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Fig. 2.-DETAIL of EMBRomERY FoR TURRISH SCARF, Fig. 1.

tion here, which is that the
friends and acquaintances of
the country home-keeping wo-
man should wait for her to an-
nounce her pleasure in receiv-
ing them before volunteering
their society. When the dwell-
er by woods or sea, not per-
functorily, but of her own will
and wish, asks her friend to
come to her, and asks with
urgency, then it is to be taken
for granted that she means it,
that the friend's coming is of
more value than any external
things; and in that case the
friend should not fail her, but
should feel that her mere pre-
sence is health and rest to the
one that asks for it without
hint or leading.
Many a country dweller has
a home to which she would de-
light in asking friends—for its
strong mountain air, for the
fresh vigor of its sea smells,
for the breath of its kine. But
the circumstances that bar

FRock For GIRL FROM 3 to 5 YEARs old.—FRoNT AND BACK. FULL SIZE. FRock For CHILD FROM 2 to 4 YEARs old.—BACK AND FRONT. For pattern and description see Supplement, No. X., Figs. 38–45. For pattern and description see Supplement, No. III., Figs. 17–20. THE UNINVITED - - 2 o' =r

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HE woman who has kept house in the country through the asperities of the ruder seasons finds it strange that the only part of the year in which she could sit down and look Time in the face furnishes her acquaintance the opportunity of feeling that they cannot live any longer without seeing her, or pass by without stopping—of making her useful, in short, as the vehicle of their summer outing. The weather may be the sultriest; the market may be meagre; the house - keeper may have poor help; she may desire to save her funds for other purposes. It is of no consequence: the city friend wants a season in the country, and takes it. This unsought guest brings with

EMBROIDERED MONOGRAM.

- - - EMbroidEREd Monogram. her extra washing and ironing

of table and bed linen, if no
other, extra care about the
house appointments, the neces-
sity of table dainties which
would have been dispensed with
under other circumstances—for
of course we are not speaking
of those millionaire-hostesses
who need not be aware of a
guest, so easy is the path of
their hospitality; she brings,
too, heat and worry and ex-
pense, and not by any means
always a welcome. The coun-
try dame feels she has been
made a convenience, that her
house is only a summer hotel,
and that the whole thing is at
the cost of the pleasure-taking
which the rest of the year
might have afforded.
There is one evident deduc-

them out are sufficient to her, whether the slender purse, or the grumbling provider, or the person of the family whose shortcomings must be kept in darkness, or division in the household to be hidden, or want of strength, or fear of making the burden heavy on others, or anything else imperative; and her friends love her better when they leave her alone, and do far more for her happiness than when they take pains to see her unsolicited and unrequired. Every one has a right to the seclusion of home, and that seclusion is something which should not be broken in the first instance save by the mistress of the house.

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CRoCHET FRock For CHILD FROM

- - 1 to 2 YEARs old. F. o overal. Arnon. For description see Supplement. Fig. 1–TuRKish ScARF.—[See Fig. 2.] "o. §. o o; up

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USEFUL RECIPES.

Macartoons.—Blanch one pound of sweet almonds and a few peach kernels or bitter almonds. Beat these together in a marble mortar until quitefine with a little rose-water. Put to the almonds a pound of double refined sugar, after it has been made fine and Fifted. Then beat as light as possible the whites of eight eggs; put all together, and beat well. Now drop the mixture on wetted sheets of paper, sift pulverized sugar over the little cakes, and bake them in a cool oven on flat sheets of tin. To clean stoves.-Put two table-spoonfuls of British lustre to a gill of weak alum-water. Let the stove be cold, brush with the mixture, and let it stand for a very few minutes, then take a dry brush dipped in dry lustre, and rub until perfectly bright. Should any part, before being polished, become gray, moisten it with a wet brush, and proceed in the same way us before.

A (; so EAT' ENGLISH REMEDY. For BILIOUS AND LIVER TROUBLES.

A famous physician, many years ago, formulated a preparation which effected remarkable cures of liver diseases, bile, indigestion, etc., and from a small beginning there arose a large demand and sale for it, which has ever increased until, after generations have passed, its popularity has become world-wide. The name of this celebrated remedy is CockLE's ANti-Billious PiLLs. To such travelled Americans as have become acquainted with the great merits of these Pills (so unlike any others), and who have ever since resorted to their use in cases of need, commendation is unnecessary. But to those who have not used them and have no knowledge of their wonderful virtues, we now invite attention. The use of these Pills in the United States is already large. Their virtues have never varied, and will stand the test of any climate. They are advertised–not in a flagrant manner, but modestly; for the great praise bestowed upon them by high authorities renders it unnecessary, even distasteful, to extol their merits beyond plain, unvarnished statements. Persons afflicted with indigestion or any hilious or liver trouble should bear in mind “Cockle's ANti-Billious Pills,” and should ask for them of their druggist, and if he has not got them, insist that he should order them, especially for themselves, of any wholesale dealer, of whom they can be had. JAMEs CockLE & Co., 4 Great Ormond Street, London, W. C., are the proprietors.-[Adv.]

