Good in everything; or, The early history of Gilbert Harland

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Grant and Griffith (successors to J. Harris), 1852 - 194 pagine
 

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Pagina 60 - AT the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears, Hangs a thrush that sings loud — it has sung for three years ; Poor Susan has passed by the spot, and has heard In the silence of morning the song of the bird. Tis a note of enchantment ; what ails her ? She sees A mountain ascending, a vision of trees ; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.
Pagina 60 - THE REVERIE OF POOR SUSAN AT the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears, Hangs a Thrush that sings loud, it has sung for three years: Poor Susan has pass'd by the spot, and has heard In the silence of morning the song of the bird. 'Tis a note of enchantment; what ails her? She sees A mountain ascending, a vision of trees; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.
Pagina 141 - Esther's old songs, which she had so often sung to him in the dusk of the evening, and which always made him wish so much to hear the cuckoo. He now hummed it over with great satisfaction, as he looked round on the trees and shrubs ; he only wished he could see this particular cuckoo, and he wondered what it was like. The song began : " Now the sun is in the west, Sinking slow behind the trees ; And the cuckoo, welcome guest, Gently woos the evening breeze : Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo!
Pagina 193 - It does not seem so very hard to be obliged to work," said Gilbert; "Nancy is much happier than she used to be." " Much happier and much better," continued Mrs. Duncan ; " work or labor is a blessing, not a hardship." " But," said Gilbert, " when Adam and Eve were driven from Eden, it was declared that man should eat bread by the sweat of his brow, and this was a punishment.
Pagina 136 - We thus make ourselves the judges of what is best for us, and we take upon ourselves to decide what is evil and what is good. We even presume that the storm, and the wind, and the destroying hail, are proofs of God's displeasure, and that they are punishments ; and that as the fair weather shows his love, so the foul weather makes known his anger. But it has been said by Christ, that God makes his sun to shine upon the just and on the unjust; and in like manner the storm lays waste the fields both...

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