Holding Up a Mirror: How Civilizations Decline

Copertina anteriore
Imprint Academic, 1996 - 652 pagine
According to Glyn-Jones, the central dilemma of history is this: the dynamic that promotes economic prosperity arises largely from the conviction that the material world alone constitutes true 'reality'. Yet that self-same dynamic, developing into a critique of all belief in the supernatural as at best superflous, and at worst a damaging superstition, undermines the authority of moral standards and thus leads eventually to the destruction of the very security, prosperity and artistic achievement on which civilizations rest their claim to greatness. Focussing on dramatic entertainment as the barometer of social change, this book shows in vivid detail how the thesis worked itself out in four different civilizations, those of Greece, Rome and medieval Christendom and now in our own contemporary society.
 

Cosa dicono le persone - Scrivi una recensione

Nessuna recensione trovata nei soliti posti.

Sommario

Preface
1
Does It Matter Which is Which?
7
the Sixth to Fourth Centuries in Greece
20
the Fourth to Second Centuries
37
the Second and First Centuries
50
the Roman World Third Century BC to First AD
67
Pity and Fear? Or Brutalization? The Rise and Rise of the Amphitheatre
87
the Late Republic and Early Empire
106
the Sixteenth to midSeventeenth Centuries
243
the midSeventeenth to Late Eighteenth Centuries
274
the Eighteenth Century
304
the Nineteenth Century
334
the Early Twentieth Century
363
the Late Twentieth Century
393
Art for Arts Sake
429
Where the Rainbow Ends
466

the Late Republic and the Early Empire
121
the Second and Third Centuries
146
the Fourth to Sixth Centuries
163
the Sixth to Tenth Centuries
187
the Tenth to Twelfth Centuries
205
the Twelfth to Fifteenth Centuries
220
Cause and Effect
507
Straws in the Wind
544
Notes
583
Bibliography
619
Copyright

Altre edizioni - Visualizza tutto

Parole e frasi comuni

Informazioni bibliografiche