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Indeed every station has its proper duties, and a man may serve God in almost any one; provided he do not officiously intrude himself into it. Saints in Cassar's household had employments that differed from those of saints in an obscure village. The Proconsul Paulus had duties to perform, of another nature than those of the Aposde Paul. David " served his gene"ration, by the will of God," as king of Israel; Daniel as prime minister of the Babylonian, and afterwards of the Persian, monarchy; and Nehemiah as governor of Judea. Thus christians may serve God as senators, magistrates, or ministers of state; or as kings or emperors, if properly called to it. A prophet may deliver the Lord's message in the plainest language to the proudest monarch; and Paul the prisoner was performing his duty when he caused has wicked judge to tremble by his faithful admonitions.

But surely if the apostles would not "leave the "word of God to serve tables," though a very good work in itself, ministers of the gospel ought not to intermit their important labours to dispute about politicks or to attempt the reformation or subversion of governments, or to unite with heretical, infidel, or irreligious persons, because their sentiments coincide in these secular concerns. They seem to have nothing, to do in such questions, but to instruct the people from the word of God, in this, as well as other parts of their duty; to set them an example of a quiet and peaceable behaviour, and to assist their prayers for kings and all in authority.

Nor should private christians relax their diligence in attending on divine ordinances, mutual edification. und the duties of their several relations in life; to form such associations, or concert such measures, as not only excite the jealously of rulers, but induce the world to conclude that they are as selfish and ambitious as their irreligious neighbours; and in many other ways give the enemies of the gospel an occasion of speaking evil of them, and the holy doctrine they profess. On the contrary, it behoves us in our several stations to support that Government which protects and tolerates us: for "the world lieth in the wicked one," and it is absurd to expect more favour in it than protection and toleration.

We profess to seek heavenly treasures and honours; and we should not seem desirous of the perishing distinctions of this world, which commonly ensnare those who obtain them: if we are christians indeed, we are travelling to heaven; and all our earthly prosperity or adversity will soon be swallowed up in the joys of eternity: if we can do any good by the way, we should readily embrace the opportunity; if any thing contrary to our consciences be required of us, we should meekly refuse compliance; if we be abridged in our civil privileges, or have hard measure from the world, let us not marvel or murmur,, but bear it patiently and cheerfully, as the disciples of a crucified Redeemer. This conduct will most conduce to our comfort and edification; and best " adorn the "gospel of God our Saviour,'* by "putting to silence M the ignorance of foolish men.—"

Though liberty, as distinguished from licentiousness and anarchy, liberty civil and religious, personal and political, be very desirable, even to the utmost extent that human nature in its present state can bear,

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Theological and Literary Book Store,

NO. 52, COIiSEIl OF SECOND AND CHISSUT STREETS,
PHILADELPHIA.

WILLLIAM W- WOODWARD,
PROPOSES TO PRINT BY SUBSCRIPTION,

DISSERTATIONS,

HISTORICAL, CRITICAL, THEOLOGICAL, AND MORAL,...

ON THE
MOST MF.MOHABLE EVENTS OF THE

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS:

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH OF

JAMES SAURIN,

PASTOR OF THE FRENCH CHURCH AT THE HAGUE;

M. ROQUES, OF BASLE,

AND C. S. DE BEAUSOBRE, OF BERLIN;

To which ate Added, OIHCW-tL NOTES, 1LLVSTXAT10NS, AXD CH&ONOLOGICAL ARRAKCFMSKTX;

BY F. A. COX, A. M.

Extract from the London Editor's Proposal.

These discourses were published in Holland nearly a century ago, at the expense of a merchant, whose impression of iheir excellence induced him to devote 100,000 gilders, or nearly Ten Thousand Pound, English to the purpose. It has been a subject of frequent surprize, that a work of such value and magnitude has never been translated into our native language The first folio volume indeed appeared in English in the year 1733, by J. Chambcrlayne, Esq. under the patronage of the Royal Family, and dedicated to Prince Frederick; but the imperfections of that performance, the quaintness of the style, the small portion of the work it embraces, and the total deficiency of plates and illustrations, supersede the necessity of any apology for a new and enlarged translation.

The celebrated Vander Marcs, Lord of Lcur, devoted 25years to the original work, the splendid designs of which, by Hoet, Houbraken, and Picart, are explained at foot, in Greek, Latin, English, French, High and Low Dutch.

and that can consist with God's plan of subordination, which is manifest in all his works and all his word; and though we should aim, by every peaceable and proper method, to promote it in every land: yet w-e should shew a decided preference to tliat liberty which Christ bestows on his redeemed people; for without this, the most celebrated and successful champion for civil liberty must continue for ever the abject slave of sin and Satan.

VII. Lastly, It becomes us to "sanctify the Lord "of hosts himself; and to let him be our fear;" that humbly accepting of his salvation, trusting in his mercy, grace, and providence, committing all our concerns into his hands, valuing nothing in comparison of his love, fearing nothing but his frown; we may make it our great business to glorify him by our worship and obedience. Thus we should seek deliverance from those fluctuating hopes and fears which agitate the minds of others as appearances vary: we should not expect much additional comfort on earth from the most promising changes; nor yield to trepidation or despondency in times of danger or publick calamity; and we should shew that we are "not afraid "of evil tidings, as our hearts are fixed, trusting in "the Lord," "whose kingdom is an everlasting "kingdom, and his dominion endureth to all genera"tions:" that so manifesting that " our minds are "stayed upon God, and kept in perfect peace," when "the hearts of others are moved, as the trees of the "wood arc moved by the wind;" we may convince all around us, that they only are blessed who trust in^ and serve, the Lord.

KND »5T THE THIRD VOLUME.

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