Beauty: Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman

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Henry G. Langley, 1845 - 390 pagine
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Pagina 28 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths ; all these have vanished ; They live no longer in the faith of reason...
Pagina 351 - She then thought .of that expression — it is a pleasant thing for the eyes to behold the sun — which words then seemed to her to be very applicable to Jesus Christ.
Pagina 62 - On the whole, it appears to me, that what is called taste, in its most general acceptation, is not a simple idea, but is partly made up of a perception of the primary pleasures of sense, of the secondary pleasures of the imagination, and of the conclusions of the reasoning faculty, concerning the various relations of these, and concerning the human passions, manners, and actions.
Pagina 121 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Pagina 298 - Apollo ; but in that form which is taken from all, and which partakes equally of the activity of the Gladiator, of the delicacy of the Apollo, and of the muscular strength of the Hercules. For perfect beauty in any species must combine all the characters which are beautiful in that species.
Pagina 60 - In the morning of our days, when the senses are unworn and tender, when the whole man is awake in every part, and the gloss of novelty fresh upon all the objects that surround us, how lively at that time are our sensations, but how false and inaccurate the judgments we form of things!
Pagina 28 - They live no longer in the faith of reason ! But still the heart doth need a language ; still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names...
Pagina 62 - Where good sense is wanting, he is not qualified to discern the beauties of design and reasoning, whic-h are the highest and most excellent.
Pagina 127 - I am convinced that we have a degree of delight, and that no small one, in the real misfortunes and pains of others...
Pagina 50 - A man in a fever would not insist on his palate as able to decide concerning flavours; nor would one affected with the jaundice pretend to give a verdict with regard to colours. In each creature there is a sound and a defective state; and the former alone can be supposed to afford us a true standard of taste and sentiment.

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