A Book of Thoughts. [Selections from English, French and German authors.] By H. A. [i.e. Henry Attwell.]

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Macmillan & Company, 1865 - 166 pagine
 

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Pagina 27 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Pagina 63 - ... lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another, ideas wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being mis-led by similitude, and by affinity, to take one thing for another.
Pagina 71 - It is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied; better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied.
Pagina 119 - How can it enter into the thoughts of man, that the soul which is capable of such immense perfections, and of receiving new improvements to all eternity, shall fall away into nothing almost as soon as it is created? Are such abilities made for no purpose? A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass...
Pagina 35 - If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
Pagina 119 - A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass: in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and, were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Pagina 101 - But going over the theory of virtue in one's thoughts, talking well, and drawing fine pictures, of it ; this is so far from necessarily or certainly conducing to form a habit of it, in him who thus employs himself; that it may harden the mind in a contrary course, and render it gradually more insensible, ie form a habit of insensibility, to all moral considerations.
Pagina 10 - A just and reasonable modesty does not only recommend eloquence, but sets off every great talent which a man can- be possessed of. It heightens all the virtues which it accompanies; like the shades in paintings, it raises and rounds every figure, and makes the colours more beautiful, though not so glaring as they would be without it.
Pagina 43 - Truths, of all others the most awful and interesting, are too often considered as so true, that they lose all the power of truth, and lie bed-ridden in the dormitory of the soul, side by side with the most despised and exploded errors.
Pagina 68 - There are many more shining qualities in the mind of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them at work in their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of the person who is possessed of them. Without it learning is pedantry, and wit impertinence ; virtue itself looks like weakness ; the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice.

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