Heath's Historical Annual; Or, The Great Civil War of Charles I.: And the Parliament Rev. Richard Cattermole ...

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Longman, 1842 - 287 pagine
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Pagina 246 - Church government by Archbishops, Bishops, their Chancellors and Commissaries, Deans, Deans and Chapters, Archdeacons, and all other ecclesiastical officers depending on that hierarchy...
Pagina 215 - We the inhabitants, magistrates, officers, and soldiers, within this garrison of Gloucester, unto his majesty's gracious message return this humble answer : That we do keep this city, according to our oaths and allegiance, to and for the use of his majesty and his royal posterity : and do accordingly conceive ourselves wholly bound to obey the commands of his majesty, signified by both houses of parliament : and are resolved, by God's help, to keep this city accordingly.
Pagina 51 - Certainly," says Whitlocke,** with his usual candor, "never any man acted such a part, on such a theatre, with more wisdom, constancy, and eloquence, with greater reason, judgment, and temper, and with a better grace in all his words and actions, than did this great and excellent person; and he moved the hearts of all his auditors, some few excepted, to remorse and pity.
Pagina 109 - Haslerig: which were so completely armed, that they were called by the other side the regiment of lobsters, because of their bright iron shells, with which they were covered, being perfect cuirassiers; and were the first seen so armed on either side...
Pagina 226 - ... engaged his person in those troops, which he thought by the forwardness of the commanders to be most like to be farthest engaged : and in all such encounters he had about him an extraordinary cheerfulness, without at all affecting the execution that usually attended them ; in which he took no delight...
Pagina 63 - Tower-hill the fatal stroke which severed the wisest head in England from the shoulders of the Earl of Strafford, whose crime coming under the cognizance of no human law, or statute, a new one was made, not to be a precedent, but his destruction.
Pagina 229 - In the morning before the battle, as always upon action, he was very cheerful, and put himself into the first rank of the lord Byron's regiment, who was then advancing upon the enemy, who had lined the hedges on both sides with musketeers; from whence he was shot with a musket in the lower part of the belly, and in the instant falling from his horse, his body was not found till the next morning; till when, there was some hope he might have been a prisoner; though his nearest friends, who knew his...
Pagina 227 - ... that the very agony of the war, and the view of the calamities and desolation the kingdom did and must endure, took his sleep from him, and would shortly break his heart.
Pagina 227 - When there was any overture or hope of peace, he would be more erect and vigorous, and exceedingly solicitous to press anything which he thought might promote it ; and sitting among his friends, often after a deep silence, and frequent sighs...
Pagina 228 - ... the which (though not ordered) when very many did, the Lord Falkland (who believed the service itself not to be of that moment, and that an honourable and generous person could not have stooped to it for any recompense), instead of moving his hat, stretched both his arms out, and clasped his hands together upon the crown of his hat, and held it close down to his head ; that all men might see how odious that flattery was to him, and the very approbation of the person, though at that time most...

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