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2. Id imminutum, “That that (ability) is diminished”-quod refers to this clause: fuerit mihi, “ let it be my fortune.” The subject of fuerit is the following clause, eguisse, &c., -it is in the perf. subjunctive used concessively. $ 45, III., 4: aliquando, “at last,” i. e., after so long a period of prosperity : iel adeo experiri licet, "and this too you may put to the test.” 3. Nunquam tibi redditam gratinm putaveris, “Never think the favor repaid to you”-putaveris is used imperatively. $ 45, III., 4: integra, “ unimpaired :" sciente, “if I know it.” 4. Flagitiosum. $ 98, Obs. 6: cujus curator,

“ whose agent." 5. Id omitto, “This (scil., meos fines tutari) I now cease to do.” By meos fines, he again alludes to his claim to a part of the territory of Jugurtha as his. Ch. CII., ad fin.

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CXI.-1. De communibus rebus multis (verbis), “Respecting the public affairs, at great length,” lit., “with many words." 2. Quod polliceatur, &c. Arrange, Senatum et populum Romanum, quoniam valuissent amplius armis, non habituros ($ 98, Obs. 2.) in gratiam (id) quod polliceatur-non habituros in gratiam, &c., “Would not consider as a favor that which he (Bocchus) promised,” scil., in the preceding chapter: quod illorum, &c., “which might appear to respect their interest more than his own.” § 113, Exc. I. 3. Id adeo in promptu esse, &c., “That this indeed was an easy thing, since he had Jugurtha in his power :" illi, “to him” (Bocchus): adventuram, agreeing with partem, the nearest substantive. $ 98, Obs. 4.

4. Negitare, Refused positively," uncommon but very expressive word, after which supply dicens implied in it: affinitatem ; Jugurtha was his son-in-law, the relationship to which cognationem refers, is not known-intervenisse refers chiefly to fædus, and to affinitatem and cognationem only by Zeugma. $ 150, 1, 2d :

averteret. § 140, Obs. 6: fluxa fide usus, “if he used bad faith :" lenitur, “he is softened down.” 5. Ad simulandam pacem, &c. Arrange and supply, Constituunt (ea) quæ visa (sunt) utilia ad simulandam pacem (scil., cum Jugurtha), &c.

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CXII.-1. Sibi per Dabarem, &c., “That he understood from Sulla by means of Dabar;" conditionibus bellum poni, " that the war could be brought to an end on (certain) conditions,” i. e., without making an unconditional surrender. 2. Cuncta edoctus, “Having received full instructions :" sed Mario parum confidere, “but he could not trust Marius :" conventam," which had been agreed

upon.” The passive of this verb is rare : frustra an adverb as the predicate after fuisse. $ 103, Obs. 1. (3.) 3. Si ambobus consultum, &c., “If he wished the interests of both to be provided for, and a firm peace :"

in potestatem habuisset (for in potestate, &c.), “when he should have such a man in his power.” The accusative thus used after in with habere, however, expresses the twofold idea of getting and keeping; thus, in custodiam habitus, “put into prison and kept there :” so here, “get into his power and keep in it." See other examples, Andrews' Lexicon, habeo, C. 4. Neque hominem, &c. Neque

Arrange and supply thus, Et hominem nobilem (qui esset) in potestate hostium, non sua ignavia, sed ob rem publicam, non (from neque) relictum iri (ibi): scil., in potestate hostium.

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CXIII.-1. Secum ipse, “ With himself.” $ 98, Exc. 5: dolo (i. e., num dolo, $ 140, 5, Note) an vere cunctatus (sit), " whether he delayed treacherously or sincerely:" ipse sibi (- ipsis sibi) adversce, “contradictory,” lit., “opposed to themselves,” i. e., to each other. 2. Benigne habere, “He treated them kindly:" secum ipse, as above: vultu corporis, “in the expression of the bodily features.” Vultus (from volo “I wish ") means properly “the expression,” scil., of in ward emotion, and hence “ the countenance," by which emotions are usually expressed. 3. Quo scilicet, tacente, &c., “Which things (scil., those described in the first part of the sentence), as could be seen, though he himself was silent, revealed the secrets of his breast :” patefecisse here depends on scilicet = scire licet. 4. Ex ejus sententia, “In concert with him,” lit., “according to his opinion." 5. Insidiantibus, “ By those lying in wait;" uti dictum erat, as had been appointed :”. ex insidiis, “ (by those) from the ambuscade.” The capture of Jugurtha took place B. c. 106, when Marius was no longer consul, but remained in Africa as proconsul during that and the following year, for the purpose of arranging and settling the affairs of that province, which had fallen greatly into disorder. Bocchus received a part of western Numidia as far as the river Ampsaga, and Numidia was divided between Hiempsal and Hiarbas, two princes of the family of Masinissa. Sulla considered the taking of Jugurtha to be an event so important to the state, and so glorious to himself, that he had it engraved as a device on his sealing ring, and thereby occasioned great offence to Marius.

