Great Works of Art and what Makes Them Great

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Garden City Publishing, 1925 - 552 pagine
This is a book of combat, in which little quarter will be given to certain tendencies in the art world and the pessimistic cynicism and childish hypocrisy by which they are pushed forward. Ruckstull makes his point with 175 illustrations from the art world.

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Pagina 164 - Indeed there can be no more useful help for discovering what poetry belongs to the class of the truly excellent, and can therefore do us most good, than to have always in one's mind lines and expressions of the great masters, and to apply them as a touchstone to other poetry.
Pagina 202 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Pagina 85 - I dwelt alone In a world of moan, And my soul was a stagnant tide, Till the fair and gentle Eulalie became my blushing bride — Till the yellow-haired young Eulalie became my smiling bride.
Pagina 280 - Art should be independent of all clap-trap — should stand alone, and appeal to the artistic sense of eye or ear, without confounding this with emotions entirely foreign to it, as devotion, pity, love, patriotism, and the like. All these have no kind of concern with it; and that is why I insist on calling my works "arrangements
Pagina 478 - A PICTURE is finished when all trace of the means used to bring about the end has disappeared. To say of a picture, as is often said in its praise, that it shows great and earnest labour, is to say that it is incomplete and unfit for view.
Pagina 2 - Doubt, chance, and mutability. Thy light alone, like mist o'er mountains driven Or music by the night wind sent Thro' strings of some still instrument, Or moonlight on a midnight stream, Gives grace and truth to life's unquiet dream.
Pagina 74 - No more fiendish punishment could be devised, were such a thing physically possible, than that one should be turned loose in society and remain absolutely unnoticed by all the members thereof. If no one turned round when we entered, answered when we spoke, or minded what we did, but if every person we met "cut us dead...
Pagina 35 - ... (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors and wanderings and mists and tempests in the vale below; so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
Pagina 354 - surprising;' and were reminded bitterly of Hazlitt's account of it: 'Excellent talker, very, — if you let him start from no premises and come to no conclusion.
Pagina 165 - Build thee more stately mansions, 0 my soul, As the swift seasons roll! Leave thy low- vaulted past! Let each new temple, nobler than the last, Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, Till thou at length art free, Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!

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