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DAZZLING COMPLEXION

LIKE UNTO THE ExqLISITE SOFTNESS AND WELVETY BLOOM OF FRUIT.

THE opoRous of NTMENTs of Æschixos, AMBROSLA And sacked oils.

“What complexios is she of "
Comedy of Errors.

Disearlt, telling the story of Ixion in heaven, pictures the god of love in his encounter with the King of Thessaly as very fair, with cheeks tinged with a rich but delicate glow like the rose of twilight, and lighted by dimples that twinkled like stars. What better description could be given of the skin of a beautiful woman, and “the purple pride which on her soft cheek for complexion dwells”? how to maintain this roseate blush of the cheek, this spotless ivory of the brow, should be the study of every woman. For it is not only to be maintained, it may positively be created by proper treatment of the skin–treatment worthy of the finest, most subtle and elastic organ of the system, an organ which resents artificial applications, but yields all its charin to the clarifying power of water and choice soap. No strict perfection of classic feature compensates for the want of brilliant color in the face, and the noblest statue of antiquity would not long attract the gaze from the pearly glow of a Madame Recamier's skin, or from the clear red and white of that of the empresses of France, the creole Josephine's, the Scotch and Spanish blending of Eugénie's Long ago, aware of this, the Athenians colored their statues; for the Greek, the pure lover of beauty, everywhere valued color, and the Greek woman, that type of beauty in all art, resorted to every secret of the bath to enrich the color of her skin, and employed immense quantities of those odorous ointments of which Æschines, the great orator and statesman, was a manufacturer, and which in her use took the place of our Cuticura Medicated Toilet Soap, a soap where the fine forces of the old unguents are mingled with odors drawn from the inmost nectaries of flowers. Venus, rising from the foam of the sea, was once all that the highest ideal of the painter could reach; but it is doubtful if the seafoam were more than figurative of the beautifying effect of the bath, where the creamy lather of the soap, cleaving to the oily impurities ready to be cast off, leaves the body fair and smooth as a healthy child's. The warm tint which is said to be the undying beauty of the high-born English dame is obtained by the use of nothing but soft water with this delicately medicated toilet soap. For although the “sweet coffer" was a necessity of the dressing-table of her ancestress, so that the wits exclaimed,

“Bring, O bring the essence-pot, Amber, musk, and bergamot, Eau de chipre, eau de luce, Sanspareil and citron juice,”

yet to-day the chemist has taught that by dispensing with those ruinous washes and cosmetics, and by employing a soap whose innocent fragrance is enchanting, and through whose agency all the vesicles of the skin are allowed free play in their work of producing that fresh loveliness which at once delights the eye and seems typical of an inner purity, there can be had a skin exquisite in its pink-and-white beauty as the hues of Dresden china—that china, by singular paradox, into the flames of whose furnace, according to the old superstition, the lovely pearl and rose of a child's, or a young girl's, flesh must be cast ere the tints could come out pure and perfect. When Homer represents the Queen of Heaven preparing for conquest, she does not make herself gay with painting, but upon her lovely body she casts ambrosia and a rich and sacred oil; that is to say, she bathes and uses the substitute of the poet's time for perfumed soap, which was a compound of rich oils, ambrosial perfumes, and medicating substances, almost identical with Cuticura Soap, and capable of cleansing the pores and setting the blood in that quick and healthy motion which produces color, sparkle, and the exquisite softness of surface comparable only to the velvely bloom of fruit. Ninon de l'Enclos, who retained her pristine charm at ninety, never, it is said, used anything but soap and water to preserve it; nor did Diane de Poictiers, who held a king half her age in thrall; and most of the women who have dazzled thrones have done their dazzling by means of a skin kept brilliant with pure soap and water alone—a skin where the full free life not only reddened the oval of the cheek, but fed the gentle fire behind the eye, and burned in scarlet on the lip; for whoever has a clear rosy complexion has unfailingly a bright eye and a red lip, too.

