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2 Hark! how the feathered warblers sing !

'Tis Nature's cheerful voice; Soft music hails the lovely spring,

And woods and fields rejoice.

3 Earth and her thousand voices give

Their thousand notes of praise; And all, that by his mercy live,

To God their offering raise.

4 O God of nature and of grace,

Thy heavenly gifts impart;
Then shall my meditation trace

Spring, blooming in my heart.
5 Inspired to praise, I then shall join

Glad Nature's cheerful song, And love and gratitude divine

Attune my joyful tongue.

7 & 68. M.

696.

BRITISH MAG.

Autumn.

i The leaves around me falling

Are preaching of decay;
The hollow winds are calling,

“ Come, pilgrim, come away"
The day, in night declining,

Says I must too decline;
The year its bloom resigning,

Its lot foreshadows mine.

2 The light my path surrounding,

The loves to which I cling,
The hopes within me bounding,
The joys that round me wing, -

All, all, like stars at even,

Just gleam and shoot away,
Pass on before to heaven,

And chide at my delay.
3 The friends gone there before me

Are calling from on high,
And happy angels o'er me

Tempt sweetly to the sky:
“ Why wait," they say, “and wither,

'Mid scenes of death and sin ? O rise to glory, hither,

And find true life begin."

8 & 78. M.

697.

Bp. HORNE. Autumn Warnings. 1 See the leaves around us falling,

Dry and withered to the ground, Thus to thoughtless mortals calling,

In a sad and solemn sound: 2 " Sons of Adam, (once in Eden,

Where, like us, he blighted fell,) Hear the lesson we are reading;

Mark the awful truth we tell.

3 “ Youth, on length of days presuming,

Who the paths of pleasure tread; View us, late in beauty blooming,

Numbered now among the dead.

“What though yet no losses grieve you,

Gay with health and many a grace; Let not cloudless skies deceive you :

Summer gives to autumn place.

5

“ Yearly in our course returning,

Messengers of shortest stay,
Thus we preach this truth concerning,

Heaven and earth shall pass away.” 6 On the tree of life eternal,

O let all our hopes be laid ;
This alone, for ever vernal,

Bears a leaf that shall not fade.

1

2

H. M. 698.

FREEMAN.
Imitation of Thomson's Hymn on the Seasons.
LORD of the worlds below!

On earth thy glories shine;
The changing seasons show

Thy skill and power divine.
In all we see

The rolling years A God appears ;

Are full of thee.
Forth in the flowery spring

We see thy beauty move;
The birds on branches sing-

Thy tenderness and love;
Wide flush the hills; Devotion's calm
The air is balm : Our bosom fills.

Then come, in robes of light,

The summer's flaming days;
The sun, thine image bright,

Thy majesty displays;
And oft thy voice But still our souls
In thunder rolls; In thee rejoice.
4 In autumn, a rich feast

Thy common bounty gives

3

To man, and bird, and beast,

And everything that lives.
Thy liberal care, And harvest moon,
At morn and noon Our lips declare.
5 In winter, awful thou!

With storms around thee cast;
The leafless forests bow

Beneath thy northern blast.
While tempests lower, We homage bring,
To thee, dread King, And own thy power.

L. M.

699.

DODDRIDGE.

For a New Year.

i Great God, we sing that mighty hand,
By which supported still we stand:
The opening year thy mercy shows;

That mercy crowns it, till it close.
2 By day, by night, at home, abroad,

Still are we guarded by our God,
By his incessant bounty fed,

By his unerring counsel led.
3 With grateful hearts the past we own;

The future, all to us unknown,
We to thy guardian care commit,
And peaceful leave before thy feet.

4 In scenes exalted or depressed,

Thou art our joy, and thou our rest;
Thy goodness all our hopes shall raise,
Adored through all our changing days.

5 When death shall interrupt these songs,

And seal in silence mortal tongues, Our helper, God, in whom we trust, In better worlds our souls shall boast.

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2 It

i Our Father! through the coming year

We know not what shall be,
But we would leave without a fear

Its ordering to thee.
may

be we shall toil in vain
For what the world holds fair,
And all its good we thought to gain

Deceive, and prove but care. 3 It may be it shall darkly blend

Our love with anxious fears,
And snatch away the valued friend,

The tried of many years.
4 It may be it shall bring us days

And nights of lingering pain, And bid us take our farewell gaze

Of these loved haunts of men. 5 But calmly, Lord, on thee we rest;

No fears our trust shall move; Thou knowest what for each is best,

And thou art perfect love.

501

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