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It is customary for the teacher to give the illustrative sentences when dictating the words; but the suggestions given in connection with the following lessons will enable the pupils to give the illustrations, which is far better. If the illustrations are given orally, it would be well to have several pupils at the blackboard to write such of the sentences as have particular merit, or such as the teacher may wish to present for criticism.

It is hoped that the character of the illustrative phrases and sentences in this book will aid the teacher in resisting the tendency of pupils to put meaningless, trashy stuff into their exercises.

Pupils should be required to keep a list of the words which they misspell, and to rewrite them frequently, in sentences and separately.

Written and oral spelling should be combined. The best results are obtained by addressing both eye and ear.

Oral spelling should be made an aid to correct pronunciation. Pupils should be required to pronounce and spell each word in a clear, natural tone of voice, making a slight pause between the syllables.

In oral spelling, the teacher may stimulate the interest of the pupils by allowing them to "go up," or to win rank by correcting misspelled words, and an occasional old-fashioned spelling match will add fresh zeal to the work.

It is believed that the “ directions” given in connection with the different lessons throughout this book will aid both teacher and pupil.

In most of the lessons on synonyms the teacher will notice that each

group of synonymous words has a certain relation to the following group. This will enable the pupil, in writing illustrative paragraphs, to pass, by an easy transition, from one group to another, weaving the whole into one connected composition. The importance of this work in synonyms can hardly be overestimated.

For suggestions concerning the teaching of word analysis, see p. 163.

PART I

Lesson 1. ā, long, in hāte

To the Pupil. Look at each word till you can turn away and see a perfect picture of it in your mind. Study down the columns, then from left to right. ā

ā
ai

āy trace

case
aid

lay chase place aim

fray vase scale praise

gray space skate claim

spray grace

haze
faint

sway ache bathe jail

stray

Note carefully the capital

Direction. Copy the following sentences. letters and the punctuation.

now comes a faint trace of gray. The sun will chase away the haze. Let another man praise thee. Where does space begin and end? The dew bathes every spray.

To the Teacher. Let the pupils give short sentences orally for the words of the lesson not found in the script exercises. Drill in the pronunciation and the use of the words in the next lesson.

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Remember that

Direction. Copy the following sentences with care. the punctuation is a part of the written sentence.

Avoid a nasal tivang.
He never shrank from duty.
Thatch the roof with straw.
The scamp sprang into the track.
Crash! it went down the chasm.

The dean was famous in his time, And had a kind of knack at rhyme.-swift

To the Teacher,

Call attention to the punctuation, capitals, rhyme, etc.

To the Pupil. Look at each word till you can turn away and see a perfect picture of it in your mind. Study down the columns, then from left to right. ē za ёa

ēe eve bleak near

kneel mere preach means

cheer scene cheat peak

fleece scheme heave please

screen sphere least

sheaf

freeze theme leave

streak

queer

Direction. Copy the following sentences.

Life is buit a means unto an end.
Bleak blows the blast.
Least said is soonest mended.
Be of good cheer.
He chose a queer theme.
Was it a scheme to cheat?
How sweet are childhoods scenes!
Her locks are like a golden fleece.

To the Teacher. Call attention to the silent letters in the next lesson.

Direction. Study down the columns, then from left to right.

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anidle man tempts the devil.
Words pay no debts.
Walth cannot buy health
The guilty soul dreads death.
Many waterscannot quench love.
Beads of sweat stood on his brow.
a dense hedge served as a fence.
His threat was meant as a jest.

To the Teacher. Help the pupils to grasp the thoughts contained in these exercises, and encourage them to put meaning into their original sentences.

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