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Up, Fairy quit thy bower.
A stitch in time saves nine.
Time's scythe mows down all.
I prize your friendship highly
no lark more blithe than he.
The image stands in the niche.
Keeping time, time, time,
In a sort of runic rhyme. P

Poe

To the Teacher. Call attention to the silent letters in the next lesson. Direction. Study down the columns, then from left to right.

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Idle weeds are fast in growth.
Ghosts exist only in the brain.

The sun is the source of light.
a hoax! cried the young folks.
Knock, fenock! Whos there?
Blessed are they that mourn.
Owe no man anything.
The rogue dodged into the copse.

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Evil news rides fast.
Pleasure oft is the lure to sin.
fudge not, that ye be not judged.
Use words that are in good use.
The ship scuds before the gale.
Give the cue, and I will speak.
He is only silent, not dumb.
a cube has six square sides.

To the Teacher. Drill the pupils on giving the long and the short sound of each vowel.

Direction. Copy and study the following words.

source ,

sphere ache

zinc breadth badge scythe dodge knell gnash comb copse wedge scheme ghost crumb

Direction. Copy the following stanza, and pick out the words containing the sounds which you have learned.

across the Hue shy together Paced three little clouds one day; The sun they had passed at noon

time, The west was a league away. "Oh, he is so slow,"they whispered, Do slow, and so far behind, We three can be first at sunset If only we have a mind."st

St. Nicholas

To the Teacher Talk with the pupils about the punctuation, the peculiar use and arrangement of words, the rhyme, poetic fancy, etc.

1

To the Teacher. We would not advise the memorizing of these partial definitions. The elliptical expressions will suggest a variety of interesting exercises. They may be filled out and copied, they may be used for oral recitation, or they may be written in class from dictation. ā ē i ō ū ý

8 8 / 8 x ý pain, ache.

bad, not good.

6 pane, - of glass.

bade, told. be, to exist.

bell, – for ringing. 2

7 bee, an insect.

belle, a fine, gay lady.

him, that man or boy.

8 stile, steps over a fence.

hymn, a sacred song. 3 style, fashion, manner.

knot, a tie; a hard place

9 in wood. hole, an opening. 4 whole, all.

not, a word of denial.

but, a connecting word. blew, did blow.

10 butt, larger end; to strike 5 blue, a color.

with the head.

Direction. Put the right word in the right place.

The (5) sky bends over all. Coleridge.
'Tis (9) the (4) of life to live. Montgomery.
Sweet is pleasure after (1). Dryden,
So sweetly she (6) me adieu. — Shenstone.
Thus (6) begins and worse remains behind. - Shakespeare.
By turns a slattern or a (7). Goldsmith.
How soft the music of those village (7)s! - Cowper.
A (2)hive's hum shall soothe my ear. - Shakespeare.
The foxes have (4)s. Bible.
Green vales and icy cliffs, all join my (8). — Coleridge.

(10) he lay like a warrior taking his rest,

With his martial cloak around (8). – Wolfe. “ The face against the (1).” “I am sitting on the (3), Mary.” The (10) of the whip. The beast (10)s me away.

Shakespeare. “It (5) a gale.” (3) of dress. Untie the (9). (9)ty timber. (2) just and fear (9). Shakespeare.

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