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occur in four parts in Lowe; but in Barnard's collection, published twenty years earlier, they are given in five parts, as well as the Preces, except at the words “ And our mouth shall shew forth thy praise,” where the harmony is in four parts only. Again, to attribute such harmony as the following to Tallis (which occurs in the second edition of Lowe, 1664), is a libel upon his name.

0 ho- ly, bless-ed, and glo-si-ous 1'ri-ni - ty,

O ho - ly, bless-ed, and glo - ri- ous Tri-ni - ty,
Ooh

A
() ho- ly, bless-ed, and glo - ri-ous Tri-ni - ty,

O ho - ly, bless-ed, and glo-ri-ous Tri-ni - ty,

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Much more of the Litany is given in the same naked harmony; for which reason, and from the fact that

Barnard's books were published so long before Lowe's work appeared, the Editor cannot but consider the former the highest authority-no earlier printed work containing Tallis's service being known.

It is now time to point out the additions which have been made to the service in the present work, and to substantiate the assertion in a former page, as to certain portions having been incorrectly ascribed to Tallis.

In Boyce, as well as in Barnard, Tallis's service commences with the versicle “ O Lord, open thou our lips :" the whole of page i, therefore, has been added by the Editor, the Lord's Prayer being given on E, the major third above the foregoing versicle, from Marbeck’s example ; and the preceding portion on a single tone, agreeable to the practice of most cathedrals. In some places, however, it is customary to chant the Confession on a lower tone than the sentences and exhortation ; but this seems rather an exception to the general rule*. As to the Amens, the rule has been adopted throughout this work of chanting those which are printed in roman letters in the Prayer Book, and which form integral portions of the prayers, &c. to which they are appended, on the same note as the prayers themselves: and those which are responsive, (as shown by the italic character in which they are printed), in harmonyt. It is true that one exception to this occurs at the end of the Absolution, where, though the Amen is responsive, it has been given in unison. This has been done from the consideration that as the musical service cannot strictly be said to

• The Author of An Apology for Cathedral Service intimates otherwise (see page 99 of that work); but this appears somewhat incorrect, as it is the practice at Westminster Abbey and other Cathedrals to chant the Confession on a higher tone.

+ See Jebb’s Three Lectures on the Cathedral Service, pages 7 and 17, on the difference between the roman and italic Amen.

commence before the versicle,“O Lord, open thou our lips,” (previously to which the key note is usually given on the organ), it might be as well to abstain from the introduction of harmony before that part of Morning and Evening Prayer. But those who think otherwise, are recommended to use the Amen marked No. 1, at the end of the Communion Service.

The response, “ O Lord, make haste to help us” (p. ii of this work), is evidently copied from Bird's Second Preces, though the harmony and duration of the notes, at the commencement of the first two bars are different, and the arrangement is in four parts only. The response by Bird, as well as that by Tallis, is here given from Barnard; but Boyce's text has been preferred, because, as Mr. Jebb remarks*, “ The two divisions of the verset are exactly parallel in sense, and therefore demand a similar musical enunciation."

From Bird's Second Preces.

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* Choral Service of the Church, page 264.

† That is, “ O God, make speed to save us. O Lord, make haste to help us.”

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The whole of the Gloria Patri was formerly sung in harmony, and is so given in the Preces of Tallis, Bird, and Gibbons. But the Prayer Book now directs it to be sung as verse and response. The last two bars of it, at page iii, are like those in Bird's second Preces in the treble and bass. It has already been observed that the whole of Tallis's Preces, Responses, and Litany, are given in five parts in Barnard, except at the words, “And our mouth shall shew forth thy praise.”

As the words “ The Lord's Name be praised” were not added until the last review in 1662, the music at page it has been adapted either by Boyce or some other person from that given to the words “Praise ye the Lord" by Tallis, which words were formerly repeated.

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After this, in Barnard's work, occur three Psalms by Tallis, upon which Mr. Jebb makes the following remarks: “In Barnard's book of Selected Church Music, published in 1641, there are singular arrangements of some of the Psalms, or parts of Psalms, not to chants, but to varied melodies resembling our Services. Thus, after Tallis's Preces (the same as those given by Dr. Boyce), follow the second, third, and fourth parts of the 119th Psalm, set in this manner, with the notice; these Psalms following are to be sung on the twenty-fourth day of the month at evening prayer.' After Bird's Preces, in like manner, the 47th and 54th Psalm. But after a second set of his Preces, and after one by Gibbons, follow certain selected verses from Psalms. What was the intention or use of these anomalous compositions, I am unable

* The Counter-tenor parts here unite.

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