It becomes, then, of the first importance, in view of the power of so simple and easy an appliance as soap and water, to make sure that the soap used is the best for its purpose that science has been able to procure, and one that will even lend its aid towards softening the water, if that be not all that is desired, a properly medicated soap, not only agreeable to the senses of touch and smell, but having also the detergent quality which invigorates the skin, urging the outlet of every gland to activity, and calling upon each vessel to bring its best and freshest blood to the surface. From the use of such a soap nothing can result but that swift circulation of pure blood which makes a rich stain of color *" cheek and chin, and leaves everywhere else a milky purity. This peerless complexion is to be secured in no other way; and a medicated soap, into which no unwholesome ingredient enters, is nowhere to be had in such perfection as that offered by the Cuticura Medicated Toilet Soap, in which the healing power of Cuticura itself combines with the emollient and lubricating action of a perfect soap, so invigorating the glands of the skin that they cast out through the pores and ducts all the refuse which if retained produces disease, and which if removed assures the beauty of health and purity. No corrosive or caustic substance, no metallic, mineral, or vegetable poison, is contained in the Cuticura Soap; but chemical science has wrought its wonder here by thoroughly innocent methods. Blotches or pimples, eruptions, scurf, or rashes are hardly possible where the Cuticura Soap is in daily use; no tan, sunburn, or discoloration can long withstand it; it eradicates gently and permanently nearly every complexional defect, removes the source of many disfiguring humors, leaves the skin without blemish, and purifies and beautifies the whole exterior. Every woman who employs it may do so with advantage, finding in its use a worthy rival of that bloom of youth which, in the old myth, Medea gave her patients by plunging them in her boiling caldron with strange herbs and incantations, a myth doubtless to be interpreted as a series of baths where the witch used the best cleansing and purifying agents of her time.

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IBAJEBY'S SKIN & SCALP CLEAN SED PURIF | ED AND BEAUTIFIED BY

CuTicur A.

OR CLEANSING, PURIFYING, AND BEAUtifying the skin of children and infants and curing torturing, disfiguring, itching, scaly and pimply diseases of the skin, scalp, and blood, with loss of hair, from infancy to old age, the Cutioura REMEDIEs are infallible. Cutiour:A, the great Skin CURE, and CUTroup A Soap, an exquisite Skin Beautifier, prepared from it, externally, and CUTLou RA REsolvi. NT, the new Blood Purifier, internally, invariably succeed when all other remedies and the best physicians fail. CUTIQURA REMEDIEs are absolutely pure, and the only infallible skin beautifiers and blood purifiers, free from poisonous ingredients. Sold everywhere. Price, CUtiour.A, 50c.; Soap, 25c.; Resolv ENT, $1. Prepared by the Potter: DRUG ANI, CHEMICAL Co., Bostos, Mass. Coo" Send for “How to Cure Skin Diseases.”

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SEE the SPLENDII» SUCCESS of AGENTS :

One made a Profit First 3 Weeks of $138 l; One First 6 Days $94.501; One First 10 Days $145 !! ; One First 3 Days $26.50 ! One First 3 Weeks $103.50.1 !; Making a Clean Profit in 7 Weeks Work of $500 :::.

It takes off Saratoga follies, flirtations, low necks, dudes, pug dogs, etc., in the author's inimitable mirth§o. The (100) pictures by “Opper” are “just filling.” People crazy to get it. Agents are making $50 to $75 a week. Price $2.50. AGENTS WANTED. Apply to HUBBARD BROS. (F) Philada. or Kansas City.

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Corticelli Silk Purse.

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BARRETT, NEPHEWS, & CO., 5 AND 7 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. DYE, CLEAN, and REFINISH DRESS GOODS and

Garments without ripping. Send for Circular and Price-list.

STATEN

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E P P S 'S

CRATEFUL–COMFORTING,

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MADE WITH BOILING MILK.

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Five Reasons for Wearing the Health Underwear.

1st. Camel's Hair and Wool are twice as Warm as the same weight of Cotton or Linen.

2d. They protect the body against excessive heat and against drafts and sudden changes of temperature.

3d. They are an important protection against colds, catarrh, consumption, neuralgia, rheumatism and malaria.

4th. They cannot crock, fade or poison the skin, as they are matural colors and contain no dyes.

5th. The Camel's Hair is Warranted to wash without shrinking.

Manufactured in all styles of Gentlemen’s, Ladies' and Children's Underwear and Night Shirts.

FOR SALE BY 1,EADING MERCHANTS. Catalogue with Prices sent on application. WARNER BROS., 359 Broadway, N.Y.

Patented Improved Lotta Bustle.

For Style, Comfort, Health, and Durability has no equal. Gives the latest Parisian fashion. Warranted to always regain its shape after pressure, no matter in what position the wearer may sit or recline. Avoid inferior imitations. See that each Bustleisstamped Improv’d “Lotta.” Send for price-list. Columbia Rubber Co., Sole M'fors, Boston, Mass.

