Livy, Volume 3

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Harper & Brothers, 1844

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Pagina 295 - I have no kind of rivalry to apprehend : for he has attained to such a height of eminence, that he will not suffer me at any time to be placed on a level with him, however anxiously I may wish it ; and that I do wish it, I will by no means dissemble. He has, therefore, represented himself as a man of gravity and wisdom, who has passed through every degree of public honours ; and me, as below the age even of his son ; as if ambition extended not its views beyond the present life, and did not look...
Pagina 315 - ... and entreated both the King and the Roman general to put an end to hostilities ; and to consider, in a favourable light, the liberty which the Epirots took in mediating between them. Publius Sempronius dictated the terms of peace ; — That the Parthinians, and Dimallum, and Bargulum, and Eugenium, should be under the dominion of the Romans ; that Atintania should be ceded to the Macedonian, if, on sending ambassadors, he should obtain it from the senate. Peace being agreed to on these terms,...
Pagina 297 - In fact even though the war were not to be brought to a speedier conclusion by the method which I propose, still it would concern the dignity of the Roman people, and their reputation among foreign kings and nations, that we should appear to have spirit, not only to defend Italy, but to carry our arms into Africa; and that it should not be spread abroad, and believed, that no Roman general dared what Hannibal had dared ; and that, in the former Punic War, when the contest was about Sicily, Africa...
Pagina 273 - Never did I imagine that I should be in want of language to address my own army : not that I ever gave more attention to words than to business ; for, having lived in camps almost from my childhood, I was ever well acquainted with the soldier's way of thinking. But, with what sentiments, or in what terms, I should speak to you, I am entirely at a loss. I know not even what appellation I ought to give you. Can I call you countrymen, who have revolted from your country ; or soldiers, who have renounced...
Pagina 172 - ... still, though no violence should take place, that the proceedings formed a most hateful precedent; for that the honours due to valour were being sought by fraud and perjury. That on one side stood the legionary troops, on the other the marines, ready to swear by all the gods what they wished, rather than what they knew, to be true, and to involve in the guilt of perjury not only themselves and their own persons, but the military standards, the eagles, and their solemn oath of allegiance. That...
Pagina 314 - On coming to the King at Pergamus, he received them kindly, conducted them to Pessinus in Phrygia, delivered to them the sacred stone, which the natives said was the mother of the gods, and desired them to convey it to Rome. Marcus Valerius Falto, being sent homeward before the rest, brought an account that they were returning with the goddess ; and that the best man in Rome must be sought out to pay her the due rites of hospitality. Quintus...
Pagina 367 - When the Carthaginian camp was seen from the walls of the city, what vows were then offered up by each particular person, and by the whole body of the people ! How often, in their assemblies, were their hands stretched out towards heaven, and exclamations heard — O ! will that day ever arrive, when we shall see Italy cleared of the enemy, and blessed once more with the enjoyment of peace ? That now, at length, in the sixteenth year, the gods had granted their wish, and yet not the slightest proposal...
Pagina 379 - Events less correspond to men's expect" ations in war, than in any other case whatever. " Even supposing that you should gain the victory " in battle, the proportion of glory which you " would thereby acquire, in addition to what you " may now securely enjoy on granting peace, " would be, by no means commensurate to that " which you must lose, should any misfortune " happen to you. The chance of but a single " hour may destroy, at once, both the honours " which you have attained, and those for which...
Pagina 367 - ... by each particular person, and by the whole body of the people ! How often, in their assemblies, were their hands stretched out towards heaven, and exclamations heard — O ! will that day ever arrive, when we shall see Italy cleared of the enemy, and blessed once more with the enjoyment of peace ? That now, at length, in the sixteenth year, the gods \ had granted their wish, and yet not the slightest proposal had been made, of returning thanks to th'e gods. So deficient are men in gratitude,...
Pagina 129 - ... banquet is prepared, and ready this day, at my house. When you shall have indulged plentifully in food and wine, the same cup that will be given to me shall go round. That cup will save our bodies from torture, our minds from insult, our eyes and ears from the sight and hearing of all the cruelties and indignities that await the conquered. There will be persons in readiness to throw our lifeless bodies on a large pile kindled in the court-yard of the house. This way alone conducts us to death...

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