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which country, for so long, because of the Maximilian episode, Mexico held no diplomatic intercourse, it is inferred that it would not now be, as once it was, a fauz pas to place the Austrian and Mexican ministers, on official occasions, or at a banquet, in close juxtaposition in Washington, and the Austrian minister could not be invited to the Mexican legation, and vice versa. Very many points must be considered when mixing up members of the diplomatio corps on occasions of ceremony, whether official or social. As indicated above, the accredited representatives of nations which are not holding diplomatic intercourse with each other must not receive each other officially even when on neutral ground in the capital of a nation friendly to the government each represents, though they may know each other and be friendly privately outside their official residences. Again, exception has been taken when the wife of a minister representing a nation governed by a king or emperor has assigned her as escort at a state dinner at the White House a minister from a republic, and an instance of this caused a fair lady whose lot fell as above intimated to pout, and later to complain as to her treatment, when the annual diplomatic dinner was given a winter or two ago at the Executive Mansion. She had no objection to her partner, except that he being from a republic, and her husband from a kingdom, she did not consider his rank high enough to be her escort to table in the President's house. But the seating of guests on such occasions is arranged according to the length of time each minister has been accredited here, he who has served longest in the same capacity in Washington taking the highest rank, and the wives of the ministers are given places, as between themselves, in strict accordance with those assigned their husbands. This rule as to seniority in the diplomatic corps giving precedence is the same which obtains in all European courts, being the only one which can give no offence because of a seeming exaltation of one ambassador or minister above another of the same grade, or of one nation over another.

SOME REMINISCENCES OF MIR.S. D. M. CRAIK.

“QAY of me only that I am sixty years old, and have been writing novels for forty years,” wrote Mrs. Craik a year ago, when there was a question of preparing some sketch of her literary life. This restriction she afterward removed; and indeed it would be a loss, now that she is gone, if some record of her strong and sweet character and dignified yet kindly presence were not made by those who knew her and were counted among her friends. I first saw Mrs. Craik one sunshine-and-shower autumn day seven years ago, when I had been asked to her house, and on the way there from the station passed a group of young girls, among whom a stately gray-haired woman attracted my attention. The group were waiting under a tree by the roadside for a slight shower to be over, and presently, when I had reached the house and the sky had cleared, I found on her arrival that my hostess was the same lady who had so attracted me as I passed by. The people with her were a group of shopgirls from “Waterloo House,” London, where she was accustomed to make her purchases. It was her pleasant habit once a year or oftener to make a garden party on a Saturday half-holiday for a number of these young people. She was assisted in this kindly task by her husband's sister, Miss Georgiana M. Craik, also known as a writer and as a collaborator with Mrs. Craik in some of her children's stories, and it was a pleasant sight to see these two ladies so cordially and hospitably receiving their happy guests. It made an agreeable introduction to a delightful friendship, and was a revelation of the real woman who was behind the writer of her books. There never was a more charming hostess than Mrs. Craik in her own home. She was tall and stately in carriage, with a winning smile and a frank and quiet manner which gave one the best kind of welcome; and her silver gray hair crowned the comfortable age of a woman who had used her years, one could see and feel, always to the best purposes. Somehow it always seemed to me as though here was the Dinah of Adam Bede, who had gone on living and devel: oping after the novel stopped. When once I said this to her, she told me that one or two

others had said the same of her, and that indeed she had come from a part of the country not far from Dinah Morris's home, where Dinah was a usual name. She was born in Staffordshire, at Stoke-on-Trent, in 1826, the daughter of a clergyman, who died when she was quite young, and was soon after followed by his widow. At her death the small annuity on which the family had depended ceased, and the young girl, Dinah Maria Mulock, was left to take care of two brothers, whom she educated with the earnings from her pen. These are details which I never heard from her, but give on the authority of printed statements, though what I have heard her say as to her early life is in line with them. She had a strong sense of being born a gentlewoman, and felt, as I remember she said once, that no matter what reverses or what adversity might come to her, that feeling would always give her stay and standard. It was this spirit of her own life which she afterward wrote into John Halifax, Gentleman. The first work she did was in the line of short stories, and she was happy in at once finding an

