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INDIA CIVIL not be directed absolutely to report themselves at Allahabad, or told that their pay SERVICE. will begin there. They should be told to report themselves at Bombay, and only if they find no instructions awaiting them there, at Allahabad; and they should be informed that their pay will begin at any place to which they may be directed by the orders awaiting them at Bombay to proceed, and only in the absence of such orders at Allahabad. These instructions are in accordance with the Civil Pension Code, Supplement A., section 2., as to the date from which the pay of a Covenanted Civil Servant upon first arrival in India is to begin.

Destination of selected candidates.

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No. 1,351 T., dated Darjeeling, the 11th September 1877.

From HORACE A. COCKERELL, Esq., Officiating Secretary to the Government of
Bengal, on tour, to the OFFICIATING SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNMENT OF
INDIA, Home Department.

WITH reference to Under Secretary Mr. Neill's letter, No. 582, dated 7th July last, and subsequent telegram of the 29th ultimo, requesting that the services of a Junior Civilian may be placed at the disposal of the Government of India, for employment as an Assistant Commissioner of the third grade in Assam, I am directed to say that the post of Assistant Commissioner was offered to five Junior Civilians, all of whom have declined the offer and intimated that they prefer remaining in Bengal. Under these circumstances, it remains for the Government of India to say whether the refusal of these officers should be accepted, or whether they are, under the terms of their appointment, to be considered as liable to serve in Assam.

Sub-Enclosure 2. in above Enclosure 1.

No. 832, dated Simla, the 11th October 1877.

From ARTHUR HOWELL, Esq., Officiating Secretary to the Government of India,
Home Department, to the SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNMEnt of Bengal.

In reply to your letter, No. 1,351 T., dated the 11th ultimo, reporting that five Junior Civilians have declined the appointment of Assistant Commissioner in Assam, and inquiring whether their refusal should be accepted, I am directed to request that the services of Mr. or Mr. may be placed at the disposal of this Department for employment in Assam.

2. The Government of India regret the necessity which compels the transfer of Civilians from the province which they may have originally selected, but the administration of Assam must be carried on, and it should be borne in mind that the Civil Servants attached to the Lower Provinces have always been available for service in Assam, and that the fact of Assam being formed into a Chief Commissionership does not alter their liability in this respect.

3. Officers whose services may be required in Assam or British Burma should, however, be informed that their transfer is not permanent; that their names will be retained in italics in the civil list of the province from which they are taken; and that whenever their turn for promotion in their old province, may come, they will, if they wish it, be re-transferred to it as soon as arrangements can be made for the conduct of their duties in the non-regulation province to which they may have been deputed. I am to express a hope that His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor will facilitate temporary transfers of this nature, as it is only thus that the administration of small provinces can effectively be carried on, and it is reasonable to expect that the wider range of experience which officers will so acquire will not fail to be beneficial to both provinces.

ENCLOSURE 2.

To his Excellency the Right Hon. the Governor-General of India in Council. MY LORD, India Office, London, 24th January 1878. 1. THE despatch of your Excellency in Council dated 1st November, No. 97 of 1877, on the subject of the destination of candidates selected for the Covenanted Civil Service, has been considered by me in Council.

2. I concur in the opinion expressed by your Lordship in Council that every Civil INDIA CIVIL. Servant is bound to serve wherever the Government, at any period of his career, SERVICE. requires him to go. This should be laid down as a general rule.

3. The above general rule will be communicated to the selected candidates, and at Destination the same time they will be informed that, in the ordinary course, appointment to of selected the Lower Provinces of Bengal includes liability to service in Assam and Burma; candidates. to North-west Provinces and Punjab, liability to service in Oudh and Sind; to Madras, liability to service in Burma; and to Bombay, liability to service in the Central Provinces.

4. Further, I am of opinion that no Civil Servant should, as a general rule, be sent to the outlying provinces above named (Assam, Burma, Sind, &c.) until he has passed his departmental examinations in his own Presidency.

I have, &c.

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In compliance with the request contained in the above letter the following Notice was communicated to the Candidates selected in 1878 for the Civil Service of India, at the time of their making their choice of Presidency.

Though the Government of India will, as far as possible, respect the choice of presidency originally made, and will be prepared to consider each officer's convenience, the first election and allotment cannot be final and absolute, but must be subject to the exigencies of the public service.

Every Civil Servant is bound to serve wherever the Government, at any period of his career, requires him to go.

