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SINGULAR AND PLURAL.
Gen. sủi, of himself, herself, itself, themselves.
Dat. sibi.
Acc. sē
AU. sē; the double form, sēsē, is often used.

, Note 1.—The preposition cum is placed after the ablatives of the Personal Pronouns, as mecum, with me; vobiscum, with you ; secum, with himself.

NOTE 2.- The syllable met, implying the notion of self, is added to many of the cases of these Pronouns to make emphatic forms, as egomet, I myself, nosmet, vobismet, sibimet.

104.

II. THE POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS.

meus, mine

tuus,

These correspond to Ego, Tu, and Sui : they are

declined like Durus, except that Mi is the thine

vocative masculine of Meus, and Tuus suus, his, her, or their and Suus have no vocative masculine. noster, our 1

declined like Ater. vester, your s

The syllable -pte is added in some cases of the Possessives, chiefly the Ablative Singular, as meapte causa, for my own sake ; nostrapte culpa, by our own fault ; suopte pondere, by its own weight.

105. III. THE CONJUNCTIVE PRONOUNS IS AND Qui.

(1.) Declension of Is, ea, id, that.

ěă

SINGULAR.
Nom. Is èă îd
Gen.

PLURAL.
ёae
èārum eorum
čīs
čas

ēiŭs Dat.

ēí
Acc. èum eam id
Abl. čo èā éo

Nom. či
Gen. ěörum
Dat.
Acc. $os
Abl.

ta ĕis

Note 1.—Is, ea, id may stand as nouns for he, she, it, or as adjectives, thus—is locus, ea res, id bellum.

NOTE 2.—The plural forms ei and eis are often written iï and iis.

Nom. qui

quam quā

quo

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(2.) Declension of the relative Qui, quae, quod, who or which. SINGULAR.

PLURAL.
quae quod

Nom. qui
quae

quae Gen. cūiús

Gen. quorum quārum quorum Dat. cui

Dat.

quibús or quis
Acc.
quem

quòd
Acc. quos
quās

quae Abl. quo

Abl.

quibús or quis Note 1.-An old form of the ablative, qui, of all genders, is found. Standing without a preposition it generally means how, in what way, and it is used with cum annexed, thus, quicum, with whom.

NOTE 2.-A possessive pronoun, cüius, cūia, cūium, is derived from the genitive of qui, with the meaning to whom does it belong ? as, cuium pecus, whose flock is it?

106. Qui usually agrees with its antecedent in gender, number, and

person; its case depends on the construction of the clause to which it belongs Caesar obsides, quos habuit ab Aeduis, reddidit, Caesar

restored the hostages of the Aedui whom he had in his

hands. Honorem mortuo, cui iniuriam vivo fecimus, faciamus, Let

us do honour to the dead man, to whom, when he was alive, we

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did wrong.

Tibi versus, quos rogas, mittam, I will send you the verses for which

you

ask. Audio quae

dicis, I hear what you say. Bellum scripturus sum, quod populus Romanus cum Iugurtha

rege Numidarum gessit, I am about to write the history of the war which the Romans waged with Jugurtha, king of Numidia.

But sometimes the relative agrees in gender and number with a noun in its own clause

Thebae, quod Boeotiae caput est, Thebes, the capital of

Boeotia.

107. Is and qui are essentially conjunctive words, linking sentences together

Luna eam lucem, quam a sole accepit, mittit in terras,

The moon sends to the earth the light she has received from

the sun.

Nunc respondebo ad eas epistolas, quas mihi reddidit

L. Caesius, I will now reply to the letters which Lucius

Caesius handed to me. Observe that in these examples eam and eas are not necessary to the sense, but are put in to balance the sentences.

When emphasis is required for the sentence with is, the quisentence is put first

Quod dixi, id non mutabo, That which I have once said I

will not alter.
Quod honestum, id bonum, That which is right is good.

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Nom. quis or qui
Gen.
Dat.
Acc. quem
Abl. quo

quid or quod

quis or quae
cūiŭs
cui
quam
quā

quid or quod quo

PLURAL.

MAS.

FEM.

NEUT.

quae
quorum

Nom. qui
Gen. quorum
Dat.
Acc. quos
Abl.

quae
quarum
quibus or quis
quās
quibus or quis

quae

The general rule in Latin prose is that the forms,

qui, quae, quod are used as adjectives;

quis, quis, quid are used as nouns. For example

Quis tu es ? Quis id fecit ?

Quid videras ? Quid senseras ? Quid audiveras ? ButQui tu vir et quantus fuisses ? What and how great a man would

you

have been? Quae mulier est tam mollis ? What woman is so soft-hearted ? Quae anus est tam delira ? What old woman is so crazy?

V. THE INDEFINITE Quis, any one. 109. This Pronoun is declined like Quis, who ? except that it has a third form quă for the nominative feminine singular, and for the nominative and accusative neuter plural. It is much used with the conjunction Si, ifSi qua tui Corydonis habet te cura, venito, If you have

any thought about your Corydon, come.—VIRG. Si qua manent sceleris vestigia nostri, If any traces of our

crime remain.–VIRG.

110. VI. THE DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS.
(1.) Hic, this, near me, the speaker.

Iste, that, near you, the person spoken to.
Ille, that, yonder, at a distance from the speaker and the
person spoken to.
SINGULAR.

PLURAL.
MAS.
FEM. NEUT.

MAS.

FEM. NEUT. Nom. hsc haec hóc Nom, hi

hae haec Gen. hūius

Gen. horum harum horum Dat. huic

Dat.

his Acc. hunc hanc hóc Acc. hos hās haec Abl. hoc hāc hoc Abl.

his Hic and hoc, in the nom. and acc., are usually long. The emphasizing suffix -ce is often added, as hujusce, hosce.

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The addition of the suffis -c introduces other forms; as

Nom. istic, istaec, istoc.
Acc. istunc, istanc, istoc.

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The addition of the suffix -c introduces such forms as

Nom. illic, illaec, illoc.
Acc. illunc, illanc, illoc.

Note 1.-Hic, as referring to the present time, is often contrasted with ille, referring to past events

Q. Catulus non antiquo illo more sed hoc nostro fuit eru

ditus, Quintus Catulus was trained, not after the ancient fashion but in the

way

that is now in vogue.

NOTE 2.Ille is often emphatic

Hic est ille Demosthenes, This is the famous Demosthenes.

111. Closely connected with the Pronouns Hic, Iste, Ille, are the following adverbs of place :

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