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of her fame, her fifth novel, was published. It

is an interesting feature of her novels that they were all built upon some principle or thought of wholesome bearing which she desired to illustrate, and John Halifar, Gentleman, was intended to set forth that feeling of gentlehood under all circumstances which had been so strong a part of her own life. This she once told me in so many words. Afterward she had sought to collect material which should illustrate this thought, and thus in searching through the chronicles of the time which she had chosen she came upon the incident of the riot, which makes so strong a point in the book, and so lives in the memory of most of her readers. Such books as A Life for a Life, A Brave Lady, My Mother and I, and King Arthur illustrate very fully how she car

ried out in her novels this idea of a central purpose from which incidents and characters develop. She was a prolific writer, being the author of nineteen novels, eleven books for children, and as many books of travel and miscellaneous works, and three volumes of poems, in all over forty volumes. Last year her husband, with her co-operation, made a careful list of her books, which she sent me in one of her letters, and which I give below, adding one or two which have since appeared. Novels. The Ogilvies, 1849; Olive, 1850; The Head of the Family, 1851; Agatha's Husband, 1853; John Halifax, Gentleman, 1857: A Life for a Life, 1859; Mistress and Maid, 1863; Christian's Mistake, 1865; A Noble Life, 1866; Two Marriages, 1867; The Woman's Kingdom, 1869; A Brave Lady, 1870; Hannah, 1871; My Mother and I, 1874; The Laurel Bush, 1876; Young Mrs. Jardine, 1879; His Little Mother, 1881; Miss Tommy, 1884; King Arthur, 1886. Miscellaneous Works.-Avillion and other Tales, 1853; Nothing New, 1857; A Woman's Thoughts

On the title-page of most of her books she was known as “the author of John Halifax, Gentle. man,” which was usually supposed to be the result of a prejudice against the use of her own name in literature. It was, however, quite an accident, coming from the desire of her publisher, soon after John Halifax, Gentleman, had made so great a success, to utilize that success in selling her later books, and once she adopted the habit she adhered to it. Her novels, and perhaps her other writings, have a wider circle of readers in America than England, although in both countries the manfulness and sweetness of her books have given her thousands of devoted readers. She took much interest in travel, and especially in the Irish journey of last year, which is the subject of a book yet to be published, with illustrations from her young friend Mr. Noel Paton. Her relations with her juniors, as in this instance, were very sweet and motherly, and this friendly feeling for others comes out strongly in her poems, which have a sweetly touching sympathy always in them. The most interesting of all, perhaps, is that poem which is put first in the collected edition, “Philip my King,” in which “the large

about Woman, 1858; Studies from Life, 1861; The Unkind Word and other Stories, 1870; Fair France, 1872; Sermons out of Church, 1875; A Legacy, being the Life and Remains of John Martin, Schoolmaster and Postman, 1878; Plain Speaking, 1882; An Unsentimental Journey through Cornwall, 1884; About Money and other Things, 1886; An Unknown Country, 1887. Poetry.—Poems, 1859, expanded into Thirty Years' Poems, New and Old, 1881, and Children's Poetry, 1881; Songs of Our Youth, 1875. Children's Books.-Alice Learmont, a Fairy Tale, 1852; How to Win Love, or Rhoda’s Lesson, 1848; Cola Monti, 1849; A Hero, 1853; Bread upon the Waters, 1852; The Little Lychetts, 1855; Michael the Miner, 1846; Our Year, 1862; Little Sunshine's Holiday, 1875; Adveno of a Brownie, 1872; The Little Lame Prince, 1874. She also prepared The Fairy Book and Is it True? two volumes of old fairy tales rendered anew, translated Mme. Guizot DeWitt's A French Country Family, Motherless, and An Only Sister, and edited the series of books for girls,

