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germ-plasm. Evolution is always slow, and, for that

very reason, sure.

If these conclusions are correct, they have an important practical bearing. Struggle and effort are essential to progress. Not inborn talent alone, but the use which one makes of it, counts in evolution. The effects of use and disuse are cumulative. The hard-fought battle of past generations becomes an easy victory in the present, just because of the strength acquired and handed down from the past struggle. Persistent variation toward evil is in time weeded out by natural selection. And, while evil remains in the world, we are to lay up stores of strength for ourselves and our descendants by sturdily fighting it. But the effects of right living through a hundred generations are not overcome by the criminal life of one or two. Evil surroundings weigh more in producing criminals than heredity, and their children are not irreclaimable.

The struggles and victories of each one of us encourage the rest. There is, to borrow Mr. Huxley's language, not only a survival of the fittest, but a fitting of as many as possible to survive. And in the midst of the hardest struggle there is the peace which comes from the assurance of a glorious triumph.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]

Condensed Chart of Development of the Main Line of the Animal Kingdom leading to Man.

Amphibian.

Reptile.

Ape.

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KNOWLEDGE, value of, 150, 229, | Prayer, 259

242

LAW, Divine, 245

Locomotion and nervous develop-
ment, 61. See also Muscular
System

Love, 139, 180, 243

MAGOSPHÆRA, 40

Mammals, 85, 92; oviparous, 86;
marsupial, 87; placental, 88;
temporarily surpassed by rep-
tiles, 195

Man, 210, 219; anatomical char-
acteristics, 92; mental and
moral characteristics, 99, 112,
147, 150, 219, 242; relation to
nature, 210; animal, 213;
moral, 220; religious, 224;
hero, 227; future, 228, 231
Materialism, 165

Mesoderm, 45

Mind, 115, 144; amoeba, 33

Mollusks, 58, 106

Primates, 91

Productiveness and prospective-
ness, 193, 200, 202
Protoplasm, 32, 34
Protozoa, 39

REFLEX action, 125, 135, 146
Religion, 166, 224, 262
Reproduction, 309; amœba, 32,
35; hydra, 38; magosphæra,
40; volvox, 41; turbellaria,
50; annelids, 62; insects, 66;
vertebrates, 73. See also Size
and Surface and Mass
Respiration, amoeba, 35; worms,
48, 63; insects, 66; verte-
brates, 77, 84

SEQUENCE of functions, 80, 109,
174, 309; condensed history of,
100, 152, 221; reversal of, 154,
205

Sexual reproduction, 33, 37, 41
Sin, 245

Motives, 136, 148; sequence of, Size, 35, 51, 72, 76, 89, 214

143

Muscular system, 309; hydra,
38; worms, 62; insects, 68;
vertebrates, 73, 108, 216

NÄGELI, 288

Natural selection, 12, 152, 278
Nature, 9, 28

Neo-Darwinians and Neo-Lam-
arckians, 296

Nervous system, 102; hydra, 38;
turbellaria, 48; mollusks, 59;
annelids, 63; insects, 69; ver-
tebrates, 74
Notochord, 74, 79

ONTOGENESIS, 26

PHYLOGENESIS, 26, 100, 310
Placenta, 88

Skeleton, 58, 74; mollusks, 59;
insects, 65, 67, 71; vertebrates,
74, 82

Social life, 182, 217
Socrates, 161, 189, 200
Specialization, 236, 239

Struggle for existence, 11, 158,
277; mitigation of, 217
Surface and mass, 35, 50

TISSUES, 42
Turbellaria, 46, 102
VERTEBRATES, 73, 81,
primitive, 77
Volvox, 40

WEISMANN, 290

Will, 136

Worms, 56; schematic, 52

107;

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