Korea's Future and The Great Powers

Copertina anteriore
Nicholas Eberstadt, Nick Eberstadt, Richard J Ellings
University of Washington Press, 2001 - 361 pagine
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The eventual reunification of the Korean Peninsula will send political and economic reverberations throughout Northeast Asia and will catalyze the struggle over a new regional order among the four great powers of the Pacific—Russia, China, Japan, and the United States. Korea’s Future and the Great Powers addresses the vital issues of how to achieve a stable political order in a unified Korea, how to finance Korean economic reconstruction, and how to link Korea into a cooperative framework of international diplomatic relations.

 

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Indice

Introduction
1
Conflict and Cooperation The Pacific Powers and Korea
51
Discerning North Koreas Intentions
88
China and Korean Reunification A Neighbors Concerns
107
Japan and the Unification of Korea Challenges for US Policy Coordination
125
Russia Korea and Northeast Asia
164
Economic Strategies for Reunification
191
The Role of International Finance in Korean Economic Reconstruction and Reunification
229
The PostKorean Unification Security Landscape and US Security Policy in Northeast Asia
251
Negotiating Korean Unification Options for an International Framework
297
A Policy Agenda for Achieving Korean Reunification
303
Assessing Interests and Objectives of Major Actors in the Korean Drama
315
About the Editors and Contributors
343
Index
349
Copyright

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Informazioni sull'autore (2001)

Russ Christensen has spent over four years with the Pa-O in the Mae Hong Son area of northern Thailand. Sann Kyaw, and ethnic Pa-O, completed two years at the University of Mandalay before the universities were closed in 1988.

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