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94. The Two Political Parties: the Supporters of

Aristocratic and of Popular Government, Cic.

95. The Duty of the Conservative Statesman,

Cic.

96. The People avail themselves of the aid of Dema-

gogues only so long as they are engaged in

wringing Concessions from the Ruling

Classes,

Cic.

97. The Violence of Popular Feeling may be dis-

armed by giving it Free Vent through

Legitimate Channels,

Cic.

98. The Morals of the Lower Classes always reflect

those of the Higher,

Cic.

99. Affection the surest Bulwark of Power, : Cic.

100. In Time of War the Consul and the Army have

no Power to pledge the State to any Course

of Action,

Liv.

101. If, therefore, they have given any such Pledge, the

State has a right to repudiate it,

Liv.

102. The Principles of International Right paramount

over all Considerations of Technical For-

mality,

Liv.

103. The Attractions of Power rarely despised, except

by such as lack the Will or the Means to

obtain thein,

Liv.

104. A Public Life calls out the Noblest Qualities of

Man,

Cic.

103. Nevertheless, a Subordinate Position gives Suf!

ficient Opportunities for doing the State

Good Service,

Sen.

106. A Practical Career the most Healthy Life for an

Ordinary Man,

Sen.

107. In choosing our Career we should consult our

Natural Aptitude,

Sen.

108. Even the most Uncongenial Career is rendered

Tolerable by the Force of Custom, .

Sen.

109. The Philosopher who shrinks from entering

Public Life on the Ground of its Corruption,

is placed in a Difficult Position,

Sen.

110. Ought the Philosopher to abjure Wealth:-No:

for he alone knows how to use it,

Sen.

111. What are Justitiable Grounds for going to War? Cic.

112. Influence of a Maritime Position in determining

the Character of States,

Cic.

113. Exile not an Evil,

Sen.

114. What are the True Grounds of Punishment ? Aul. Gell.

115. Comparison of the Tyrant's Life with that of a

Benefactor of Mankind,

C'ic.

116. On the Drawbacks of Specialisation,

Cic.

117. The Hardships of Military Life,

Cic.

118. The Study of Law contrasted with the Profession

of Arms and of Oratory,

Cic.

119. How far is it Justifiable for one acting under

Orders to depart from the Letter of his

Instructions ?

Aul. Gell.

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120. Roman Genius is Imperial,

Virg. 137

121. Class Legislation preceded Equitable Legislation

at Rome,

Tac.

137

122, 123. Cicero's Compendium of Legislation for his

Ideal State,

Cic.

138

124. Sumptuary Laws at Rome,

Aul. Gell. 139

125. The Roman Theory and Practice of Adoption, Aul. Gell. 141

126, 127. Hints on the Examination of Witnesses in

Court,

Quint. 142

128. Any Repudiation of its Engagements by the State

should at all costs be avoided,

Cic.

143

129. Some Questions of Commercial Casuistry, Cic.

143

130. Education. The most Effective Education is by

Example,

Plin., Epp. 144

131. A Gentleman of the Old School complains that

the Old-fashioned Strictness of Educational

Discipline is unduly relaxed,

Plaut.

145

132. Dialogue between a Youth and his Paedagogus, Plaut.

146

133. Education should be based upon a Knowledge of

Greek,

Quint. 146

134. The Memory should be carefully trained and sup-

plied with Knowledge worth remembering, Quint. 147

135. On the Comparative Advantages of School and

Home Training.-(a.) General Statement of

the Question,

Quint. 147

136. (6.) The Objection considered that School Life

is Dangerous to Innocence of Character, Quint. 148

137. (c.) The Objection considered that Sufficient

Individual Attention cannot be given at

School,

Quint. 149

138. (d.) On the Advantage of encouraging à Spirit

of Healthy Emulation among the Young, Quint. 150

139. (e.) Precocity not to be encouraged,

Quint.

151

140. On the Necessity for Mutual Confidence between

Master and Pupil,

Quint. 151

141. Persius describes the Influence of his Tutor,

Cornutus, upon him,

Pers.

152

142. The Young Romans were taught how to discuss

on their Merits Questions involving some of

the Broad Principles of Law,

Quint. 152

143. Truths are best taught to the Young by Instances, Hor. . 153

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148. Atom-Theory of Lucretius:-(a.) The Universe

made up of Atoms and the Void,

Lucr.

149. (6.) Matter Eternal,

Lucr.

150. (c.) Nature of Atoms and their Constituent

Parts,

Lucr.

151. (d.) Motions of the Original Atoms illustrated, Lucr.