brown eyes” were those of the little child who was afterward to be the blind poet, Philip Bourke Marston. All her work showed a combination of manly strength and feminine tenderness which made it as acceptable to men as to women. In 1864 her literary work received the appreciation of a pension from the Civil List, and the next year her personal life was crowned by her marriage to Mr. George Lillie Craik, the son, I think, of the Scotch writer of that name, and a relative of the author of Craik's English Literature. Mr. Craik himself is now a partner in the publishing house of Macmillan & Co., and is well known in the literary world of London. He was somewhat younger than his wife, but the marriage was a most happy one, as she once had occasion to say to another lady who came to her in regard to a marriage under similar conditions. The home which Mr. and Mrs. Craik built for themselves was one of the most charming about London, across “ the lovely Kentish meadows,” to the southeast, at Shortlands, Kent. It stood in the pleasant English country, with a delightful garden stretching out from it, and outside the house toward the garden was a little recess called “Dorothy's Parlor,” where Mrs. Craik was very fond of taking her work or her writing on a summer's day. It was named for the little daughter whom they had adopted years ago, having no children of their own, and who was the sunshine of the house up to the time of her foster - mother's death. Within the recess was the Latin motto, “Deus haec otia fecit” (God made this rest), which Mrs. Craik once told me she had long ago selected as the motto which she would wish to build into a home of her own, should it ever be given to her to make one. Within the house there was one charming room which served for library, music-room, and parlor, filled with books and choice pictures, but chiefly beautiful because of the presence of its mistress, as she brought her work-basket out for a quiet talk with a friend. Over the mantel of the pleasant dining-room was the motto, “East or West, Hame is best,” which pleasantly gave the spirit in which Mrs. Craik lived in her home, for she used to say in later years that home-keeping was more to her than storywriting, and she often got only an hour or so a week for her pen. Besides this work with her pen, Mrs. Craik was known in many quarters for the practical interest which she took in all good works. Last year she distributed the prizes at the Working Girls’ College in London, and in many such enterprises she had a keen and loving interest. Most especially did her heart go out toward an institution in her own neighborhood, the Royal Normal College for the Blind, at Upper Norwood, of Mr. Campbell, of whose life she once wrote a most interesting sketch. The pluck and bravery of this blind man, who had worked out into success a great plan for the betterment of the condition of his fellow-sufferers, and who climbed Mont Blanc to show that a blind man could do some things as well as others, appealed strongly to her, and she was also interested in the fact that he was an American: America and Americans had always a large share in her heart. To a great circle of readers all over the English-speaking world the news of her death will come with a sense of personal loss for the woman shown through her books; but what shall be said of the sorrow of those who had come to know her and love her as a personal friend? R. R. BowkER.

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T has often been said that the man who first ate a raw oyster must have been not only brave, but hungry, and although there are few of us who have been equally brave in tasting new dishes, we think it safe to say that there are many more who would have to be very hungry before eating broiled rattlesnake or baked buzzard, and yet those who have eaten broiled snake declare it to be, when properly cooked, excellent eating. A few winters ago, in Florida, I was invited to a feast in the wilderness, and ate heartily of a delicious roast of meat; on asking for a second plate I inquired what it was, and was told that it was roast wild-cat. Not for the whole State of Florida could I have eaten another mouthful, and yet my vis-à-vis exclaim. ed, “Wild-cat?—it is delicious!” How could he? I thought. Of course I was glad afterward that I had tasted wildcat, but I could not have felt any more uncomfortable for a while if they had told me that I had eaten part of the alligator I had seen brought in from the swamp that morning, or a pie made of the beautiful little chameleons that were to be found everywhere; and in fact I am not quite sure but that some of the tough black steaks that we had at the St. Augustine and Jacksonville hotels were not alligator steaks. However, every one to his taste; the Chinaman will tell you that mice are “very good eating,” the Frenchman that horse-flesh “is excellent,” the negro that possum and 'coon “am belicious,” the cannibal that nothing equals the flesh of his enemy, and so on. Although frog-spearing became a fashionable sport across the water last

