Our Singing Country: Folk Songs and Ballads

Copertina anteriore
Courier Corporation, 1 gen 2000 - 416 pagine
This sequel to the Lomaxes' widely acclaimed American Ballads and Folk Songs includes melodies and words for tunes from all parts of the country. Songs include spirituals, hollers, game songs, lullabies, courting songs, chain-gang work songs, Cajun airs, breakdowns, and many more. Judith Tick, a scholar and award-winning author, provides a new fact-filled Introduction; notes on tune origins, two indexes, and an extensive bibliography round out this archive of some 200 authentic folk songs and ballads.
 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Nessuna recensione trovata nei soliti posti.

Sommario

70
4
74
23
Mammas Gone to the Mail Boat
94
254
99
264
132
Little Bonny
148
MEN AT WORK
197
Run Along You Little Dogies
242
Bugger Burns
331
Po Lazus
342
Lights in the Quarters Burnin Mighty
362
The Rising Sun Blues
368
Lines from the Blues
374
Lord Its All Almost Done
386
BIBLIOGRAPHY
405
280
411

If Hed Be a Buckaroo
249
Adieu to the Stone Walls
311
Brennan on the Moor
317
The Rowan County Crew
324

Parole e frasi comuni

Informazioni sull'autore (2000)

Born in Austin, Texas, and educated at Harvard University, the University of Texas, and Columbia University, American folklorist Alan Lomax is one of the most dedicated and knowledgeable folk-music scholars of the twentieth century. Lomax became interested in collecting and recording folk songs through the work of his father, John Avery Lomax, a curator at the Library of Congress and a pioneer in the field of folk music. After college, he toured prisons in the South, recording folk song performances for the Archive of American Song of the Library of Congress. During his travels, he met the great blues singer Huddie Ledbetter ("Leadbelly"). Lomax later became responsible for introducing radio audiences to a number of folk and blues artists, including Woody Guthrie and Burl Ives. Between 1951 and 1958, he traveled throughout Europe, recording hundreds of folk songs in England, Scotland, Italy, and Spain. His most important work is, perhaps, "The Folk Songs of North America" (1959). He also published a number of works with his father, including "American Ballads and Folk Songs" (1934) and "Folk Song: USA" (1946). In addition to his work with folk songs, Lomax was very interested in the historical and social origins of jazz, and he wrote a notable biography of the early jazzman Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton entitled "Mister Jelly Roll" (1950).

Informazioni bibliografiche