Bones and Cartilage: Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology

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Elsevier, 20 giu 2005 - 792 pagine
Bones and Cartilage provides the most in-depth review ever assembled on the topic. It examines the function, development and evolution of bone and cartilage as tissues, organs and skeletal systems. It describes how bone and cartilage is developed in embryos and are maintained in adults, how bone reappears when we break a leg, or even regenerates when a newt grows a new limb, or a lizard a tail.

This book also looks at the molecules and cells that make bones and cartilages and how they differ in various parts of the body and across species. It answers such questions as “Is bone always bone? “Do bones that develop indirectly by replacing other tissues, such as marrow, tendons or ligaments, differ from one another? “Is fish bone the same as human bone? “Can sharks even make bone? and many more.

* Complete coverage of every aspect of bone and cartilage
* Full of interesting and unusual facts
* The only book available that integrates development and evolution of the skeleton
* Treats all levels from molecular to clinical, embryos to evolution
* Written in a lively, accessible style
* Extensively illustrated and referenced
* Integrates analysis of differentiation, growth and patterning
* Covers all the vertebrates as well as invertebrate cartilages
* Identifies the stem cells in embryos and adults that can make skeletal tissues

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Sommario

Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 24 Osteoblast and Osteocyte Diversity
328
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 25 Bone Diversity
338
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part IX Maintaining Cartilage in Good Times and Bad
349
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 26 Maintaining Differentiated Chondrocytes
351
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 27 Maintenance Awry Achondroplasia
358
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 28 Restarting Mammalian Articular Chondrocytes
367
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 29 Repair of Fractures and Regeneration of Growth Plates
375
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part X Growing Together
383

Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part III Unusual Modes of Skeletogenesis
93
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 7 Horns and Ossicones
95
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 8 Antlers
103
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 9 Tendons and Sesamoids
115
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part IV Stem Cells
125
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 10 Embryonic Stem Cells
127
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 11 Stem Cells in Adults
138
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part V Skeletogenic Cells
147
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 12 Osteo and Chondroprogenitor Cells
149
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 13 Dedifferentiation Provides Progenitor Cells for Jaws and Long Bones
166
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 14 Dedifferentiation and Urodele Amphibian Limb Regeneration
183
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 15 Cells to Make and Cells to Break
197
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part VI Embryonic Origins
215
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 16 Skeletal Origins Somitic Mesoderm
217
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 17 Skeletal Origins Neural Crest
230
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 18 EpithelialMesenchymal Interactions
243
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part VII Getting Started
259
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 19 The Membranous Skeleton Condensations
261
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 20 From Condensation to Differentiation
272
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 21 Skulls Eyes and Ears Condensations and Tissue Interactions
284
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part VIII Similarity and Diversity
299
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 22 Chondrocyte Diversity
301
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 23 Cartilage Diversity
316
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 30 Initiating Skeletal Growth
385
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 31 Form Polarity and LongBone Growth
395
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 32 Long Bone Growth A Case of Crying Wolff?
409
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part XI Staying Apart
417
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 33 The Temporomandibular Joint and Synchondroses
419
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 34 Sutures and Craniosynostosis
429
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part XII Limb Buds
441
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 35 The Limb Field and the AER
443
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 36 Adding or Deleting an AER
458
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 37 AERs in Limbed and Limbless Tetrapods
469
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part XIII Limbs and Limb Skeletons
479
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 38 Axes and Polarity
481
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 39 Patterning Limb Skeletons
490
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 40 Before Limbs There Were Fins
498
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part XIV Backbones and Tails
511
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 41 Vertebral Chondrogenesis Spontaneous or Not?
513
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 42 The Search for the Magic Bullet
519
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 43 Tail Buds Tails and Taillessness
529
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Part XV Evolutionary Skeletal Biology
539
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Chapter 44 Evolutionary Experimentation Revisited
541
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology References
559
Developmental and Evolutionary Skeletal Biology Index
737
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Brani popolari

Pagina 158 - You are old,' said the youth, 'and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak Pray how did you manage to do it?
Pagina 95 - In the frequent fits of anger to which the males especially are subject, the efforts of their inner feeling cause the fluids to flow more strongly towards that part of their head; in some there is hence deposited a secretion of horny matter, and in others of bony matter mixed with horny matter, which gives rise to solid protuberances: thus we have the origin of horns and antlers, with which the head of most of these animals is armed.
Pagina 565 - CR, Eaglesom, CC, Hattori, A., and Owen, M. (1980) Formation of bone and cartilage by marrow stromal cells in diffusion chambers in vivo.
Pagina 572 - Growth of embryonic avian and mammalian tibiae on a relatively simple chemically defined medium.
Pagina 570 - Antosz, ME (1986). Mineralized bone nodules formed in vitro from enzymatically released rat calvarial cell populations.
Pagina 571 - ME (1992). Evidence for an inverse relationship between the differentiation of adipocytic and osteogenic cells in rat marrow stromal cell cultures. J Cell Sci.
Pagina 571 - Osteogenic stem cells and the stromal system of bone and marrow. Clin. Orthop.
Pagina 566 - H (1999) Preservation of key biomolecules in the fossil record: current knowledge and future challenges.
Pagina 338 - ... of the child to either parent. From whence it would appear, that the phalli, which were hung round the necks of the Roman ladies, or worn in their hair, might have effect in producing a greater proportion of male children...

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Informazioni sull'autore (2005)

I have been interested in and studying skeletal tissues since my undergraduate days in Australia in the 1960s. Those early studies on the development of secondary cartilage in embryonic birds, first published in 1967, have come full circle with the discovery of secondary cartilage in dinosaurs12. Bird watching really is flying reptile watching. Skeletal tissue development and evolution, the embryonic origins of skeletal tissues (especially those that arise from neural crest cells), and integrating development and evolution in what is now known as evo-devo have been my primary preoccupations over the past 50+ years.

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