Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom

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Pagina 144 - He must divest himself of the prejudices of his age or country; he must consider right and wrong in their abstracted and invariable state; he must disregard present laws and opinions, and rise to general and transcendental truths, which will always be the same...
Pagina 144 - But the knowledge of nature is only half the task of a poet: he must be acquainted likewise with all the modes of life. His character requires that he estimate the happiness and misery of every condition ; observe the power of all the passions in all their combinations, and trace the changes of the human mind, as they are modified by various institutions and accidental influences of climate or custom, from the sprightliness of infancy to the despondence of decrepitude.
Pagina 706 - Fates, — the Past, Present, Future ; watering its roots from the Sacred Well. Its ' boughs,' with their buddings and disleafings, — events, things suffered, things done, catastrophes, — stretch through all lands and times. Is not every leaf of it a biography, every fibre there an act or word ? Its boughs are Histories of Nations. The rustle of it is the noise of Human Existence, onwards from of old.
Pagina 142 - Poetry has been to me its own * exceeding great reward:' it has soothed my afflictions 5 it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments; it has endeared solitude; and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the Good and the Beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.
Pagina 139 - Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.
Pagina 140 - No man was ever yet a great poet without being at the same time a profound philosopher.
Pagina 139 - Poetry turns all things to loveliness ; it exalts the beauty of that which is most beautiful, and it adds beauty to that which is most deformed ; it marries exultation and horror, grief and pleasure, eternity and change ; it subdues to union, under its light yoke, all irreconcilable things.
Pagina 143 - I was desirous to add my name to this illustrious fraternity. I read all the poets of Persia and Arabia, and was able to repeat by memory the volumes that are suspended in the mosque of Mecca. But I soon found that no man was ever great by imitation.
Pagina 143 - All the appearances of nature I was therefore careful to study, and every country which I have surveyed has contributed something to my poetical powers." "In so wide a survey," said the prince, "you must surely have left much unobserved. I have lived, till now, within the circuit of these mountains and yet cannot walk abroad without the sight of something which I had never beheld before or never heeded.
Pagina 97 - ON THE HISTORY, SYSTEM, AND VARIETIES OF TURKISH POETRY. Illustrated by Selections in the Original and in English Paraphrase, with a Notice of the Islamic Doctrine of the Immortality of Woman's Soul in the Future State. By JW Redhouse, Esq., MRAS 8vo, pp.

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