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History in the Intermediate

Grades Makes a Book to Meet the New Syllabus Outline

a Necessitý

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THE-SCHOL ARTS.BOOK

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HED BY THE DAVIS VORCESTER MASS

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New Text-Books

RHETORIC AND ENGLISH COMPOSITION

By GEORGE R. CARPENTER, Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition in Columbia · University, New York City. 12mo. Cloth, xviii + 432 pages $1.10 net.

This volume is a careful revision, with many changes, corrections and additions, of Professor Carpenter's well-known “Elements of Rhetoric and English Composition" (first and second high school courses). It now contains, in a single volume, all the material necessary for secondary school training, in accordance with the best tested and soundest principles of theory and practice.

ENGLISH GRAMMAR

By GEORGE R. CARPENTER, Professor of Rhetoric and English, Composition in Columbia University, New York City. 12mo. Cloth, xv+213 pages, 75 cents net.

A complete revision of “Principles of English Grammar." The present volume is less difficult, and is adapted to the needs of first year high school pupils. The exercises are full and carefully graded, and the text itself is clear, definite, and suggestive.

EXPOSITION IN CLASSROOM PRACTICE

By THEODORE C. MITCHILL, Boys' High School, Brooklyn, and GEORGE R. CARPENTER, Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition in Columbia University, New York City. 12mo. Cloth, ix+373 pages, 70 cents net.

This book covers in detail all the forms of exposition actually carried on in Secondary School work. By the use of an abundance of illustrative material and numerous exercises, a thorough understanding of the various phases of explanation is developed. Devices which compel the pupil to help himself are a feature of the work.

ELEMENTARY COMPOSITION

By DOROTHEA F. CANFIELD, formerly Secretary of the Horace Mann Schools, and GEORGE R. CARPENTER, Professor of Rhetoric and English Composition in Columbia University, New York City. 12mo. Cloth, xvi+274 pages, $0.50 net.

An unusually rich collection of material for classes in English Composition. The material is well arranged, well graded, and admirably adapted for use in the seventh and eighth grades. It is accompanied by a clear and suggestive statement of the appropriate rhetorical and grammatical principles.

FIRST BOOK IN LATIN

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The sixty-five lessons comprising this book provide an adequate preparation for the reading of Caesar. Among the important features are the gradual development of the principles of inflection and syntax; the introduction of connected reading, consisting of a simplified form of Caesar; and conversational lessons based on this reading.

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W. E. HICKS, ASST. SUPT. OF SCHOOLS, CLEVELAND, OHIO

ONE of my good teachers frequently said that when he had a number of bad

u boys to whip, he elected to take one at a time. The good parents differ so widely in their notions about the part that they should take in school work that I have usually found it wise to deal with them, one at a time; always being ready to adjust the treatment to the case in hand. Any rule that I made in this matter on Monday was usually broken the following day. Tact is an essential qualification for the teacher who expects to get along with a fair measure of popular success with the patrons of the average school. Not tact alone, but tact with honesty, courtesy, kindness, and forbearance. Parents are generally pretty well set in their views about school work and it is wise to listen to them with great care, but all the while have in mind that you are paid to give instruction to the children; you are holding a certificate that entitles you to be the judge of how best to do it; and true to your position you go quietly and earnestly about the task that educates the children, as you understand it.

Do not make the mistake of thinking that parents are not interested in school work because they do not visit the school. The great army of hardworking and sacrificing parents have reached the opinion--I do not know how or when—that they can play no higher part in the education of the children that they dearly love than that of providing for them and keeping them regularly in the schools. Every other part that the parent may take in school work sinks * into insignificance when compared with this one. The mother who faithfully labors to send her children clean and well-clad every day to the public schools is not in want of any suggestions from you or me about the parent's part in school work. She outranks us all in her service in school work. Such a mother, as a rule, is willing to admit that the teachers know enough generally to teach, manage and discipline a school.

But fortunately there are some parents who do not patronize the school regularly, and those too, who are ready to take an active part in the work of the school in some matters. Perhaps they do not always act wisely, but for the most part they have good motives. They are willing to lend an ear to the complaints of children; discuss what is taught and how it is taught; attend to the grading of pupils; and in some cases are quite willing to give the teachers the advantage of their opinions of school work. And in this republic that cultivates free speech these conditions are as they should be, and teachers should accept the situation without irritation.

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