CXIV.-1. Per idem tempus, “ About the same time,” i. e., the year after;

Adversum Gallos, more properly Germanos. The

reference is to the Cimbri and Teutones, here called Gauls, probably because before this they had been wandering about in Gaul in quest of settlements: quo metu,“ by the fear of which.” 2. Illique, &c., “Both those Romans (i. e., the Romans of that day) and from that, down to our own time:". sic habuere, &c., “ held this opinion, that all other things were easy (practicable) to their bravery.” 3. Consul absens factus (est), “Was made consul in his absence.” This was a violation of the law, as no person was allowed to be a candidate unless present at the time; and if he had been consul before, a period of ten years must intervene. In both respects the law was dispensed with in favor of Marius, now elected consul a second time, which showed the high estimation in which he was then held. 4. Isque Kalendis Januariis, &c., “ And he as consul triumphed with great glory on the Kalends of January,” i. e., on the first of January, the day on which the consul elect entered on his office. 5. Ea tempestate, “At that time.” These words are emphatic and in contrast with the time that followed, when the ambitious course of Marius caused so much misery to the state, and led to a great change of sentiment respecting him.

The death of Jugurtha corresponded to his wicked and wretched life. Being brought to Rome, he was exposed to the view and to the insults of the Roman people, and dragged in chains to adorn the triumph of Marius. He was afterwards thrust into a loathsome dungeon, where, after lingering in extreme wretchedness for six days, he died of hunger.

TABLE OF REFERENCES

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ANDREWS AND STODDARD'S LATIN GRAMMAR.

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In the following Table of References to Andrews & Stoddard's Latin Grammar, each corresponds to the reference to Bullions' Latin Grammar, in the Chapter and note indicated by the numbers prefixed. CATILINE.

VI, 3. & 209 Rem. 11

(4). I, 1. $ 85, Exc. 1.

4. 323, 1 (2) 2. $ 211, Rem. 2.

5. 209, Rem. 5. 53.

212, Rem. 2, 4. 265, Rem. 2.

Note 4. 5. 243.

227. II, 1. 207, Rem. 32.

7. 223, Rem. 2. 204, Rem. 10.

8. 275, Rem. 1 (5). 4. 207, Rem. 32.

259 Rem. 1(2). 209, Rem. 7.

119, iii. III, 1. 269.

VII, 1. 204, Rem. 11 210, Rem. 1, &

(4). 205, Rem. 7 (2).

256, Rem. 3. 223.

3. 257, Rem. 6. 205, Rem. 6.

209, Rem. 11. 6. 213, Rem. 1.

205, Rem. 8. IV, 1. 211, Rem. 5.

206, Rem. 19 3. 206, Rem. 19

(9). (3).

265. V, 2. $ 211, Rem. 6.

VIII, 1. 256, Rem. 16. 3. § 213, Rem. 1.

5. 207, Rem. 35. 4. 226.

. 207, Rem, 28. 212, Rem. 4.

5.

256, Rem. 9. 7. 205, Rem. 2 (3).

7

257, Rem. 4. 205, Rem. 2 (3)

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225, iji. VI 3. 118, 2.

227. 207 Rem. 32.

205, Rem. 2 (8).

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209, Rem. 5.

259, Rem. 1 (2) XI, 1.

235, Rem. 5. 2. 207, Rem. 23. 3.

145, 1. 4. 257, Rem. 7. 5. 209, Rem. 5. 8. 212, Rem. 3.

Note 1.
XII, 1. § 227, Rem. 2.
2. $ 209, Rem. 12

(6).
3. § 252.
4 § 277, Rem. 5.
5. § 226.

6. $ 229, Rom. 1. XIII, 4. $ 209, Rem. 5. XVII, 4. $ 270, Rem. 1.

5. & 264, 6. XVIII, 2. Š 206, Rem. 19.

(6). XIX, 4.

264, 6. XX, 2.

225, ii. 4. 206, Rem. 19

(9).
8. § 53.

240.
9. 205, Rem. 17.

119, iii.
13. 204.

260, Rem. 6. XXI, 5. 217.

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XXII, 1. 264, 6.

2. 209, Rem. 5.

3. 211, Rem. 2. XXIII, 2. 139, Rem. 1.

4. 211, Rem. 5.
5.

209, Rem. 4. XXIV, 2. 139.

237. 3.

198, 1. XXV, 2.

234, i. 3. 209, Rem. 7. 4. 205, Rem. 15. 5. 209, Rem. 12

(3). XXVI, 6. $ 205, Rem. 15. XXVII, 1. § 207, Rem. 32.

3.

141, i. 3.

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207, Rem. 32.
264, 5.
265.
274, Rem. 4.
206, Rem. 19

(13).
262, Rem. 4.
89, 2.
275, ii.
266, 2.
207, Rem. 26.
205, Rem. 15.
266, Rem. 5.
211. Rem. 5.
276, iii,
262, Rem. 4.
206, Rem. 19

(6). § 213, Rem. ]

(3). 139. 262, Rem. 4. 258. 266, Rem. 5. 229, Rem. 1. 207, Rem. 23. 276, ii. 205, Rem. 15. 207, Rem. 32. 278, Rem. 9. 278, Rem. 9. 207, Rem. 28. 257, Rem. 7. 207, Rem. 29. 204, Rem. 11.

(4.) 257, Rem. 7. 260, Rem. 2. 145, ii. 265. 145, i, 3. 207, Rem. 26. 215. 213, Rem. 1 (3) 226. 237, Rem. 4. 233 & § 242.

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273, i.

209, Rem. 12 (6).

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