For sale by all the leading dry-goods houses.

common-sense

HINTS ON HEALTH

And exercise for both sexes. Price 10c. For sale by all newsdealers or sent by mail on receipt of price. JOHN B. LOVELL ARMS CO., 147 Washington St.

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*ABELs IMITATIONS Everywhere.

LADES, MMFJULIAN's SPECIFIC

Is absolutely the only unfailing remedy for removing radically and permanently all Superfluous Hair from Lips, Cheeks, Chin, Arms, &c., without injuring the skin, which neither torturous electricity nor any of the advertised poisonous stuffs can accomplish. Address Mme. JULIAN, 48 East 20th St., New York.

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|DR. HUMPHREYS' Book,144 Pages,
Cloth, with Steel Engraving,
Mailed Free, Address, HUMPHREYS."
Home6PAThic specifics,
109 Fulton Street, N. Y.

|||| ||||(LE The only known preparation guaror- 1 teed to prevent and remove Wrinkles

of the face and neck. Absolutely harmless. Sent by mail, with full directions, on receipt of price, 50cts. Agents Wanted. Hoglies & Co., Box 432, Little Rock, Ark.

- o - Zo o -7; Positively * - S but skin deep. There are thousands of ladies who have tegular features and would be accorded the palm of beauty were if not for a poroploign. To all such ope recommend DR. HEBRA'S VIOLA CREAM as possessing those qualities that quickly change the most sallow and Jlorid *|† to one of natural health and unblemished beauty. It corres oily skin, freckles, face grubs, black heads, blotches, sunburn, tan, pimples and all imperfections of th? skin. The wrinkies of old age disappear by its use It is not a cosmetic but a cure, yet is better for the foilet tal a than powder. Sold by Druggists, or sent postpaid too.”

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FARMr R. “Why don't you jump into that river and take a bath " Titamie (badly tasselated). “Because if I once got these clothes off, I'd never know how to get them on again.” FARMER. “Then jump in clothes and all. It will be an all around benefit.” TraMr. “I would, only then I'd be identified.” FARMr.R. “Who are you, anyhow 7" Titaxip. “I’m an ex-Vice-President.” NOT A BAD OUTLOOK. “You must understand, Mr. Dumley, in seeking the hand of my daughter,” said the old man, “that she will bring you no dowry until after my death.” “I understand, sir,” responded Dumley, hopefully; “but you must bear in mind, my dear sir, !. you are getting well on in years.”

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CALLs in Neighbor Hodge ANd his Two stalWART sons. To Assist lilm.

AN UNJUST SUSPICION.

WIFE (who has been very silent all through breakfast). “John Smith, you talked in your sleep last night about a Miss Ford. I distinctly heard you say that she was a daisy. And you the father of a family. Mother shall hear of this.”

John (who had been to the races). “Miss Ford, my dear, is a horse.”

WiFE. “John, love, let me send you some hot cof

fee.” Out of the frying-pan—The average steak.

THE CORRECT PRONUNCLATION. Mrs. BINGHAM. “I spose, Miss Amelia, you saw some gran’ specimens of arkatecter when you's down in New York city ?” Miss AMELIA (who has been studying French without a master). “Oh yes, indeed, Mrs. Bingham; 'specially some of them French flahs 1” (flats.)

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They EMploy Mechanical AGENCIES, AND PULL up sevee AL Yards of FLOOR.

GRAND FINALE.

On employing a servant lady it is a mistake to ask Of all the trials of life the sweetest trial is the trial of her where she worked last; she should be asked when the sewing-machine that is left on trial for six weeks she worked last. with the woman who wouldn't buy it on any terms.

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overtaxing even the stoutest shelves.

