History of Europe from the Commencement of the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1815, Volume 8

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Admirable ability and skill with which he overcame them
10
Character of Marquess Wellesley
11
Character of his Indian administration
13
Statesmanlike wisdom by which it was characterised
14
Character of Lord Melville
15
His great abilities and vast information on Indian affairs
16
sity of war
17
diate hostilities
18
Rapid effect of Lord Wellesleys administration in improving affairs
19
Successful reduction of the French subsidiary forces at Hyderabad
21
Its great effects in India
22
Wellesley collects an army for the attack of Mysore
23
Tippoos means of defence
24
Progress of General Harriss army
25
Harris
27
A nocturnal attack under Colonel Wellesley is repulsed
28
Assault of Seringapatam
29
Difficulty of keeping any considerable force together in the interior
30
Desperate defence of the mosque
31
Death of Tippoo and his character
32
Immense importance of the blow thus struck
33
Appointment of Colonel Wellesley as governor of Seringapatam
34
Judicious arrangements consequent on the fall of Mysore
35
Alleged priority of the determination to despoil Denmark to the treaty
36
Rise and power of Doondiah Waugh
37
His pursuit and overthrow by Colonel Wellesley
38
Alliances with the Nizam and the Rajah of Tanjore
40
Causes of the rupture with the Mahrattas
44
Character and situation of the Rajah of Berar and of Scindiah
46
And of Holkar
47
Reasons for a Mahratta war Perrons French force
48
VOL VIII
49
Collection of forces and delivery of Poonah by Colonel Wellesley
50
Negotiations with Scindiah and the Rajah of Berar
51
War is at length declared
52
Early history of Lord Lake
53
His character
54
Lord Wellesleys plan of operations
55
Defeat of Perrons force and storming of Allighur
56
Lord Lakes strong opinion of the necessity of European troops in India note
57
Alliance with the Mogul emperor and surrender of the French chiefs
58
Battle and fall of Agra
59
Battle of Laswaree 56 Desperate action which ensued
61
Final victory of the English
62
Conquest of the Cuttack
63
Operations in the Deccan under General Wellesley
64
Movements which led to the battle of Assaye
65
Danger of the British
67
Imminent danger and ultimate victory of the English
68
Results of the battle ib 65 Operations after the battle of Assaye
69
Battle of Argaum
70
Siege and capture of Gawilghur
71
These disasters compel the confederates to sue for peace Its terms
72
Plan of the campaign against Holkar Its errors and early disasters
73
Austrian plan of the campaign
77
Holkars able conduct Defeat of Colonel Fawcett in Bundelcund
78
Advance of Colonel Monsons division
79
His disasters and defeat
80
Desperate action on the Bapnas river
81
Dreadful disasters of the close of the retreat
82
Alarming fermentation through the whole of India
83
Generous conduct and able resolutions of Lord Wellesley and Lord Lake ib 80 Advance of Holkar to Delhi
85
His repulse and retreat
86
Page 83 Glorious victory of the British
87
Pursuit of Holkar to Furruckabad
88
Surprising nightmarch of the British and defeat of Holkar
89
Siege and capture of Dieg
90
Siege and unsuccessful assault of Bhurtpore
91
Repeated assaults on Bhurtpore which are repulsed
92
Final defeat of the British
93
Reasons on both sides for an accommodation with the Rajah of Bhurtpore
94
Peace with the Rajah of Bhurtpore
95
Holkar joins Scindiah being expelled from Bhurtpore
96
Operations in the Cuttack Bundelcund and against Meer Khan
97
Despotic power has ever since been established in France 219
98
Operations against Scindiah who sues for peace and Lord Wellesley returns to England
99
Terms of peace with Scindiah and Holkar
100
Review of Lord Wellesleys administration
101
Vast extension he gave to the British empire in the East
103
Return of Wellington to Europe
104
Proportion of Europeans to Asiatics in the armies of Alexander the Great
105
Analogy between the British empire in India and Napoleons in Europe
108
Their essential point of difference ib 104 Reflections on the rise of the British power in India
109
Causes of this extraordinary progress
111
It was owing to the union of democratic energy with aristocratic foresight
112
Causes of this extraordinary combination
113
Causes which will eventually subvert our Eastern empire
114
Great and lasting benefits it has already produced in human affairs
115
CHAPTER L
117
Plan of uniting all Europe in the Continental System
118
And getting hold of and concentrating their fleets in the French and Flemish harbours
119
Object of the Berlin Decree
122
Orders for its rigorous execution and its evasion in Holland
125
Its rigorous execution in the north of Germany
127
First Order in Council by the British government
128
Reasons which led to a farther and more rigorous measure
129
Orders in Council of 11th November
130
Import of these Orders
131
Milan Decree 17th December 1807 issued by Napoleon
132
Special injury inflicted by them on America
133
Their general injustice
134
Their reaction upon England herself
135
The terms of the Berlin decree
138
The French possessed of no blockading force ib 21 Acquiescence of the neutrals in tbe Berlin decree
139
Napoleons policy in his decrees
140
Reflections on this debate and on the justice of the Orders in Council
141
Which party was the aggressor ?
