The Ornithological Guide ...

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Whittaker, 1835 - 240 pagine
 

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Pagina 18 - And amidst the flashing and feathery foam, The stormy petrel finds a home...
Pagina 123 - ... alarmed at your approach, rapidly hide themselves beneath the flowers and leaves of the water-lily ; and, as the season advances, to find all these objects changed for others of the same kind, but better and brighter, till the swallow and the trout contend, as it were, for the gaudy May-fly, and till, in pursuing your amusement in the calm and balmy evening, you are serenaded by the songs of the cheerful thrush and melodious nightingale, performing the offices of paternal love, in thickets ornamented...
Pagina 123 - How delightful in the early spring, after the dull and tedious time of winter, when the frosts disappear and the sunshine warms the earth and waters, to wander forth by some clear stream, to see the leaf bursting from the purple bud, to scent the odours of the bank perfumed by the violet, and enamelled, as it were, with the primrose and the daisy; to wander upon the fresh turf below the shade of trees, whose bright blossoms are filled with the music of the bee...
Pagina 117 - Forty years long was I grieved with this generation, and said : It is a people that do err in their hearts, for they have not known my ways.
Pagina xiv - Superior heard, run through the sweetest length Of notes, when listening Philomela deigns To let them joy, and purposes, in thought Elate, to make her night excel their day. The...
Pagina 123 - ... waters to view the gaudy flies sparkling like animated gems in the sunbeams, whilst the bright and beautiful trout is watching them from below; to hear the twittering of the water-birds, who, alarmed at your approach, rapidly hide themselves beneath the flowers and leaves of the water-lily ; and as the season advances, to find all these objects changed for others of the same kind, but better and brighter, till the swallow and the trout contend as it •were for the gaudy...
Pagina xv - BIBD of the broad and sweeping wing, Thy home is high in heaven, Where wide the storms their banners fling, And the tempest clouds are driven. Thy throne is on the mountain top ; Thy fields, the boundless air ; And hoary peaks, that proudly prop The skies, thy dwellings are.
Pagina xvi - The stately sailing swan Gives out his snowy plumage to the gale : And arching proud his neck , with oary feet Bears forward fierce , and guards his osier-isle , Protective of his young.
Pagina 152 - Mudie paints; other authors give the husk, Mudie the kernel. We most heartily concur with the opinion expressed of this work by Leigh Hunt (a kindred spirit) in the first «w numbers of his right pleasant London Journal. The descriptions of Bewick, Pennant...
Pagina 26 - The naturalist has no desire to know the opinions or conjectures of the philologer : the botanist looks upon the astronomer as a being unworthy of his regard : the lawyer scarcely hears the name of a physician without contempt...

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