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it giveth sentence it doth it by virtue of the Pope's authority, derived from God. And for these reasons, the good doctors have subjected the Council's authority to the Pope's, as wholly depending on it, without which it hath not the assistance of the Holy Ghost, nor infallibility, nor power to bind the Church, but as it is granted by him alone, to whom Christ hath said, “ Feed my sheep.

Such was the discourse of Laynez, the General of the Jesuits, on the 20th of October, 1562, as given by Polano in his History of the Council of Trent. The drift of the whole speech is to concentrate all authority in the Pope ; and to make the Council a mere puppet-an inanimate" image," a lifeless statue, which could only' speak as breath was put into it.'

In another speech delivered on the 16th of June, 1563, Laynez contended that Christ having power to dispense from every law, the Pope, his Vicar, had the same.' He also defended the abuses of the Court of Rome, which it was wished to reform, saying, that ' the disciple not being above his master, nor the servant above his Lord, it followed that the Council had no authority to interfere in this reform.' The reform effected by the Council was to be an imaginary reform. The Council itself was to be an image,

an image made to the Pope.' Accordingly, Laynez and the Pope's Legates are represented in Scripture as saying to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the Beast which had the wound by a sword and did live.

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CHAPTER III.

THE POPE'S LEGATES AND THE JESUITS HAVE POWER TO PUT

BREATH INTO THE COUNCIL OF TRENT, THAT THE COUNCIL OF TRENT SHOULD BOTH SPEAK, AND CAUSE AS MANY AS WILL NOT WORSHIP THE COUNCIL TO BE KILLED.

AND HE HAD POWER TO GIVE LIFE (BREATH OR SPIRIT) UNTO THE IMAGE OF THE BE ST, THAT THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST SHOULD BOTH SPEAK

AND CAUSE THAT AS MANY AS WOULD NOT WOR

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SHIP THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST
KILLED."— Verse 15.

The Greek word averpa, which is translated · life,' is more properly 'breath' or 'spirit.' The Council of Trent has · breath' given to it. · The Council,' says the Bishop of Five Churches, seemed to consist not of men, but of Images, such as Dædalus made, that moved by nerves which were none of their own. They were hireling Bishops, who, as Country Bagpipes, could not speak but as BREATH WAS PUT INTO THEM.

The Council has not only · breath,' but 'spirit' put into it. It professes to ' speak' under

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the influence and guidance of the Holy Spirit. But what says the Bishop of Five Churches? The Holy Ghost had nothing to do in this assembly; all the counsels there given proceeded from human policy, and tended only to maintain the Pope's immoderate and shameful domination. Answers were expected from thence, as from the oracles of Delphos and Dodona. The Holy Ghost, which (as they boast) doth govern their Counsels, was sent from thence in a postilion's cloak-bag, which in case of any inundations could not come thither (a thing most ridiculous !) until the waters were assuaged! So it came to pass that the SPIRIT was not upon the waters, as in Genesis, but by the water's side ! O monstrous extraordinary madness! Nothing could be ratified which the Bishops (as if they had been the common people) did Decree, unless the Pope made himself the author of it.''

But the Image of the Beast not only has · breath' or spirit' put into it, but • speaks.' It is said of the Second Beast, the Janissaries of His Holiness, that ' he had power to give breath (or spirit) unto the Image of the Beast, that the Image of the Beast should speak.' The Image is not only a ' breathing,' but a 'speakingImage. We have heard of a French artist, who has made a figure of Napoleon breathing. The figure, however, could not speak. But the Council of Trent, the Image made to the Pope, has breath put into it, that it should speak.? The Council has spoken,' and the whole world has heard its decrees! It has passed sentence upon Pro

US.

testantism-a final, decisive, summary sentence, from which there is no appeal. Let us hear what Dr. Doyle says upon this subject, in his pastoral address of 1825, which is a striking comment upon the words of St. John. "You are to avoid these disputes,' (respecting Protestantism,) because by entering into them, you appear to call in question those truths, which are already defined by the Holy Ghost and by

There can be no new hearingno new trial. By the Church at Trent sentence was passed, and the matter set at rest for ever. The cause is concluded. It can never be revived. It hath seemed good to the Holy Ghost and to our Fathers so to determine. There can be no rehearing of the case.' 'The Church at Trent invited the Heretics of the 16th century (those who broached or renewed the errors which are now revived) to plead their own cause before the Council: these blind and obstinate men refused to do so : but their cause was examined fully and dispassionately: sentence at length was passed, and the matter set at rest for ever. CAUSA FINITA EST.' The IMAGE OF THE BEAST has spoken.'

• There can be no new hearing—no new trial. Sentence has been passed, and the matter set at rest for ever. The cause is concluded. It can never be revived. It hath seemed good so to determine. There can be no re-hearing of the case.' The decrees of the IMAGE are enforced with an authoritative, but most awful, imprecation upon all who shall presume to violate them-Let them be accursed !

The letter of Dr. Doyle, to which we have alluded,

was published in August, 1825, on the following occasion. The priests had interrupted the clergy at the meeting of the Bible Societies, in consequence of which interruption, a challenge was sent to them from five Protestant Clergymen to meet them, and discuss the right and duty of reading the Scriptures. Upon this, Dr. Doyle wrote a letter to his priests to forbid the discussion, which letter contains the following passage:

' The errors maintained by the members of the Bible Society regard either the primary articles of the Christian faith, or truths already defined by the Church. Both these truths are immoveably and definitively settled: God or his Church, or rather both, have spoken : and as St. Augustine said to the Pelagians- The cause is concluded; I wish the error would at length cease.'---'Causa finita est ; utinam finiretur aliquando error.' There can be no new hearing—no new trial. The Church at Trent invited the Heretics of the 16th century (those who broached or renewed the errors which are now revived) to plead their own cause before the Council : these blind and obstinate men refused to do so, but their cause was examined fully and dispassionatelysentence at length was passed, and the matter set at rest for ever. Causa finita est. It can never be revived. It hath seemed good to the Holy Ghost and to our Fathers so to determine. There can be no rehearing of it. There is no higher tribunal constituted by God, no one or many to whom a new issue could be directed for trial; whosoever does not hear

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