142
Comparative blame attaching to each party
143
Reflections on the policy of the Orders in Council
144
Jesuits Bark Bill in England
145
Vast ultimate effects of the Continental System
146
Introduction of the system of licenses
147
Evasion of the decrees on both sides by the vast extension of this system
148
Great effects of this system in opening up new markets for British industry
150
Universal joy at Napoleons return to Paris
151
Slavish adulation of the orators in the Senate and Chamber of Deputies
152
Great fête in honour of the Grand Army
153
Suppression of the French Tribunate
154
Reasons of Napoleon for that step
155
Slavish submission with which this change was received in France
156
Servile adulation with which the change was received in the Tribunate
157
Establishment of a censorship of the press
159
Entire prostration of literature and the press ib Identity of the imperial despotism of Napoleon and the democratic tyranny of America note
160
Banishment of Madame de Stael
163
The judges are rendered removable at pleasure
164
Severe decrees against any connivance at English commerce ib 45 Universal thirst for public employment in France
165
Rapid progress of the system of centralisation in France
167
Centralisation of all power in the imperial government ib 48 Policy of the Emperor as regards this
169
He reestablishes titles of honour Principles on which this was founded
170
Reestablishment of hereditary titles of honour
172
Speeches on the subject in the legislative body
173
Endowment of the new peers with revenues from foreign states
174
Readiness with which the old nobles entered into these views
178
Great discontent of the French republicans at the institution of titles of honour
179
Objections felt against it by the republican party
180
Napoleons reasons for disregarding these complaints
181
Rapid progress of court etiquette at Paris ib 59 Advantages of the imperial government
184
Striking account of the public works of France by the minister of the interior
186
Manufacturing and industrial works c
187
Great works in Paris and elsewhere
188
General delirium which it produced
189
Finances of France under the empire ib Budget of 1808 note
190
Despotic character of the new law of high treason
192
History of the French prisons since the Revolution
193
State prisons under Napoleon
194
Trivial offences for which persons were confined in these state prisons
195
Cardinal Paccas account of them ib 72 Extraordinary assemblage of persons in these state prisons
196
Universal extent of Napoleons power and great aggravation this was of his persecutions
197
Universal and slavish obedience to his authority
199
Excessive rigour of the conscription laws
200
Terrible punishments denounced against the refractory
201
Imperial system of education Ecclesiastical schools ib 78 Constitution of the imperial university
202
Lyceums or military academies Their regulations and great importance
203
And entire subjection to the Emperors will
204
Rapid transition from republican to despotic ideas
206
Remarkable difference between the English and French Revolutions in this respect
207
Universal alacrity with which despotism was hailed in France ib 84 Its causes Greater violence and injustice of the French convulsion
208
But this alone will not explain the difference
209
It was not the love of freedom but the desire of elevation which con vulsed France
210
Selfishness generally prevailing was the cause of this ib 88 The principles of freedom never were attended to in the French Revolution
211
It was nothing but a vehement struggle for power
212
General corruption of public opinion which the French Revolution pro duced
213
The democratic party when in power support every abuse because they profit by it
214
Rapid growth of centralisation in this state of public feeling ib 93 Debasing effects of centralisation when generally established
215
Striking opinion of M de Tocqueville on this subject note
216
It was the republicans who destroyed freedom in France
217
But this however great an evil was unavoidable in the state in which France was on the termination of the Revolution
218
and its triumph in France
220
CHAPTER LI
222
General feeling of despondence which prevailed in Great Britain
224
Constitution for the Grandduchy of Warsaw
225
Constitution of the kingdom of Westphalia
226
Oppressive military government of the Confederation of the Rhine and Hanse Towns
228
Fresh requisitions imposed on Prussia and limitation of its regular forces
230
