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PREFACE.

My object in drawing up the commentary attached to the following extracts from Tibullus and Ovid, has been to lighten the labour of the classical instructor, and at the same time to render the progress of the pupil more rapid and satisfactory. All the information contained might undoubtedly be communicated orally, but by adhering to this method exclusively, especially in conveying the knowledge of simple facts, I have found by experience that much time is consumed which might be more profitably employed.

Mere references, to even the most common books, are very generally neglected, especially by young readers. In most cases, therefore, where the Latin authors could supply passages bearing directly upon any question which it was desirable to illustrate, these have been quoted at full length, and will themselves form useful exercises for the student. At the same time, the authorities for important statements are given at the bottom of each page, in order that all who have time, opportunity, and inclination may be enabled to examine every point thoroughly and verify every assertion.

A few dissertations have been interspersed here and there among the shorter notes, These are for the most part upon matters which are imperfectly explained in ordinary works, or where the desired results could be arrived at only by searching into and comparing a number of different treatises. Such are the disquisitions on the Lares and Penates (p. 135,) on the Lower World (p. 154,) on the Genius (p. 170,)

PREFACE.

My object in drawing up the commentary attached to the following extracts from Tibullus and Ovid, has been to lighten the labour of the classical instructor, and at the same time to render the progress of the pupil more rapid and satisfactory. All the information contained might undoubtedly be communicated orally, but by adhering to this method exclusively, especially in conveying the knowledge of simple facts, I have found by experience that much time is consumed which might be more profitably employed.

Mere references, to even the most common books, are very generally neglected, especially by young readers. In most cases, therefore, where the Latin authors could supply passages bearing directly upon any question which it was desirable to illustrate, these have been quoted at full length, and will themselves form useful exercises for the student. At the same time, the authorities for important statements are given at the bottom of each page, in order that all who have time, opportunity, and inclination may be enabled to examine every point thoroughly and verify every assertion.

A few dissertations have been interspersed here and there among the shorter notes, These are for the most part upon matters which are imperfectly explained in ordinary works, or where the desired results could be arrived at only by searching into and comparing a number of different treatises. Such are the disquisitions on the Lares and Penates (p. 135,) on the Lower World (p. 154,) on the Genius (p. 170,)

on the Sibylline books and the different Sibyls (p. 187,) on the origin of the Olympian Gods and their wars with the Titans, Giants, &c. (p. 193,) on Saturnus and the Golden Age (p. 199,) on Janus (p. 287,) on Mars (p. 313,) on Faunus (p. 316,) on Vesta (p. 395,) the Preliminary Remarks prefixed to each author and many of the Introductions to the different extracts.

In making a selection of various readings, it appeared proper to include, 1. Those which are equal or nearly equal in authority to the received text. 2. Those which have been adopted by the most esteemed editors. 3. Those which serve to illustrate the manner in which errors gradually crept in during the process of repeated transcription. 4. Those whose rejection involves some point of delicate or curious criticism. I have not felt myself justified in enlarging upon this department, but I am convinced, that in the hands of a skilful examiner various readings may be used as a powerful instrument for exercising the judgment and improving the taste.

In addition to the annotations contained in the best editions of the two poets of which lists have been given in p. 11, and p. 46, I ought to mention that in all that relates to ancient mythology, free use has been made of the works of J. H. Voss,' K. O, Müller, and Hartung, 3 while in the Appendix on the Roman Calendar, the excellent essay of Ideler4 has been closely followed.

W. R.

GLASGOW COLLEGE,

July, 1840.

1 Mythologische Brlefe-Antisymbolik-Kritische Blätter.

2 Prolegomena zu einer wissenchaftlichen Mythologie-Orchomenos-Die Dorier-Die Etrusker.

3 Die Religion der Römer.
4 Handbuch der mathematischen und technischen Chronologie.

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