The Works of Joseph Addison: Including the Whole Contents of Bp. Hurd's Edition, with Letters and Other Pieces Not Found in Any Previous Collection; and Macaulay's Essay on His Life and Works, Volume 4

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G.P. Putnam & Company, 1854
 

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Letters on Masquerades
32
PAGE
35
Account of various Clubs
36
The Uses of the Spectator
41
Custom of telling Stories of Ghosts to Children
45
Conduct of the Lions at the OperaMerit of Nicolini
49
Story of Cleantheon Happiness exemplified in Aurelia Fulvia
53
Various Articles of DressLampoonsScandalPoli tiesLetter from Charles Lillie
57
History of the Italian Opera
61
tioners
65
The SPECTATOR Continued 69 Visit to the Royal ExchangeBenefit of Extensive
69
Illnatured Satire
70
Letter from a ValetudinarianExcess of Anxiety about Health
75
Reflections in WestminsterAbbey
79
Project of an Office for the Regulation of Signsa Mon key recommended for the Opera
83
Italian RecitativeAbsurdities of the Opera Dresses
87
Project of a new Opera
92
Success of the Spectators with various Classes of Read ers represented by the Club
96
False Wit and HumourGenealogy of Humour
100
Catalogue of a Ladys LibraryCharacter of Leonora
104
English TragedyLeeOtway
109
Tragedy and TragiComedy
114
English TragedyMethods to aggrandize the Persons in Tragedy
119
The Spectator Continued
121
Stage Tricks to excite PityDramatic Murders
123
Ill Consequences of the Peace French FashionsChild ish Impertinence
129
46 The Spectators Paper of lints droppedGospelgossip Ogling
137
Remarks on the English by the Indian Kings
142
Effects of Avarice and Luxury on Employments
149
Vision of Marraton
153
Mischiefs of PartyRage in the Female Sex
158
Essay on WitHistory of False Wit
162
The same subject continued 167
172
The Subject continued
177
Difference between True and False WitMixt Wit
181
THE SPECTATOR Continued 184 Account of a remarkable Sleeper
184
Zealvarious kinds of Zealots
185
On Infidelity
186
Allegory of several Schemes of Wit
188
Cruelty of ParentsLetter from a Father to his Son Duty to Parents
189
On Friendship
194
Passion for Fame and PraiseCharacter of the Idols
214
Educationcompared to Sculpture
215
Continuation of the Critique on ChevyChase
218
QualityVanity of Honours and Titles
219
Use of MottoesLove of Latin among the Common peo pleSignature Letters
221
Account of Sappho
223
Female PartySpirit discovered by Patches
225
Letter on the Lovers Leap
227
Fragment of Sappho
229
Dream of a Picture Gallery
230
Reflections on Modesty
231
History of the Lovers Leap
233
Fate of WritingsBallad of the Children in the Wood
235
On the Ways of Providence
237
On Physiognomy
239
Letter on the Absence of LoversRemedies proposed
241
LoversDemurrageFolly of Demurrage
244
Punishment of a voluptuous Man after DeathAdven ture of M Pontigna
249
Books for a Ladys Library
253
Proper Methods of employing Time
257
Subject continuedPursuit of Knowledge
262
Ladies Headdresses
267
The Chief Point of Honour in Men and WomenDuel ling
271
Uncertainty of FameSpecimen of a History of the Reign of Anne I
275
Exercise of the Fan
279
Will Honeycombs Knowledge of the Worldvarious Kinds of Pedants
283
Spectators visit to Sir R de Coverleys Country Seat the Knights domestic Establishment
287
Character of Will Wimble
291
On Ghosts and Apparitions
295
Immateriality of the Soul
300
A Sunday in the CountrySir Rogers Behaviour at Church
304
Labour and Exercise
312
Rural MannersPoliteness
316
Instinct in Animals
324
The Subject continuedSir Rogers Principles
350
Story of Theodosius and Constantia
396
Durability of WritingAnecdote of an atheistical
407
Subject continued Address to those who have jealous
420
On FableFable of Pleasure and Pain
446
On the Beauty and Loveliness of Virtue
504

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Pagina 382 - ... fountains, or resting on beds of flowers: and could hear a confused harmony of singing birds, falling waters, human voices, and musical instruments. — Gladness grew in me upon the discovery of so delightful a scene. I wished for the wings of an eagle, that I might fly away to those happy seats; but the genius told me there was no passage to them, except through the gates of death that I saw opening every moment upon the bridge. —
Pagina 48 - Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise : Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep : All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night.
Pagina 83 - When I read the several dates of the tombs, of some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Pagina 12 - It is said he keeps himself a bachelor by reason he was crossed in love by a perverse beautiful widow of the next county to him.
Pagina 381 - I could discover nothing in it; but the other appeared to me a vast ocean planted with innumerable islands, that were covered with fruits and flowers, and interwoven with a thousand little shining seas that ran among them.
Pagina 379 - The genius smiled upon me with a look of compassion and affability that familiarized him to my imagination, and at once dispelled all the fears and apprehensions with which I approached him. He lifted me from the ground, and taking me by the hand, Mirza, said he, I have heard thee in thy soliloquies ; follow me.
Pagina 381 - I observed some with scimitars in their hands, and others with urinals, who ran to and fro upon the bridge, thrusting several persons on trap-doors which did not seem to lie in their way, and which they might have escaped, had they not been thus forced upon them. "The genius, seeing me indulge myself in this melancholy prospect, told me I had dwelt long enough upon it. ' Take thine eyes off the bridge,' said he, ' and tell me if thou yet seest anything thou dost not comprehend.' Upon looking up,...
Pagina 2 - I HAVE observed that a reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure, till he knows whether the writer of it be a black or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor, with other particulars of the like nature, that conduce very much to the right understanding of an author.
Pagina 220 - The stout Earl of Northumberland, A vow to God did make, His pleasure in the Scottish woods Three summer's days to take; The chiefest harts in Chevy-Chase To kill and bear away.
Pagina 13 - ... his tenants grow rich, his servants look satisfied, all the young women profess love to him, and the young men are glad of his company...

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