Wise internal measures adopted by the Prussian government
231
First measures of the King of Prussia to restore the public fortunes
232
Accession of Baron Stein to the ministry His firm character and admir able measures
233
Admirable reforms which he introduced in Prussia
234
Various causes of distress in Prussia Stein is exiled
235
History character and great reforms of Scharnhorst
236
His great reforms and admirable system in the army
237
Rise and progress of the Tugendbund and secret societies
238
Generals and officers who secretly joined the Tugendbund
240
Situation statistics and power of Austria
241
She joins the Continental System and obtains the evacuation of Braunau
242
Affairs of Sweden The Swedes are shut up in Stralsund
243
Siege of Stralsund
244
Its fall
245
Capture of the islands of Danholm and Rugen
246
Reasons which led to the Copenhagen expedition ib 24 Uniform hostility of Denmark to Great Britain
248
Resolution of the British cabinet ib 26 Equipment and departure of the expedition
249
Ineffectual negotiation with Denmark
251
Siege of Copenhagen Action of Sir Arthur Wellesley
252
Proclamation of Lord Cathcart on landing in Zealand note ib Answer of the Prince Royal of Denmark note
253
Bombardment of Copenhagen
255
Great sensation excited in Europe by this expedition
256
Justification of it soon afforded by Napoleon ib 33 General feeling in England on the subject
258
Arguments in parliament against the Copenhagen expedition
259
Argument against its necessity
260
Inveteracy of Denmark in consequence of the attack on her
262
Ineffectual mediation of Russia
268
Invasion and conquest of Finland by Russia
274
Union of Parma and Placentia to France Great works at Milan State
280
Universal empire was now openly aimed at by Russia and France
286
Extreme irritation produced at Madrid
292
Measures of the Portuguese government and origin of the Spanish
298
the Queen
300
The Prince of Asturias and Escoiquiz his confidential adviser
301
Escoiquiz opens a negotiation with the French ambassador and the Prince of Asturias writes to Napoleon
302
Treaty of Fontainebleau between Napoleon and Charles IV
304
Which is ratified by Napoleon
305
Convention of Fontainebleau
306
Napoleons perfidious designs both towards Spain and the Prince of the Peace in this treaty
307
His secret instructions to Junot in his invasion of Portugal
308
Extraordinary difficulties of his march through Portugal
310
Conduct of the Portuguese government and situation of Lisbon at this crisis
311
Hesitation of the court and Prince Regent
313
The abandonment of Portugal at last resolved on ib 22 Embarkation of the royal family for Brazil
314
Universal grief with which it was attended
315
Arrival of the French at Lisbon
317
enormous contributions levied by the troops
318
Complete occupation of the kingdom by the French and despair of the inhabitants
321
Arrest of Ferdinand and seizure of his papers
322
Contents of the more important ones
323
Proclamation of the King on the subject and correspondence with Napoleon
324
Cautious conduct of the latter on reading it
325
Entrance of the French troops into Spain
327
The Prince of the Peace does not venture to remonstrate against this in vasion
329
New levy in France Treacherous seizure of Pampeluna ib 37 Of Barcelona
331
Continued advance of the French troops and entry of Murat into Madrid
343
Murat declines to recognise Ferdinand and takes military possession of Madrid
344
General acquiescence in all the demands of the French
346
Napoleon offers the crown of Spain to Louis Buonaparte who declines it and Savary is sent to Madrid
347
Savarys secret instructions and object of his journey
348
He arrives at Madrid and persuades Ferdinand to go to Bayonue
350
Journey of Ferdinand to Burgos at Savarys earnest desire
352
Secret motives of his counsellors in agreeing to his continuing his journey
353
Perfidious assurances of his safety given by Savary ib 57 At length he prolongs his journey to Bayonne
354
Abdication of Charles IV 311
355
Godoy Charles IV and the Queen are sent by Murat to Bayonne
357
Great embarrassment experienced by Napoleon in regard to the Penin sular affairs
358
His admirable letter to Murat portraying his views regarding them note
359
Symptoms of resistance in Spain to the invaders
360
Arrogant conduct of Murat
362
Extreme agitation at Madrid at the approaching departure of the rest of the royal family
364
Severe conflicts in the streets
365
Barbarous massacres subsequently committed by Murat
