The Monuments and Genii of St.Paul's and Westminster Abbey: Comprising Naval & Military Heroes, Poets, Statesmen [etc.]

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J.Williams, 1826 - 959 pagine
 

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Pagina 21 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Pagina 413 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began ; When Nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, Arise, ye more than dead.
Pagina 387 - A Hymn to God the Father WILT thou forgive that sin where I begun, Which is my sin, though it were done before? Wilt thou forgive that sin through which I run, And do run still, though still I do deplore? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more.
Pagina 246 - I call upon the honour of your lordships, to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country, to vindicate the national character. I invoke the genius of the constitution. From the tapestry that adorns these walls, the immortal ancestor of this noble lord* frowns with indignation at the disgrace of his country.
Pagina 387 - When thou hast done, thou has not done, For I have more. Wilt thou forgive that sin which I have won Others to sin, and made my sin their door? Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score? *° When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more.
Pagina 625 - My Lord, I have been lately informed, by the proprietor of The World, that two papers, in which my Dictionary is recommended to the public, were written by your Lordship.
Pagina 246 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Pagina 286 - And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chilness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice ; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Pagina 263 - In the first place, as he is the father of English poetry, so I hold him in the same degree of veneration as the Grecians held Homer, or the Romans Virgil. He is a perpetual fountain of good sense...
Pagina 21 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us— And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works — he must delight in virtue; And that which he delights in must be happy.

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