that with the strongest supports must be piled the plates. If there must be double rows of china in order to economize space, the highest pieces should be placed at the back of the shelf rather than in front, where they would be knocked dowii by any one reaching over them. A little judgment in arrangement will easily dispose matters so that those things needed most frequently will be most readily obtained. Wuere the best china is kept in a dresser in the dining-room it may be converted into a very ornamental object by the use of hooks for cups, pitchers, etc. The linen closet, while less showy, is equally precious. Here too skill in assortment is needed. The cotton and linen sheets must be in separate piles, as must be cotton and linen pillow-cases and bolster slips. Those of different sizes must also be divided. Great confusion is saved by this simple method. No one who has unfolded one sheet and pillow-case after another, vainly seeking those devoted to some particular bed, will fail to enforce the necessity of keeping unlike pieces in separate piles. In many families it is the custom to go through the entire stock of linen in rotation, that all may be worn alike. The disadvantage of this system is that the whole collection generally needs replenishment at once. A better way is to divide the store, or at least to reserve a portion of it with which to supply deficiencies when that in constant circulation threatens to fail. One is then always sure of having changes of irreproachable napery in case of emergency. This is especially necessary with towels, as these are apt to become unaccountably stained or torn. There should never be lacking a number of nice towels for the guest-chamber. It is an excellent idea to have ã distinct set of towels for each member of the family, children included. They may be distinguished by different patterns, or by an embroidered or stamped letter. The elders not only prefer a better quality of linen than that appreciated by the little ones, but also take more care of the finer towels. Those hung in the children's rooms are not unlikely to do service in rubbing mud from the shoes or wiping fruit stains from the fingers. In every linen closet there should be a corner for old cloths, worn-out garments, discarded under-wear, and hopelessly frayed linen. These should be torn into pieces of available size and put up in neat rolls. The preserve closet should be dark and cool. Canned fruits, jellies, and jams are prone to darken by exposure to the light, and ferment and sour if kept in too warm a place. The taller glass jars should be placed at the back of the shelves, with the labels on them high enough up to be seen over the jelly glasses ranged in front. The large stone crocks are safest dn the floor: it is hardly worth while to tempt Providence by Every jar, tumbler, and cup should be so legibly marked that the nature of its contents may be determined by a single flash of a match. Pickles should have their own corner, distinct from that allotted to sweet conserves. The shelves should be examined once a fortnight for any sign of the sticky dripping that indicates fermentation of the jams or preserves. Such vigilance will render it possible to check the mischief before it has gone so far as to be irremediable. Unless very thoroughly convinced of the honesty of her domestics, the mistress will do well to have a lock on this door, and to retain the key in her own possession; the taste for sweets is strong in all classes, and it is both wise and kind to keep temptation out of the Way. Clothes closets are not often as neat as those hitherto mentioned. It is hard to keep any place that is in such constant and hasty use as are these in apple-pie order. Still, they may be in a state very far removed from the utter confusion into which they often degenerate. When possible, one side of each closet should be fitted with large drawers, in which may be laid delicate dresses, extra under-clothing that has no place in the bureau, furs in winter, and thin gowns in summer, nor should shelves be lacking for hat-boxes, etc. The indispensable shoe-bag has already been mentioned. There should be hooks in abundance, and double ones at that. By using these, the skirts may be hung on the lower pegs and the waists on the upper ones, thus preventing the latter from becoming crushed and tumbled. Closets filled with dresses that are in regular service are apt to grow close and musty. To avoid this, gowns should never be put away immediately upon taking them off; they should receive a good shaking, and be spread out to air for a while. This is especially necessary in warm weather. Even this is not sufficient to keep the closet sweet and clean without giving it an occasional airing. To accomplish this, all the dresses should be taken down and shaken in another room, while that in which the closet is should be left with the window and closet door wide open for a couple of hours. Handsome dresses that are infrequently worn should be protected from dust even in the closet by a sheet or curtain hung over them. Soiled clothes should never be kept in a bedroom closet. They render it unsavory, with an odor that clings when the offending cause has been removed. The hamper for these should stand in the bath-room, or in a corner where there is a free circulation of air. They should never be put where they are liable to fall a prey to mice or cockroaches. These will scent food that has been spilled upon garments, or even the starch in them, and make a feast of it, devouring the fabric as well. In every house there must be a lumber closet. To avoid rendering this a receptacle for a heap of miscellaneous rubbish, it is advisable to make a number of bags to hold the odds and ends relegated to this cubby. There must be a bag for white rags and another for colored, one for newspapers, another for pieces of dress goods, another

for wrapping-paper and twine. By means of these catch-alls the closet that is usually the bugbear of the house-keeper may be kept in as trim order as any other in her domain.

NEW YORK FASHIONS.
AUTUMN WEDDINGS.
THE BRIDE's DRESS.

IV. white satin, faille française, and moiré antique are the fabrics of rich wedding gowns prepared for autumn, and their trimming is lace in flounces of round point, or in wide breadths of Valenciennes, or of embroidered lisse broad enough to drape the entire front of the skirt. White satin with round point flounces and garniture of lilies-of-the-walley with orange blossoms. is the typical gown for a bride whose maids will wear rose-pink tulle, making the tableau at the altar white and rose instead of the white and gold groups seen last year. Faille française with thick reps, yet very soft and as lustrous as satin, is chosen by brides of conservative taste, and is draped with Valenciennes or Brussels lace. Moiré with frost-like surface takes the place of brocades for very handsome dresses, and may be used with its surface merely marked by large ripples, or else with stripes and balls of satin,

THE TRAIN AND BASQUE.

