Castle Rackrent. Essay on Irish bulls. The modern Griselda. v. II. Belinda, vol. 1.-v. III. Belinda, vol. 2-v. IV. Leonora. Letters on several subjects. An essay on self-justification.-v. V. Popular tales.-v. VI. Popular tales. Dramas.-v. VII. Tales of fashionable life, vol.1-v.VIII.Tales of fashionable life, vol. 2.-v. IX. Tales of fashionable life, vol.3.-v. X. Tales of fashionable life, vol.4.-v. XI. Patronage, vol.1.-v. XII. Patronage, vol.2.-v. XIII. Harrington. Ormond.-v. XIV. Ormond

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R. Hunter; Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy [&c., &c.], 1825
 

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Pagina 208 - Adam the goodliest man of men since born His sons, the fairest of her daughters Eve.
Pagina 163 - But first, whom shall we send In search of this new world ? whom shall we find Sufficient ? who shall tempt with wandering feet The dark, unbottom'd, infinite abyss, And through the palpable obscure find out His uncouth way...
Pagina 213 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit; Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit; For a patriot, too cool; for a drudge, disobedient; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor.
Pagina 318 - If of these the whole power is not accurately delivered, it must be remembered, that while our language is yet living, and variable by the caprice of every one that speaks it, these words are hourly shifting their relations, and can no more be ascertained in a dictionary, than a grove, in the agitation of a storm, can be accurately delineated from its picture in the water.
Pagina 16 - Murtagh knew well how to enforce; so many days' duty work of man and horse, from every tenant, he was to have, and had, every year; and when a man vexed him, why the finest day he could pitch on, when the cratur was getting in his own harvest, or thatching his cabin, Sir Murtagh made it a principle to call upon him and his horse : so he taught 'em...
Pagina 121 - ... personal identity. Philosophers will not perhaps be so ready as his lordship has been to call this a blunder of the first magnitude. Those who have never been initiated into the mysteries of metaphysics may have the presumptuous ignorance to fancy that they understand what is meant by the common words 7, or me ; but the able metaphysician knows better than lord Orford's changeling how to prove, to our satisfaction, that we know nothing of the matter. " Personal identity," says Locke, " consists...
Pagina 16 - ... man and horse, from every tenant, he was to have, and had, every year; and when a man vexed him, why the finest day he could pitch on, when the cratur was getting in his own harvest, or thatching his cabin, Sir Murtagh made it a principle to call upon him and his horse: so he taught 'em all, as he said, to know the law of landlord and tenant.
Pagina 122 - If the same Socrates waking and sleeping do not partake of the same consciousness, Socrates waking and sleeping is not the same person; and to punish Socrates waking for what sleeping Socrates thought, and waking Socrates was never conscious of, would be no more of right than to punish one twin for what his brother-twin did, whereof he knew nothing, because their outsides were so like that they could not be distinguished; for such twins have been seen.
Pagina 162 - To live a life half dead, a living death, And buried; but, O yet more miserable! Myself my sepulchre, a moving grave ; Buried, yet not exempt, By privilege of death and burial, From worst of other evils, pains, and wrongs; But made hereby obnoxious more To all the miseries of life, Life in captivity Among inhuman foes.
Pagina 345 - And thou the accuser. Thus it shall befall Him who, to worth in woman overtrusting, Lets her will rule : restraint she will not brook; And, left to herself, if evil thence ensue, She first his weak indulgence will accuse.

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