Outlines of mineralogy, Volume 2

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Printed by N. Bliss, for J. Parker, and R. Bliss, 1809
 

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Pagina 76 - African rivers often yield sixty grains in not more than five pounds weight, which is in the proportion of more than fifty times as much, while the Australian rivers have been known to yield considerably more.
Pagina 47 - The Bovey coal is commonly of a chocolate-brown, and sometimes almost black. The quality and texture of it are various in different strata; from some of these, it is obtained in the form of straight flat pieces, three or four feet in length, resembling boards, and is therefore called Board Coal. Others have an oblique, wavy, and undulating texture, and, as Dr. MILLES observes, have a strong resemblance to the roots of trees, from which, most probably, this sort has in a great measure been formed....
Pagina 194 - Aristotle, who makes a distinction between the compound resulting from the mixture of copper and calamine and that resulting from the mixture of copper and tin.
Pagina 183 - ... vegetables, which enables it to dissolve the iron in the rocks over which it flows, or over which it stands. This water having reached the lower points of the country, or being poured into hollows, becomes stagnant, and by...
Pagina 131 - Nigro plumbo ad fistulas laminasque utimur , laboriosius in Hispania eruto , totasque per Gallias : sed in Britannia summo terrae corio adeo large , ut lex ultro dicatur, « ne plus certo modo fiat ». Nigri generibus haec sunt nomina: ovetanum, caprariense, oleastrense.
Pagina 8 - ... argillaceous or marly stone, and is itself mixed with a considerable portion of the same earth, exhibits a very great peculiarity in its structure. Though it forms a mass extremely compact, the salt is found to be arranged in round masses of five or six feet in diameter, not truly spherical, but each compressed by those that .surround it, so as to have the shape of an irregular polyhedron. These are formed of concentric coats, distinguishable from...
Pagina 82 - The gold is then pure, except an admixture of silver, and perhaps a little iridium or platinum. The button is again rolled out into a ribbon about as thick as ordinary letter paper, and boiled in nitric acid, which dissolves the silver and leaves the gold pure, which is weighed, and the amount which it has lost gives an exact measure of the quantity of impurity in the original bar. Thus, if the piece assayed weighs nine grains, then ninetenths of the bar is pure gold ; and the clerk of the deposit...
Pagina 99 - Tconsidered as very probable, especially when supported by the account which is given' of some of the savage tribes in the north western parts of America ; who, though little civilized in most respects, have applied to domestic purposes the native copper with which their country abounds ; and, from one of the uses to which they have applied it, are commonly denominated copper-knived Indians. Lucretius alludes to the early use of copper in these words : Prior...
Pagina 190 - O06 of its weight. Its solution in nitric and muriatic acids was colourless. It was composed of...
Pagina 98 - Oural mountains, in about the sixtieth degree of latitude : the matrix of copper is a granular white carbonate of lime. Native copper is also met with in quartz, through which it often penetrates in the form of irregularly prismatic bars ; in serpentine ; in varieties of basalt and porphyry ; and in granite. According to Mr. Jameson it is frequently found in great masses dispersed over the surface of the earth, in uncultivated countries ; hence Werner conjectures that it was the first ^etal worked...

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