The skirt of the bridal dress has a full flowing train of four or five breadths entirely without trimming, and so well lined and mounted over crinoline, steels, balayeuse, etc., that a trained petticoat is not needed beneath it. The front breadths are newly arranged in deep shirring at the top, falling straight to the foot, where a flounce of lace is set on as a border without fulness; or else lace flounees may be gathered across the foot of a gored skirt, and above these will be a breadth tif the satin of silk (with selvages showing) for drapery at the top. Widelisse or lace fronts fall straight, and are lifted on Grie side or on both by

a bouquet of orange blossoms or by a cluster of

bows of moiré ribbon set close together in a row. The pointed front of the basque is draped with lace, two lengths of a flounce being set on at the top with the scalloped edges meeting; this lace may be gathered into the shoulders, leaving a V-shaped opening on the neck, or it may be gathered high at the throat, the scallops meeting at the top, carried down full over the bust, and tucked into a half-girdle below, or else it may meet revers turned over on bias fronts of the dress goods which begin in the under-arm seams just below the armholes and are laced together in the middle, or may be tapered to a point, and have lapping ends held by a jewelled clasp, a cluster of Bows; or à bouquet. The lace sleeves are full, and are in two slight puffs from the top to the elbows. The only flowers are those of the cor. sage and a single cluster on the skift. The traditional wreath of orange blossoms is revived at English weddings, and the tulle veil is arranged to fall merely at the back, without draping the sides or veiling the face, The gloves of white undressed kid are long enough to meet the sleeves, and are worn more smoothly on the arms than they were formerly.

SIMPLER GOWNS.

Simpler gowns are of gros grains, watered silk, or the inexpensive pearl white India or China silks that cost $1 a yard or even less. These are made up without lace, but have a trimming of pearl or crystal galloon in straight rows of beads with looped edges, arranged as a high collar, meeting down the front as a vest between shirred pieces from the shoulders, and edging the entire pointed waist; there are also beaded passementeries with large points, palms, and fringed pieces that can be separated and used for the waist and skirt. An effort to do away with the conventional wedding dress is seen in the white cloth dresses furnished by London tailors, and in the tulle dress made for a young Southern bride. A bride just leaving off mourning has a dress of white China crape, with all her

_other gowns of gray or heliotrope shades. A gray

cloth costume trimmed with silver braid, and a bonnet to match, are being made for a widow to wear on the occasion of her second marriage. A set of pearl passementerie for a bride's dress has a V-shaped plastron, epaulettes with fringe, a collar and cuffs, and a rope-like girdle with tasselled ends. BRIDEMAIDs' DRESSEs.

Moiré with brocaded stripes of flowers is made up with lace for bridemaids' dresses. This may have white ground, or it may be of the palest old-rose, sky blue, Nile green, or yellow, and when there are a number of bridemaids each pair wears a different color. These dresses are made with a short bouffant skirt, lace flounces, and a long pointed waist, with Pompadour square neck and elbow sleeves; a small hat of lace, and a basket of flowers carried in the hand, complete these Dresden-china toilettes. White moiré basques with lace skirts and moiré sashes will also be worn by bridemaids. A group of six bridemaids have chosen Suéde-colored China silk for three dresses, and heliotrope silk for the other three. Pretty dresses of white nuns’ veiling with full vests of Alençon lace have revers of white moiré, and moiré straps fastened by gold buckles; with these are stringless bonnets of lace, with gold quills thrust through a large bow of white moiré ribbon; the bouquets are of blushroses and maidenhair ferns. A pretty and simple dress for a maid of honor, or for several bridemaids, is of white satin surah, with a very full short skirt, shirred at the top, and not trimmed otherwise. The full gathered waist has a sash of wide moiré ribbon tied behind, and the bouquet worn in the corsage is of yellow roses. A short tulle veil falls just below the waist. Bride

maids wear tan-colored Suède gloves, with slippers of the same tan kid, and stockings to

match; these complete dresses of any color as well as white toilettes.

The BRIDE's TRAVELLING DRESS.

The going-away gowns made for brides by English tailors are of steel gray, or London smoke, or fawn-colored faced-cloth trimmed with oxidized silver braid in clusters, and on the vest, collar, and cuffs, in ways similar to those illustrated in Bazar No. 38, Vol. XX. A braided coat is made of the same cloth, and the bonnet or small round hat has the erown of the cloth with rows of pinked edges, or else is braided in rows, and the brim is made of changeable velvet in which red or blue is shot across a gray ground; the trimming is an Alsacian bow of very wide watered ribbon with two quills thrust through it. Round hats are more used than bonnets with travelling suits, and may be of felt the color of the dress, trimmed with velvet or with plaid moiré ribbon. Gray serge combined with velvet-striped serge is used when cloth gowns are thought too heavy. Brides who avoid all appearance of bridehood choose gowns of the striped tweeds in half-inch stripes of brown, blue, and olive, or other dark combinations, and make them up with pinked leaf-point edges that rest upon wide velvet ribbon as a finish for the drapery and the lower skirt. The stripes pass around the figure in the skirt and its draperies, and are taken lengthwise or diagonally in the basque.