152. (e.) Variety in Size and Shape of Atoms, and

the Consequences resulting therefrom, Lucr.

153. (f.) Number of Different Shapes in Original

Atoms limited,

Lucr.

134. (9.) Though Atoms are without Sensation, yet

this may be generated by their Combination, Lucr.

155. (h.) The Existing Universe the Result of a cer-

tain Option of Movement in the Original

Atoms,

Lucr.

156. The Universe formed out of Chaos,

Ovid

137. Amid the Variety of Conflicting Views as to

the Origin of the Universe, one thing is

certain-viz., that it presents the Spectacle

of an Orderly Arrangement,

Vanil.

158. The Universe Spherical in Form,

Vanil.

159. The Sphere is the most Perfect Figure: Effects

of its Spherical Shape on the several Parts

of the Universe,

Cic.

160. The Music of the Spheres,

Cic.

16). Motions of the Sun and Moon : how they affect

the Earth,

Cic.

162. The Difference in the Orbits of the Sun and Moon

explained,

Lucr.

163. Eclipses of the Sun and Moon,

Lucr.

164. An Account of the Moon's Light and Phases, Lucr.

65. Causes of the Motions of the Stars,

Lucr.

166. The Motions of the Five Planets,

Cic.

167. The Motions of the Heavenly Bodies have

suggested the Idea of Time,

Cic.

168. Diameter of the Zodiac estimated in terms of the

Distance between any Two Signs,

Vanil.

169. A Description of the Zodiac,

Vitruv.

170. The Five Zones,

Virg.

171. The Same,

Manil.

172. The Formation of the Earth,

Lucr.

173. The Same,

Virg.

174. The Same,

Ovid

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Cic.

Earth,

177. A Short Description of Asia,

178. A Short Description of Europe,

Mela

Mela

Urla

176

177

178

Page

179. A Short Description of Africa,

Meia

179

180. An Account of the River Nile, with Suggestions

as to the Cause of its Annual Overflow, Mela

179

181. Criticism of the Theory that the Overflow of the

Nile is due to the Etesian Winds,

Sen.

180

182. Account of the Climate and Products of Britain, Tac. 181

183. A Geographical Account of Britain,

Caes.

182

184. A Geographical Account of Gaul,

Caes.

182

185. A Geographical Account of Italy,

Plin., n.h. 183

186. An Estimate of the Area of India, with an

Account of some of its Leading Features, Plin., N.H. 183

187. An Account of Ceylon, taken from the Statement

of Four Cingalese Envoys,

Plin., N.H. 184

188. Relative Measurements of the Quarters of the

Globe,

Plin., N.11. 183

189. The Rotundity of the Earth considered with

reference to the Question of Antipodes, Plin., N.H. 186

190. How far is the Rotundity of the Earth compatible

with the existence of Large Bodies of Water

on its Surface,

Plin., N.H. 187

191. The Epicurean Physics deny the Existence of

Antipodes,

Lucr.

187

192. The Cause of Night and Morning,

Lucr.

188

393. The Causes of the Different Lengths of Days, Lucr.

188

194. There are Two Kinds of Fire: Bodily Heat differs

from Combustible Heat,

Cic.

189

195. On the Disintegrating Power of Heat,

Vitruv.

190

196. A Theory of Lightning,

Sen.

190

197. The Causes of Meteors explained,

Sen.

191

198. Comets arise from the Ubiquity of Fiery Sub-

stance,

Manil. 191

199. Explanation of the Phenomenon of a Solar Halo, Sen. 192

200. The Causes why Vapour and Heat arise from the

Earth,

Vitrur. 193

201. Considerations tending to prove that Air is a

Continuous Fluid Substance,

Sen.

193

202. The Cause and Formation of the Rainbow, Sen.

194

203. The Philosopher Favorinus discusses the Theory

of the Winds,

Aul. Gell.. 196

204. There are eight Main Quarters from which

Winds blow, .

Vitruv. 198

205. The numerous Names of Winds are easily recon

cilable with the Scientific Reduction of their

Number to Eight,

l'itruv. 198

206. An Attempt to account for the Water on the Sur-

face of the Earth as a Secretion analagous to

those of the Human Body,

Sen.

199

207. The Earth destined to be again overwhelmed by

a Flood,

Sen.

199

208. A Theory of the Tides :-(a.) They are due to å

Combination of Solar and Lunar Influence, Plin., N.H. 200

209. (6.) Variations in their Periodicity,

Plin., N.H. 201

210. (c.) The greater the Surface of Water, the more

conspicuous is the Tidal Motion,

Plin., N.H. 201

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