The Book of Nature, Volume 1

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J. & J. Harper, 1828 - 530 pagine
 

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Pagina 15 - Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.
Pagina 32 - While the Particles continue entire, they may compose Bodies of one and the same Nature and Texture in all Ages : But should they wear away, or break in pieces, the Nature of Things depending on them would be changed.
Pagina 469 - And ever against eating cares Lap me in soft Lydian airs Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce In notes, with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out, With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony; That Orpheus...
Pagina 72 - These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens...
Pagina 43 - And to shew that I do not take Gravity for an essential Property of Bodies, I have added one Question concerning its Cause, chusing to propose it by way of a Question, because I am not yet satisfied about it for want of Experiments.
Pagina 32 - And therefore, that Nature may be lasting, the Changes of corporeal Things are to be placed only in the various Separations and new Associations and Motions of these permanent Particles; compound Bodies being apt to break, not in the midst of solid Particles, but where those Particles are laid together, and only touch in a few Points.
Pagina 71 - ... to give light upon the earth, and to rule over the day, and over the night, to be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and for years.
Pagina 507 - He spoke, and headlong from the mountain's height Deep in the roaring tide he plunged to endless night.
Pagina 200 - Pour'd out profusely, silent : join'd to these Innumerous songsters, in the freshening shade Of new-sprung leaves, their modulations mix Mellifluous. The jay, the rook, the daw, And each harsh pipe, discordant heard alone, Aid the full concert ; while the stockdove breathes A melancholy murmur through the whole.
Pagina 460 - Haste thee, nymph, and bring with* thee Jest and youthful Jollity. Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles, Nods and becks, and wreathed smiles, Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek; Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides.

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