In the ordinary course, appointment to the Lower Provinces of Bengal includes liability to service in Assam and Burma; to the North-West Provinces and Punjab, liability to service in Oudh and Sind; to Madras, liability to service in Burma; and to Bombay, liability to service in the Central Provinces.

The deputation of civilians to British Burma or to Assam will not necessarily be permanent. When so deputed their names will be retained in italics in the civil list of the province from which they are taken, and whenever their turn for promotion in their old province may come, they will, if they so wish, be allowed to return to it, as soon as the public interests admit of their re-transfer.

A Civil Servant will not as a rule be sent to the provinces above-named (Assam, Burma, Sind, &c.) until he has passed his departmental examinations in his own presidency.

Civil Service Commission,

27th May 1878.

The Secretary, Civil Service Commission, to the Under Secretary

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24th May 1878.

I AM directed by the Civil Service Commissioners to request that Prizes at the they may be informed whether they are right in supposing it to be the Periodical and wish of the Secretary of State for India in Council that the usual prizes Final Examishould be offered at the half-yearly examinations to be competed for by the 13 candidates who are now being selected for the Civil Service of India, independently of those who will be selected in July.

If the two sets of candidates were to pass the half-yearly examinations separately, the Commissioners apprehend that no question would arise, but the case may be different if, as they propose, both are examined together. It is obvious, however, that in this case the candidates of July, being selected at an earlier age, as well as at a later date, would be at some disadvantage in a common competition for the same prizes.

As the Commissioners are desirous, if possible, to make the usual announcement on the subject in the "Instructions to Candidates," which should be issued in a few days, they would be greatly obliged by an early answer to their inquiry.

I have, &c.

nations.

INDIA CIVIL
SERVICE.

Prizes at the
Periodical and
Final Exami-

nations.

The Under Secretary of State, India Office, to the Secretary, Civil
Service Commission.

SIR,

5th June 1878. I AM directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 24th of May relative to the question of whether prizes are to be offered to the candidates for the Civil Service who have been selected at the recent examination, and to those who will be selected in July.

In reply, I am directed to state that a suitable proportion of the usual prizes should be given to the candidates who have been selected under the old system, but that to those to be selected in July and hereafter, and who will have to pass the period of probation at Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, or one of the Scotch Universities, I do not propose that prizes shall be given, with the exception, perhaps, of prizes at the final examination.

SIR,

I am, &c.

The Secretary, Civil Service Commission, to the Under Secretary of State, India Office.

19th June 1878.

I AM directed by the Civil Service Commissioners to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 5th instant, on the subject of the prizes to be offered to the candidates for the Civil Service of India who have been selected at the recent examination, and to those who may be selected in July.

By this letter the Commissioners are informed that it is desired that a suitable proportion of the usual prizes should be ‹ffered to the candidates who have been selected under the old system, but it is not stated in what manner the principle of proportion should be applied, and as the Commissioners are themselves unable to suggest any application of it which would appear to them satisfactory, they desire me to request that they may be favoured with a further expression of the views of the Secretary of State in Council on the subject.

From the same letter the Commissioners learn that to the candidates who are to be selected under the new system it is proposed to give no prizes, except, perhaps, at the final examination. The Commissioners would much regret if it were decided to carry this intention into effect.

They cannot doubt that such a decision would cause considerable disappointment to the candidates, especially as many of them may have seen the "Extracts from Instructions intended to be given to Candidates selected in July 1878," copies of which were forwarded to your Department, as requested in your letter of 19th November 1877, for dissemination at the Universities, which Extracts contained an announcement in the usual terms, that "after each examination prizes will be awarded." Apart, however, from this consideration, the Commissioners would deprecate the abolition of the system of prizes, which was settled after some deliberation by the Secretary of State in Council in the year 1866. They believe that these rewards have been of great use, both in furnishing the selected candidates with an incentive to sustained industry in their special studies throughout the period of their probation, and in affording assistance to deserving students of limited means; and they see no reason to think that under the new system, under which most, if not all, of the candidates may be expected to study at some University, there is likely to be less need either of an incentive to industry or of pecuniary assistance.

