The Life of Fenelon, Archbishop of Cambray

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A. Finley, 1811 - 236 pagine
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Pagina 128 - ... multitude, there was nothing to which he could look but his own powers. Obliged to fight for his honour, it was necessary for him, if he did not consent to sink under the accusation, to assume a port still more imposing than that of his mighty antagonist. Much had been expected from him, but none had supposed that he would raise himself to so prodigious a height as would not only repel the attack of his antagonist, but actually reduce him to the defensive. Bossuet published remarks on Fenelon's...
Pagina 121 - Nothing could exceed the consternation, which this raised among the friends of Fenelon, at Rome, and at Paris:—His first intention was not to answer it; but the abbe de Chanterac informed him, that the impression, which it made against him at Rome was so strong, that a full refutation of it was absolutely necessary. He therefore determined to reply. Bossuet's relation appeared in the middle of June, Fenelon's reply was published on the third of August.
Pagina 177 - Moses ; of that canticle in particular, which all the children of Israel were obliged to learn by heart. No Greek or Latin poetry is comparable to the psalms. That, which begins, " The God of Gods, the Lord hath spoken, and hath called up the earth," exceeds whatever human imagination has produced.
Pagina 128 - Meaux has thrown crosses on me." Never did virtue and genius obtain a more complete triumph. , Fenelon's reply, by a kind of enchantment, restored to him every heart. Crushed by the strong arm of power, abandoned by the multitude, there was nothing to which he could look but his own powers. Obliged to fight for his honour, it was necessary for him, if he did not consent to sink under the accusation, to assume .a port still more imposing than that of his mighty antagonist. Much had been expected from...
Pagina 115 - Believe me, we have been too long a spectacle to the world, an object of derision to the ungodly, of compassion to the good. " That other men should be men, is not surprising ; but that the ministers of Jesus Christ, the angels of the church, should exhibit such scenes to the profane, to the unbeliever, calls for tears of blood.
Pagina 146 - ... last our Holy Father the Pope has condemned this book, together with the twenty-three propositions extracted from it, in a Brief dated March 12, 1699, which is spread abroad everywhere, and which you have already seen. " We give our adhesion to this Brief, dear brethren, both as regards the text of the book and the twentythree propositions, simply, absolutely, and without a shadow of reserve, and we forbid the faithful of this diocese to read or retain the book.
Pagina 51 - you yesterday told me you knew who you were, and who I was. My duty obliges me to inform you that you know neither. You imagine that you are greater than I am ; this some valet has told you ; but you oblige me to tell you, that I am greater than you. Birth, here, is out of the question. You would pronounce a person^ mad, who should give himself a preference over his neighbour, because the dews of heaven had fertilized his field and not fallen on his neighbour's. You are not wiser than such a man;...
Pagina 119 - In composing it, he availed himself of some secret and confidential writings which he had received from madame de Guyon, of private letters written to him by Fenelon, during their early intimacy, and of a letter, which, under the seal of friendship, Fenelon had written to madame de Maintenon, and which, in this trying hour, she unfeelingly communicated to Bossuet. The substance of these different pieces, Bossuet connected with so much art, interwove in them the mention of so many curious facts, so...
Pagina 35 - were designed, by their native elegance " and softness, to endear domestic life to man, " to make virtue lovely to children, to spread " around them order and grace, and to give to " society its highest polish. No attainment can " be above beings, whose end and aim...

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