Livy, Volume 4

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A. J. Valpy, 1834
 

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This review is the same for each of his volumes: Livy is the quintessential historian of ancient Rome. He had his obvious flaws - no one could consider him unbiased in his approach, and he creates ... Leggi recensione completa

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Pagina 105 - What else would you ask if you had been conquered ? I have captured two of the enemy's camps, full, of course, of booty and provisions ; supply me with corn and money. What else would you ask had you been plundered and stripped of your camp ? And that I may not be the only person perplexed, I could wish that either Himilco or Mago...
Pagina 12 - ... every particular. Then, when they did separate from about the informants, might be seen their countenances expressive of various emotions, according as the intelligence, which each received, was pleasing or unfavourable; and numbers, surrounding them, returned to their houses offering either congratulations or comfort. Among the women, particularly, the effects both of joy and grief were very conspicuous; one, as we are told, meeting, unexpectedly, at the very gate, her son returning safe, expired...
Pagina 327 - When you snail have indulged plentifully in food and wine, the same cup that will be given to me shall go round. That cup will save our bodies from torture, our minds from insult, our eyes and ears from the sight and hearing of all the cruelties and indignities that await the conquered. There will be persons in readiness to throw our lifeless bodies on a large pile kindled in the courtyard of the house. This way alone conducts us to death with honour and freedom. Our enemies themselves will admire...
Pagina 8 - ... them, when it was evident that there was no hope of safety but in the right hand and the sword; then each man became to himself a leader, and encourager to action; and an entirely new contest arose, not a regular line, with principes, hastati, and triarii; nor of such a sort as that the vanguard should fight before the standards, and the rest of the troops behind them; nor such that each soldier should be in his own legion, cohort, or company: chance collects them into bands; and each man's own...
Pagina 103 - in conformation of his joyful intelligence," says the same historian, XXIII. 12, " he ordered the gold rings taken from the Romans to be poured down in the porch of the senate-house, and of these there was so great a heap that, according to some writers, on being measured, they filled three pecks and a half ; but the more general account, and likewise the more probable is, that they amounted to no more than one peck. He also explained to them, in order to show the greater extent of the slaughter,...
Pagina 71 - ... so many thousand Romans, horsemen and footmen, lay promiscuously on the field, as chance had thrown them together, either in the battle, or flight. Some, whom their wounds, being pinched by the morning cold, had roused from their posture, were put to death, by the enemy, as they were rising up, covered with blood, from the midst of the heaps of carcasses. Some they found lying alive, with their thighs and hams cut, who, stripping their necks and throats, desired them to spill what remained of...
Pagina 11 - ... happened; in what state was the army. At length, after a crowd, not less numerous than that of a full assembly of the people, had collected in the comitium and about the senate-house, calling on the magistrates for information, a little before sunset, Marcus Pomponius, the praetor, told them, "We have been defeated in a
Pagina 67 - ... Roman cavalry protecting him; who, at length, when the consul had not strength enough even to manage his horse, dismounted from their horses. And when some one brought intelligence that the consul had ordered the cavalry to dismount, it is said that Hannibal observed, " How much rather would I that he delivered them to me in chains." The fight maintained by the dismounted cavalry was such as might be expected, when the victory was undoubtedly on the side of the enemy, the vanquished preferring...
Pagina 362 - Let us bring into the treasury to-morrow all our gold, silver, and coined brass, each reserving rings for himself, his wife and children, and a bulla for his son; and he who has a wife or daughters, an ounce weight of gold for each. Let those who have sat in a curule chair have the ornaments of a horse, and a pound weight of silver, that they may have a salt-cellar, and a dish for the service of the gods...
Pagina 116 - ... in provisions,) nor had he any hope of getting them conveyed in clandestinely by his men. He therefore collected corn from all parts of the country round ; and having filled therewith a great number of. casks, sent a messenger to Casilinum to the magistrate, desiring that the people should catch the casks which the river would bring down. The following night was passed in attentively watching for the completion of the hopes raised by the Roman messenger, when the casks, being sent along the middle...

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