If the question is looked at as one of expenditure, it may be proper to recall the fact that the present system, when compared with that which

SERVICE.

it superseded, shows a considerable saving under this head. Not only is INDIA CIVIL
the aggregate sum (1,1557.) now annually offered in prizes for all the
students in respect of all the subjects of study less than that (1,3007.) Prizes at the
which was formerly given at one Presidency College in respect of one Periodical and
group of subjects, viz., the Oriental languages (as may be seen in Final Exami-
C.S.C. to I.O., 23.2.66. detail on reference to the correspondence noted nations.
I.O. to C.S.C., 22.3.66. in the margin), but, owing to the stringency of
C.S.C. to I.O., 26.3.66. the conditions under which the prizes are
I.O. to C.S.C., 7.4.66.
awarded, the amount expended falls consider-
ably short of that which is offered. Thus, in the years 1875, 1876,
and 1877, while the sum annually offered for competition was 1,155l.,
i.e., 4301. for the three intermediate examinations, and 7257. for the
final, the sum annually expended did not amount on the average to
more than 8007., i.e., 300l. for the three intermediate and 500l. for the
final examination. It should be added that, in pursuance of the new
rules respecting the study of vernacular languages, it is proposed at the
first of the intermediate examinations (as shown in the paper herewith
enclosed), and again at the second examination, to offer only ten prizes
of 107. each, instead of fourteen, as at the corresponding examinations
in the previous year.

I have, &c.

ENCLOSURE 1.

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EXTRACT from INSTRUCTIONS to CANDIDATES selected in 1877 respecting their
FIRST PERIODICAL EXAMINATION,

After the examination prizes will be given as follows :

For the greatest proficiency in Law (Jurisprudence)

Law (Notes of Cases, &c.)
Law (Indian)

£

10

10

10

Hindustani

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No prize will be given except for a respectable degree of proficiency; and no candidate will receive a prize who does not exhibit satisfactory proficiency in each of the prescribed subjects.

ENCLOSURE 2.

PROPOSED ANNOUNCEMENT to CANDIDATES selected in 1878 respecting their FIRST
PERIODICAL EXAMINATION.

After the examination prizes will be given as follows:

For the greatest proficiency in Law (Jurisprudence)

£

10

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No prize will be given except for a respectable degree of proficiency; and no candidate will receive a prize who does not exhibit satisfactory proficiency in each of the prescribed subjects.

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1

INDIA CIVIL
SERVICE.

Prizes at the
Periodical and
Final Exami-

nations.

The Under Secretary of State, India Office, to the Secretary, Civil
Service Commission.

SIR,

3rd July 1878. I AM directed by the Secretary of State for India in Council to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th June on the subject of the prizes to be given at the periodical examinations of selected candidates for the Civil Service of India.

2. In reply, I am directed to state that Viscount Cranbrook agrees that prizes shall be offered to the candidates selected in April last in accordance with the proposed announcement, a copy of which is attached to your letter. With respect to candidates to be selected in July and hereafter, he is of opinion that no prizes should be given except at the final examination.

I am, &c.

INDIA

TELEGRAPH

DEPARTMENT.

Competition for twelve appointments.

INDIA TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT.

The Under Secretary of State, India Office, to the Secretary, Civil
Service Commission.

17th May 1878.

SIR,
I AM directed by Lord Cranbrook to transmit the accompanying
conditions of an examination for 12 appointments in the Indian Tele-
graph Department, with a request that you will lay it before Her
Majesty's Civil Service Commissioners, with a view to the necessary
arrangements being made for the conduct of the examination..

The subjects of examination are precisely the same as those specified in the prospectus for the forthcoming examination for admission to the Royal Indian Civil Engineering College; and it is Lord Cranbrook's wish that the two examinations should be held at the same time, but that the names of the competitors for the two services should be kept quite distinct, on account of the candidates for the Indian Telegraph Department being all nominated by the Secretary of State for India, while the examination for admission to the Civil Engineering College is

an open one.

A complete list of the nominated candidates for the Telegraph Department, the number of whom will probably not exceed 25, will be sent to you on or before the 15th June.

ENCLOSURE.

I am, &c.

CONDITIONS of ADMISSION to the TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT of the GOVERNMENT

of INDIA.

1. Nominations will be made by the Secretary of State of candidates to compete for 12 appointments.

2. Nominees must be British born subjects, and must be of not less than 17 nor more than 20 years of age on the 1st day of July 1878.

3. A nominee will be required, immediately after receiving a nomination, to furnish a certificate showing the date of his birth, and he must be passed by the Medical Board of this Office as possessing a constitution sufficiently vigorous to withstand fatigue and exposure in a tropical climate; the medical examination taking place, at his option, either immediately before or immediately after a competitive examination which he will be required to attend, and which will be held in the latter end of June or beginning of July, under the orders of the Civil Service Commissioners, and will embrace the following subjects :

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