366
His atrocious cruelty
367
Unjustifiable nature of this step
368
Extreme indignation which this massacre excited in Spain
369
Ferdinand arrives at Bayonne and is kindly received by Napoleon
370
But immediately after is told he must resign the crown ib 72 Arguments of Napoleon to enforce the abdication
372
Answer of Ferdinands counsellors
373
Reply of Napoleon 75 Napoleon sends for Charles IV and has a private conference with
374
Escoiquiz
375
His views as stated to Escoiquiz note
376
The arrival of Charles IV solves the difficulty His reception by Napoleon
377
Ferdinand is forced to resign the crown
379
Ferdinand still refuses to agree to an unconditional resignation
380
Napoleon obtains an unconditional surrender of the throne from Charles IV
381
Secret instructions of Ferdinand to the regency at Madrid
382
The intelligence of the events at Madrid on May 2 compels a resignation of the throne from Ferdinand
383
Ferdinand submits and resigns the crown
384
Napoleon makes Joseph King of Spain and convokes an Assembly of Notables
385
Murats efforts at Madrid to forward these projects
387
house
389
Its apparent wisdom so far as human policy is concerned
393
And the ultimate punishment it brought about ib 92 The passions of the Revolution were the real causes of the disasters both of Europe and France
394
CHAPTER LIII
396
Uniform and singular character of its guerilla warfare
397
Physical conformation of the country which has led to these effects
398
General character of the Peninsula
399
Statistics of Spain and its leading features
400
Great mountainranges of Spain and Portugal
401
Those in the south of Spain
402
Extraordinary resolution with which in every age the Spaniards have defended their cities
403
Peculiarities in the civil history of the Peninsula which have rendered it a divided community
404
It has never been thoroughly amalgamated
405
Effect of these circumstances in promoting the means of internal and separate defence
406
Corruption of the nobility and extent to which entails were carried
407
State of the peasantry
408
Statistical details on this subject
409
The church its influence and character ib 16 Its immense usefulness to the people
410
Its great influence in the Spanish contest
411
Spain was still unexhausted by revolutionary passions
412
Composition and character of the French army at this period
414
Their discipline equipment and efficiency
415
Force and character of the British army
416
Spirit with which it was animated and regarded by the people
417
Character and qualities of the British soldiers
418
Parallel between the British and French troops
419
Important effect of the British officers being exclusively taken from the higher ranks
420
The English soldiers were contented with their lot
421
Which arose from the selfrespect of all classes
422
Severe discipline Corporal punishments which still subsisted ib 29 Physical comforts of the British soldiers
423
General Foys graphic contrast of the English and French soldiers and officers note
424
the Peninsula
425
Fortunate position of the British troops
426
Military force of Spain at the commencement of the contest
427
Character and habits of the officers
428
Military force and physical character of Portugal ib 35 General corruption and abuses in the military establishment
429
Amount quality and disposition of the French army at this period in Spain
430
Progress and early forces of the insurrection
431
Vigorous efforts at first made for carrying on the contest
432
Frightful disorders which signalised the commencement of the insurrec tion in some cities
433
Massacres with which the revolution in Valencia commenced
434
Atrocious cruelty of Calvo and the insurgents
435
Deserved punishment of Calvo and his associates
436
Prudent measures adopted by the nobles at Seville Proceedings of its Junta
437
Fortunate overthrow of tbe extreme democrats
438
Capture of the French fleet at Cadiz
439
Insurrection in Asturias Galicia Catalonia and Aragon
441
Measures of Napoleon in regard to the insurrection
442
Proceedings of the Notables assembled at Bayonne
443
General recognition of Joseph by the Spanish Notables
444
Proclamation of the grandees of Spain to their countrymen note ib Degrading letter of Escoiquiz and Ferdinands counsellors to Joseph note
445
Constitution given at Bayonne by Napoleon to the Spaniards
446
Proceedings of Napoleon Joseph and the Junta of Notables at Bayonne ib 52 New ministry of Joseph and his journey to and arrival and reception at ...
