Phrenological Journal and Magazine of Moral Science, Volume 15

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Pagina 206 - In vain may it be urged that the good of the individual ought to yield to that of the community, for it would be dangerous to allow any private man, or even any public tribunal, to be the judge of this common good, and to decide whether it be expedient or no. Besides, the public good is in nothing more essentially interested than in the protection of every individual's private rights as modelled by the Municipal Law.
Pagina 337 - Man having been created after this manner, it is said, as a consequence, that man became a living soul ? whence it may be inferred (unless we had rather take the heathen writers for our teachers respecting the nature of the soul) that man is a living being, intrinsically and properly one and individual, not compound or separable, not, according to the common opinion, made up and framed of two distinct and different natures, as of soul and body, — but that the whole man is soul, and the soul man,...
Pagina 98 - The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Pagina 206 - So great moreover is the regard of the law for private property, that it will not authorize the least violation of it; no, not even for the general good of the whole community. If a new road, for instance, were to be made through the grounds of a private person, it might perhaps be extensively beneficial to the public; but the law permits no man, or set of men, to do this without consent of the owner of the land.
Pagina 99 - The natural and active sense of property pervades the foundations of social improvement. It leads to the cultivation of the earth, the institution of government, the establishment of justice, the acquisition of the comforts of life, the growth of the useful arts, the spirit of commerce, the productions of taste, the erections of charity, and the display of the benevolent affections": 2 Kent's Commentaries, 13th ed.,.
Pagina 321 - He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?
Pagina 98 - Property and law are born together, and die together. Before laws were made there was no property ; take away laws, and property ceases.
Pagina 206 - Not by absolutely stripping the subject of his property in an arbitrary manner, but by giving him a full indemnification and equivalent for the injury thereby sustained. The public is now considered as an individual, treating with an individual for an exchange. All that the legislature does, is to oblige the owner to alienate his possessions for a reasonable price ; and even this is an exertion of power, which the legislature indulges with caution, and which nothing but the legislature can perform.
Pagina 156 - Bred to think as well as speak by rote, they furnish their minds, as they furnish their houses, or clothe their bodies, with the fancies of other men, and according to the mode of the age and country. They pick up their ideas and notions in common conversation, or in their schools. The first are always superficial, and both are commonly false.
Pagina 206 - In this and similar cases the Legislature alone can, and, indeed, frequently does. interpose and compel the individual to acquiesce, but how does it interpose and compel ? Not by absolutely stripping the subject of his property in an arbitrary manner, but by giving him a full indemnification and equivalent for the injury thereby sustained.

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