History of England: From the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles, 1713-1783, Volume 4

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Little, Brown, 1853
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Pagina 100 - Indian race, from the mouth of the St. Lawrence to the mouth of the Mississippi, had become estranged from the English and friendly to the French.
Pagina 108 - I am so far recovered as to do business ; but my constitution is entirely ruined, without the consolation of having done any considerable service to the state, or without any prospect of it.
Pagina 109 - The paths of glory lead but to the grave " — must have seemed at such a moment fraught with mournful meaning. At the close of the recitation Wolfe added, "Now, gentlemen, I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.
Pagina xv - If I was surprised to find him there, I was still more astonished when he acquainted me with the motives which had induced him to hazard a journey to England at this juncture. The impatience of his friends who were in exile had formed a scheme which was impracticable; but although it had been as feasible as they had represented it to him, yet no preparation had been made, nor was anything ready to carry it into execution.
Pagina 155 - The Ambassador from Tripoli and his son were carried to see that chamber. The procession through a line of foot-guards, every seventh man bearing a torch, the horse-guards lining the outside, their officers with drawn sabres and crape sashes on horseback, the drums muffled, the fifes, bells tolling, and minute guns, all this was very solemn.
Pagina 158 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton...
Pagina 37 - Oh, indeed, he shall be tried " immediately ; he shall be hanged directly...
Pagina 9 - Graced as thou art, with all the power of words, So known, so honour'd, at the house of lords : Conspicuous scene ! another yet is nigh (More silent far,) where kings and poets lie : Where Murray (long enough his country's pride) Shall be no more than Tully or than...
Pagina 158 - He fell into a fit of crying the moment he came into the chapel, and flung himself back in a stall, the archbishop hovering over him with a smelling-bottle ; but in two minutes his curiosity got the better of his hypocrisy, and he ran about the chapel with his glass to spy who was or was not there, spying with one hand, and mopping his eyes with the other.
Pagina 195 - I am sorry for it, since otherwise he would have certainly compelled us to leave him [Has ruled us, may not I say, with a rod of iron !] But if he be resolved to assume the office of exclusively advising his Majesty and directing the operations of the War, to what purpose are we called to this Council ? When he talks of being responsible to the People, he talks the language of the House of Commons; forgets that, at this Board, he is only responsible to the King.

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