Art in Scotland: Its Origin and Progress

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1889 - 483 pagine
 

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Pagina 265 - His touch, too, often approaches the former in spirit and freedom, especially in his earlier pictures. One of them, the Blind Fiddler, is in the gallery. You know this admirable composition from the masterly engraving by Burnet. The effect of the colouring is by no means brilliant, yet the tone of the flesh is warm 'yud clear.
Pagina 265 - ... language and colours, they show us man in his manifold weaknesses, errors, afflictions, and distresses, yet their humour is of such a kind that it never revolts our feelings. Wilkie is especially to be commended, that in such scenes as the Distress for Rent, he never falls into caricature, as has often happened to Hogarth, but with all the energy of expression remains within the bounds of truth. It is affirmed that the deeply impressive and touching character of this picture caused an extraordinary...
Pagina 226 - ... room ; he stood and studied for a minute more, then came up to the canvas, and, without looking at me, wrought upon it with colour for some time. Having done this, he retreated in the same manner, studied my looks at that distance for about another minute, then came hastily up to the canvas, and painted a few minutes more.
Pagina 265 - Rent he never falls into caricature, which often happened to Hogarth, but, with all the energy of expression, remains within the bounds of truth. It is affirmed that the deeply impressive and touching character of this picture caused an extraordinary sensation in England when it first appeared. Here we first learn duly to prize another feature of his pictures, namely, their genuine national character. They are, in all their parts, the most spirited, animated, and faithful representations of the peculiaiities...
Pagina 1 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion.
Pagina 269 - But whilst this young painter was noting the excellence of Wilson, or watching the shifting colours of the sky and the changing hues of nature, he was sensible that a disease which flatters while it destroys was gradually gaining upon him as ice upon the stream, and robbing him of his vigour, bodily and mental. He still continued his excursions among the fields: the consumption from which he was a sufferer made him feel the beauty more deeply of solitary places: he was to be found often in secluded...
Pagina 226 - He spoke a few words to me in his usual brief and kindly way - evidently to put me into an agreeable mood; and then, having placed me in a chair on a platform at the end of his painting-room, in the posture required, set up his easel beside me with the canvas ready to receive the colour. When he saw all was right, he took his palette and his brush, retreated back step by step, with his face towards me, till he was nigh the other end of...
Pagina 106 - The painter's genius, but without the pride ; Worth unambitious, wit afraid to shine, Honour's clear light, and Friendship's warmth divine. The son, fair rising knew too short a date ; But, oh ! how more severe the parent's fate t He saw him torn, untimely, from his side, Felt all a father's anguish, wept and died ! Mallet.
Pagina 265 - His turn of mind is besides very different. If I might compare Hogarth •with Swift, in his biting satire, with which he contemplates mankind only on the dark side, and takes special delight in representing them in a state of the most profound corruption, of the most frightful misery, I find in Wilkie a close affinity with his celebrated countryman, Sir Walter Scott. Both have in common that genuine, refined delineation of character which extends to the minutest particulars. In the soul of both...
Pagina 226 - ... of the mind. I may add, that I found him well informed, with no professional pedantry about him ; indeed, no one could have imagined him a painter till he took up the brush and palette ; he conversed with me upon mechanics and ship-building, and, if I can depend upon my own imperfect judgment, he had studied ship-architecture with great success. On one of the days of my sittings he had to dine with me at the house of a mutual...

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