Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Volume 8

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Statistical Society of London, 1845
 

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Pagina 147 - Cannot be ill, cannot be good : if ill, Why hath it given me earnest of success, Commencing in a truth ? I am thane of Cawdor : If good, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair And make my seated heart knock at my ribs, Against the use of nature...
Pagina 147 - This supernatural soliciting Cannot be ill ; cannot be good : if ill, Why hath it given me earnest of success Commencing in a truth ? — I am thane of Cawdor : If good, why do I yield to that suggestion...
Pagina 139 - The immortal mind, that hath forsook Her mansion in this fleshly nook : And of those demons that are found In fire, air, flood, or under ground, Whose power hath a true consent With planet, or with element. Sometime let gorgeous Tragedy In scepter'd pall come sweeping by, Presenting Thebes, or Pelops' line, Or the tale of Troy divine; Or what (though rare) of later age Ennobled hath the buskin'd stage.
Pagina 147 - What nothing earthly gives, or can destroy, The soul's calm sunshine, and the heart-felt joy, Is virtue's prize: A better would you fix?
Pagina 140 - I will conclude with that which hath rationem totius, which is, that it disposeth the constitution of the mind not to be fixed or settled in the defects thereof, but still to be capable and susceptible of growth and reformation.
Pagina 139 - Or let my lamp at midnight hour Be seen in some high lonely tower, Where I may oft outwatch the Bear, With thrice-great Hermes, or unsphere The spirit of Plato, to unfold What worlds or what vast regions hold The immortal mind, that hath forsook Her mansion in this fleshly nook...
Pagina 140 - The good parts he hath he will learn to show to the full, and use them dexterously, but not much to increase them : the faults he hath he will learn how to hide and colour them, but not much to amend them : like an ill mower, that mows on still, and never whets his scythe : whereas with the learned man it fares otherwise, that he doth ever intermix the correction and amendment of his mind with the use and employment thereof.
Pagina 147 - tis the price of toil; The knave deserves it, when he tills the soil, The knave deserves it, when he tempts the main, Where folly fights for kings, or dives for gain.
Pagina 140 - Nay further, in general and in sum, certain it is that veritas and bonitas differ but as the seal and the print ; for truth prints goodness, and they be the clouds of error which descend in the storms of passions and perturbations.
Pagina 139 - Epictetus, who went forth one day and saw a woman weeping for her pitcher of earth that was broken, and went forth the next day and saw a woman weeping for her son that was dead, and thereupon said, Heri vidi fragilem frangi, hodie vidi mortalem mori.

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