448
Honourable instances of resistance to the general torrent of adulation in his favour among the grandees
449
Memorable answer of the Bishop of Orense to his summons to Bayonne note
450
Universal joy with which the news of the insurrection is received in England
451
Enthusiasın of the popular party in the cause
452
Noble speech of Mr Sheridan on the Spanish war in Parliament ib 57 Reply of Mr Secretary Canning
454
Reflections on this debate
455
Consistence of these views with the true principles of freedom ib 60 Budget for 1808
456
Immense extent of the supplies which were sent out to Spain from Great Britain
457
Beneficial effects with which these efforts were attended
458
Vast preparations of Napoleon for the war against England in the Penin sular barbours
459
CHAPTER LIV
461
Successful operatious of Bessières and Frère in Old Castile and Leon against the insurgents
462
Which had the effect of entirely subduing that part of the country
463
Operations in Aragon First siege of Saragossa ib
464
General concurrence of all classes in the defence
466
Operations of Palafox to relieve the city He is defeated and reenters it
467
First operations of the siege
468
Progress of the besiegers
469
Desperate assault of the town
470
Continued contest in the streets
471
The Spaniards gradually regain the ascendant
472
Operations of Moncey in Valencia
473
Description of Valencia and preparations for its defence
474
Attack on the city Its repulse
475
Progress of the insurrection and partial successes of the patriots in that quarter
476
Advance of Cuesta in Leon on the French communications
477
Operations of Bessières against Blake and Cuesta in Leon
478
Movements on both sides preparatory to a battle
480
Battle of RioSeco
482
Further preparations of Napoleon for the war
483
March of Dupont into Andalusia
484
Capture of the bridge of Alcolea ib 25 Taking and sack of Cordova
485
Accumulation of forces round the invaders
487
Dismay of the Spaniards and irresolution of Dupont
488
Retreat of Dupont to Andujar and Baylen
489
Spanish plan of attack and preparatory movements on both sides
490
Character of Dupont
492
Singular manner in which the armies became interlaced ib 32 Movements which led to the battle of Baylen
493
Battle of Baylen ib 34 Defeat of the French
494
Tardy arrival of Vedel who shares in the disgrace
495
Capitulation of Dupont
496
Immense sensation which it produces in Spain and over Europe
497
Disastrous effect of the delusive opinion entertained of this victory
498
Opinion of Napoleon on this capitulation
499
Shameful violation of the capitulation by the Spaniards
500
And their disgraceful treatment of the prisoners
501
Departure of Joseph from Madrid and concentration of the French troops behind the Ebro
504
Defeat of Schwartz near Casa Mansana
505
Universal spread of the insurrection
506
Defeat of an attempt by the French against Gerona
508
Expedition against Rosas which is defeated
509
Unsuccessful siege of Gerona
510
The siege is raised by the Spaniards from Tarragona ib 50 Universal transports in the Peninsula Entry of the Spanish troops into the capital
512
Neglect of any efficient measures in the general exultation ib 52 Affairs of Portugal and disarming of the Spanish troops in that country
513
Progress of the insurrection
516
The English cabinet resolve on sending succours to Portugal
517
Strange substitution of successive commanders to the British expedition
518
Arrival of the British troops at Mondego Bay and proclamation by Sir A Wellesley
520
Landing of the army
521
March of the British troops to Roliça
522
Advance of the British to attack the French there
523
Combat of Rolica
524
The British advance to Vimeira
526
Sir A Wellesleys plans are overruled by Sir H Burrard
527
Description of the field of battle of Vimeira
528
Positions taken up by the two armies ib 68 Battle of Vimeira
529
Desperate conflict on the left
530
Defeat of the French
531
Sir A Wellesley proposes to follow up the victory
532
But is prevented by Sir Harry Burrard
533
An armistice is concluded
535
Reasons which led to an armistice on both sides ib 75 Convention of Cintra
537
A court of inquiry is held and its results
538
Expedience of the convention at that juncture
540
Napoleons views on that subject
541
Disgraceful revelations which are made at Lisbon of the plunder by all ranks in the French army
542
Enormous extent of the plunder the French superior officers endeavoured to carry off
543
Great part of the plunder is wrested from the French
544
The British troops are placed under the command of Sir John Moore
545
Strength of the united British forces and their advance into Spain
546
Great difficulty in forming a central junta at Madrid
547
Appointment of a central junta at Madrid
548
Miserable condition of the central government and the armies on the Ebro
549
The Marquis Romana obtains information of what is going on in Spain
551
Escape of the Marquis and his troops
552
Extraordinary scene at the embarkation of the troops
553
CHAPTER LV
554
Armaments of Austria and negotiations with that power and the princes of the Rhenish Confederacy
555
Napoleons preparations to meet the danger and great levy by the French government
