themselves and their own persons, but the military standards, the eagles, and their solemn oath of allegiance. That...
Pagina 316 - On coming to the King at Pergamus, he received them kindly, conducted them to Pessinus in Phrygia, delivered to them the sacred stone, which the natives said was the mother of the gods, and desired them to convey it to Rome. Marcus Valerius Falto, being sent homeward before the rest, brought an account that they were returning with the goddess ; and that the best man in Rome must be sought out to pay her the due rites of hospitality. Quintus...
Pagina 158 - Let us bring into the treasury to-morrow all our gold, silver, and coined brass, each reserving rings for himself, his wife and children, and a bulla for his son; and he who has a wife or daughters, an ounce weight of gold for each. Let those who have sat in a curule chair have the ornaments of a horse, and a pound weight of silver, that they may have a salt-cellar, and a dish for the service of the gods...
Pagina 155 - But it was at the same time found, that " the disposition of all the rest of the Campanians " towards us was precisely that of the Carthaginians; "yet those beheaded by Fulvius were not the most " criminal among them, but the most eminent in " rank. How the senate can determine on the case " of the Campanians, who are Roman citizens, " without an order of the people, I do not see.
Pagina 369 - When the Carthaginian camp was seen from the walls of the city, what vows were then offered up by each particular person, and by the whole body of the people ! How often, in their assemblies, were their hands stretched out towards heaven, and exclamations heard — O ! will that day ever arrive, when we shall see Italy cleared of the enemy, and blessed once more with the enjoyment of peace ? That now, at length, in the sixteenth year, the gods had granted their wish, and yet not the slightest proposal...
Pagina 379 - Events less correspond to men's expect" ations in war, than in any other case whatever. " Even supposing that you should gain the victory " in battle, the proportion of glory which you " would thereby acquire, in addition to what you " may now securely enjoy on granting peace, " would be, by no means commensurate to that " which you must lose, should any misfortune " happen to you. The chance of but a single " hour may destroy, at once, both the honours " which you have attained, and those for which...
Pagina 369 - ... by each particular person, and by the whole body of the people ! How often, in their assemblies, were their hands stretched out towards heaven, and exclamations heard — O ! will that day ever arrive, when we shall see Italy cleared of the enemy, and blessed once more with the enjoyment of peace ? That now, at length, in the sixteenth year, the gods \ had granted their wish, and yet not the slightest proposal had been made, of returning thanks to th'e gods. So deficient are men in gratitude,...

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