0THER DRESSES OF THE TROUSSEAU.

Carriage, visiting, and church dresses for the bride are combinations of velvet with moiré in the gray-blue Gobelin shades, or of serpent green, or else of the dull red acajou, or mahogany, similar to the terra-cotta shades of two years ago, but with more brown tints. The moiré forms the lower skirt, made very full and plain, or else in large loose pleats with shirring on the hips, and sometimes gathered on cords half-way between the hips and foot. The velvet drapery is very long and full, but is given a slender effect by being confined to the front and the back without covering the sides. The velvet basque has a vest of the moiré, with bead ornaments on revers of plain repped silk. Dresses similarly made are entirely of velvet, while other combinations liave faille française for the basque and drapery, with a vest and plain lower skirt of velvet or of plush. Cloth dresses are also made up with velvet or plush skirts; this combination is a compromise between the severe tailor gowns entirely of cloth and the elaborate velvet and moiré dresses, and is preferred by many for church and visiting dresses. The cloth

dresses may have a cloth jacket or a short braid

ed cloth cloak to complete them for the street; with velvet and moiré or faille combinations the short wrap is of velvet trimmed with bead embroidery, fringe, and fur. For simpler house dresses cashmere remains the favorite material, inade up with a shirred basque simply finished with velvet collar, revers, and cuffs. For a trained dinner dress faille française or Bengaline in one of the darket shades of old-rose is a tasteful choice, becoiling alike to dark and fair complexions. If a rich black toilette is desired, modistes commend black moiré that has stripes and balls of satin, made with full front drapery of a new black lace that has the large round meshes of Brussels net with large rose figures and scallops like those of Spanish lace. Jet galloon is on the corsage, a point of jetted met is down one side of the skirt, and there are six graduated palms of jet on the other side set on two large box pleats that extend from the belt to the foot. A gayer black dress has the lower skirt of black moiré with wide stripes of Scotch plaid satin; the basque and long drapery of French faille or of Bengaline have revers and facings of the bright Scotch stripe. AUTUMN GLOWES.

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make ugly ridges on the hands as the rougher hand-stitching does. Heavy dressed kid gloves of the same design, to wear with tailor gowns, are made in English fashion, with lapped “drawn seams” sewed as harness is sewed, to show one light edge of the leather. Gray, black, and mode or drab shades are shown in both buttoned and loose winter gloves, but the tan-colored veloutine, or undressed kid gloves, still make up the bulk of the importations. Evening gloves of very light tan undressed kid are worn long enough to meet the sleeves, but are smoother on the arms than formerly; to keep them smooth a simple plan is to slit them near the top and pass an elastic band through the slits and around the arm, turning down the top of the glove (as for a hem) to hide the elastic. Merchants keep extra skins matching these gloves in evening tan shades for making slippers, which we have already said are worn with Suede-colored silk stockings. The sac gloves, cut very full, without a slit at the wrist, are made of dark pliable kid, and are worn very large as négligé gloves that are easily put off and on. Men's gloves are cut in the same way, but are shorter than those for ladies, and are liked for the country, for driving, etc. As a rule, all gloves are worn more easy-fitting and larger than they formerly were. , Separate gauntlets of stiff kid are imported to be added to English driving gloves of stitched kid that come in yellowish-tam, black, and white; these are used by equestriennes. Black undressed kid gloves are worn by those dressing in mourning, the glazed kid being now seldom seen. For information received thanks are due Mrs. M. A. Connelly; and Messrs. ARNOLD, CoNSTABLE, & Co.; JAMEs McCREERY & Co.; Lord & TAYLoR; LE BouTILLIER BROTHERs; and STERN BROTHERS.

PERSONAL.