557
Subsidiary treaty with Prussia
558
Interview at Erfurth with Alexander
559
Its secret object and tenor of the conferences held there
561
Fêtes and spectacles at Erfurth
562
And on the field of Jena
564
Secret views of both parties at the conference
565
Tenor of the conferences held there
566
Concessions made by Napoleon to Russia and Prussia
568
Their differences concerning Napoleons marriage and Turkey
569
Treaty with Prussia and Murat declared King of Naples
570
Napoleon returns to Paris and sets out for the Ebro
571
Immense force there collected by Napoleon
572
Positions and strength of the Spaniards
573
March position and strength of the British army
574
Deplorable division of the British and Spanish troops
575
Movements on the French right before the arrival of Napoleon
576
Check of Castanos at Logrono
577
Defeat of Blake at Durango
578
Position of the French and Spanish armies on Napoleons arrival
579
Actions at Espinosa ib 24 Total defeat of the Spaniards at Reynosa
581
Battle of Burgos and defeat of the Spanish centre ib 26 Movement against Castanos and Palafox
583
Positions of the French and Spanish armies before the battle of Tudela
584
Total defeat of the Spaniards
585
Disorderly and eccentric retreat of the Spanish armies from the Ebro
586
Rapid and concentrated advance of the French armies to adrid
587
Forcing of the Somosierra pass
588
Prodigious agitation at Madrid
589
Capture of the Retiro
590
Capitulation of Madrid
591
Napoleons measures for the tranquillising of Spain
592
Positions of the French corps in the end of December
595
Vast forces at the disposal of the Emperor
596
Bold advance of Sir John Moore
597
Determination of Moore to advance and joy which it diffused through the army
599
Advance to Sabagun on the French line of communication ib 41 Preparations for attacking Soult on the Carrion
600
This movement instantly paralyses the farther advance of the French to the south
601
The Emperor continues the pursuit to Astorga
605
Arrival at Corunna of the troops and the transports from Vigo Bay
611
His grave and veneration with which it is regarded in Spain
617
Reflections on the campaign and effect of Sir John Moores movement
623
Reflections on the character of the British and French armies Superiority
630
Napoleons remonstrances against these measures
637
Amount and distribution of the French forces in Germany in spring 1809
643
Commencement of hostilities by the Austrians
657
The advance of the Austrians almost cuts in two the French army
663
Napoleons address to the German confederates
669
Operations of Davoust and the Archduke Charles in the centre
675
Napoleon gains the victory
681
Great results of these actiuns
687
Important effects of this victory on the Italian campaign
693

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Pagina 601 - I hope the people of England will be satisfied!" "I hope my country will do me justice!
Pagina 601 - NOT a drum was heard, not a funeral note, As his corse to the rampart we hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot O'er the grave where our hero we buried.
Pagina 600 - It is as well as it is. I had rather it should go out of the field with me;" — and in that manner, so becoming to a soldier, Moore was borne from the fight.
Pagina 601 - Few and short were the prayers we said, And we spoke not a word of sorrow ; But we steadfastly gazed on the face that was dead, And we bitterly thought of the morrow.
Pagina 128 - ... any vessel, or the cargo of any vessel, belonging to any country not declared by this order to be subjected to the restrictions incident to a state of blockade...
Pagina 146 - If ever the free institutions of America are destroyed, that event may be attributed to the unlimited authority of the majority, which may at some future time urge the minorities to desperation, and oblige them to have recourse to physical force. Anarchy will then be the result, but it will have been brought about by despotism.
Pagina 129 - And whereas countries not engaged in the war, have acquiesced in the orders of France prohibiting all trade in any articles the produce or manufacture of his Majesty's dominions; and the merchants of those countries have given countenance and effect to those prohibitions, by accepting from persons...
Pagina 128 - ... all trade in articles which are of the produce or manufacture of the said countries or colonies, shall be deemed and considered to be unlawful; and that every vessel trading from or to the said countries or colonies, together with all goods and merchandise on board, and all articles of the produce or manufacture of the said countries or colonies, shall be captured and condemned as prize to the captors.
Pagina 503 - For this plain reason,' was the answer, ' I am nimmukwaUah, as we say in the East; that is, I have ate of the King's salt, and, therefore, I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness, when and wherever the King or his government may think proper to employ me.
Pagina 195 - Content thyself to be obscurely good. When vice prevails, and impious men bear sway, The post of honour is a private station.

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