MRS, FRELINGHUYSEN, widow of the Senator, is building a colonial mansion at Lenox. Thé marked feature of this house will be the diningroom, with an oblong window designed by Miss FRELINGHUYSEN, which will have the effect of a frame, the landscape outside being the picture. –Colonel E. B. DICKENsoN, President of the New York State Stenographers' Association, regards PHILLIPS BROOKS as the fastest speaker in this country, if not in the world. No one stenographer can report him accurately, and the only way he can be reported with any degree of Satisfaction is by two experts who compare their notes after they have written them out. Mr. BEEgheh, he says, was an easy man to re. port. ... He considers ordinary speakers who haven't an idea in their heads and yet think they must speak as giving the hardest work to Stenographers. -ELAINE GoonALE is lecturing in the East, during her vacation, on the Indian question. Miss. GoodALE began her career as a poetic prodigy in connection with her sister. She has not written much poetry of late, but has contributed some very interesting prose to the columns of the daily press of New York. For Some years past she has lived in Dakota, devoting herself to teaching Indian girls how to take care of themselves as other girls do; that is, how to sew, to make bread, and to carry on simple remunerative industries. --Mr. E. H. Johnson, the president of the Edison Electric Light Company, has a house at Greenwich, Connecticut, built on a hill, from which may be had an extended view of Long Island Sound. Electricity is the great feature of the place, it being Mr. Johnson's intention to put it to every possible use. It lights the house and grounds, the tennis-court being furnished with sunken lamps, so that the light does not flash in the players' eyes; it works an orgun, runs a fountain, opens gates, regulates the temperature, pumps the water, and does other services about the house and grounds. -Fit ANR MILLET, the artist, is living in the little village of Broadway, about two hours out of London. Mr. MILLET is a writer as well as a painter, and has the good fortune to be able to illustrate his own articles. He was a very successful war correspondent at one time, and now lie is quite as successful an artist. —The late Mrs. J. R. VINCENT, of Boston, stood in the same relation to the theatre-going people of that city that Mrs. G. H. GILBEitt, of Daly's, occupies in New York. For thirty-five years slie was a member of the Boston Museum Company. She was not only popular among her audience, but was a great favorite with her fellow-actors. . She used to tell amusing stories of the late E. A. SOTHERN, who was always joking, and who would telegraph her from all parts of the country saying that he had engaged certain theatres at fabulous prices for her. In that way, she said, she got a reputation for wealth which she did not deserve. —A well-known belle of New Orleans has a passion for Brazilian bugs, which are supposed to live on air. She wears them in her hair and about her dress, not only in private, but in public. Sometimes, when in a hurry to get home, she will patronize the democratic street-car, where she is the observed of all the passengers on account of the bugs crawling over her garments. These bugs do not roam at will; they

can go a certain distance and no farther, for they

are held by a fine gold chain which is pinned to her dress. Some years ago this was a popular freak of fashion, and there is a possibility of its being revived. —NELLIE GRANT SARtoris lives in Southampton, England. Her home stands near the river, and is as comfortable and as picturesque as most English homes are. . The house is two centuries old, and has been added to by each generation. Besides this country house, her father-in-law has iven her a house in London. She is very comfortably fixed as far as mouey, und houses go. Mrs. SARToltis is the mother of three children; the oldest, a boy, is ten, and the youngest, a girl, is six. —Around the grounds of the WINANS mansion in Baltimore is a liigh stone wall, and it is said that this wall was erected by Mr. WINANS because, many years ago, when the garden was first built, he filled it with statues copied from the antique, and opened it to the public. The nude in art was not regarded with as liberal and artistic an eye in those days as it is to-day, and the people of Baltimore applied to the City Council to liave the statues removed. The Council, of course, paid no attention to this petition, but Mr. WiNANs was so enraged by it that he surrounded his garden with a wall so high that no one could see over it. —Among the ornaments on the supper table at the VANDERBILT reception given recently in Newport was a large owl on a perch. This owl was composed of 750 pieces of sugar and almonds, the eyes alone containing 60 pieces. A chain of confectionery, made in imitation of silver, held the bird to his perch. Another ornament was a large beelive to which sugar bees clung. It is said that $10,000 will not pay the expenses of this ball. —R. D. SEARS is still the champion tennis player. He is an amiable-looking, fair-complexioned young man, twenty-six years of age, rather short and stout, and wears glasses. He does not look an athlete until he begins to cliase the ball about the field, and then by his dexterity and lightness of foot he shows his understanding of the game and his mastery, of it. Tennis is still popular, but croquet is being revived, and next year croquet tournaments will probably vie with those of the tennis-court. —Mrs. HENRY CLEws, wife of the banker, has just added a music-room to her Newport house. This room is forty-two feet long and thirty-one feet wide, and is oval in shape. It is intended to be used as a dancing-room also, and the main seats are recessed in the four corners, so as to leave as much floor room as possible. The oval idea has been carried out in the ceiling, which begins with one large coye, and ends with a smaller cove and a ceiling light. The two coves are separated from each other by a row of perforated panels, which act as ventilators. A row of gas jets on the ceiling lights the room. The wood-work is finished in enamelled white and gold. The walls are plainly tinted, and the two coves are covered with appropriate designs. The end of the room which opens on the conservatory has a gallery built over it for the musicians.

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