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Summer, and was practised both by men and women, we hardly think that even hazel-wood cross-bows and silken cords will induce American girls to follow their French cousins in this rather questionable amusement; still, as there are recipes to be found for the serving of frogs' legs in some of the new cook books, it proves that it is not an unknown dish nor an unliked one, and for the benefit of those who affect something odd for the table the following suggestions for dishes and dinners are offered. There are several ways of preparing frogs' legs, the simplest being a salad; fried, with sauce tartare; patties of frogs' legs; and a plain fry. For the last, which is the simplest of all, skin, and boil for five minutes in salted water, then throw into cold water and drain; roll in cracker crumbs, and fry in hot fat. Those who visit Florida in the winter can indulge in

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palmetto cabbage, which is the tender bud of the tree, and prepared just as you would boil cabbage, not forgetting to change the water at least twice. It also makes an excellent pickle. We have heard it stated by those who have tried it that watermelon is vastly improved by pouring claret or champagne over it. Some time since the London Standard published two recipes which we think will serve as extreme examples in taste. They were for beetle paste and pickled grasshoppers; the latter is a New Zealand dish, but is none the less recommended. The beetles which are used are the common black ones. They should be soaked in vinegar for six hours, then dried in the sun for two hours; the outer shell can then be easily removed, leaving the flesh, which resembles a shrimp. Now mix with flour, butter, pepper, and salt into thick paste, and set in a cool oven for two hours. When cold serve with bread and butter. The grasshoppers should be steeped in salt or pork brine for two hours, then boiled in the brine for twenty minutes, then rinsed in lukewarm water, and remove the heads, legs, and wings (if any are left). They are now ready for the table, and should be eaten with crackers. A Chinese student tells us that locusts on toast is as fashionable a dish in northern China as quail on toast is in America, and we see no reason to doubt his assertion that they are delicious eating. To prepare them the locusts are thrown into a hot dry pot and covered. When they are dead a handful of salt is thrown in, and they are stirred until crisp; then serve on toast. They are said to resemble a salt herring in taste. One of the dainties of a Florida seaside hotel last winter was Frenched conch, and many a guest ate it and enjoyed it without knowing exactly what it was. It is the fish whose beautiful pink shells are made so much of in Florida, and it is good eating when properly cooked. It is usually fried in batter, or made into soup. An odd way of entertaining is to serve national dinners, such as a Swedish dinner, at which every dish has been prepared in Swedish fashion. One very important feature might be the use of black bread, which can only be obtained from a Swedish baker. Another Swe. dish dish is an omelet made with grated cheese, butter, and milk, and cooked in the dish in which it is served. A Scotch dinner consists of kail soup, kippered salmon, haggis, giblet pie, oat-cake, barley scone, and guid cauld water.

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NOTHING IS KNOWN TO SCIENCE AT ALL 1N comparable to the Curiouea Remedies in their marvellous properties of cleansing, purifying, and beautifying the skin, and in curing torturing, disfiguring, itching, scaly, and pimply diseases of the skin, scalp, and blood, with loss of hair. Curiouka, the great Skin Cure, and CUTroup A So AP, an exquisite Skin Beautifier, prepared from it, externally, and Curiouka Resolvest, the new Blood Purifier, internally, are a positive cure for every form of skin and blood disease, from pimples to scrofula. CUTicuna REMEpips are absolutely pure, and the only infallible skin beautifiers and blood purifiers. Sold everywhere. Price, CUTLouis A, 50c.; RFsoilvent, $1; So AP, 25c. Prepared by the Potter: DBug AND CHEMICA1, Co., Boston, Mass. or Send for “How to Cure Skin Diseases.”

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PARKER'S

With it you can stamp more than

1000

PATTERN.S.

STAMPINs. OUTFIT

Exceeds in value all other outfits,

$1.O.O.

This outfit contains book teaching every known method of stamping, price 25 cents: Box Best Powder and Pad, 15 cts. ; Materials for Indelible Stamping on Plush, Felt, etc., 15 cts. ; Materials and Instruction for . Parker's New Method (copyrighted), No Paint, No Powder, No Daub, 50 cents;

Sent anywhere hymall, prepaid.

New 1888 Catalogue (showing all the new stamping

atterns), 10 cents; and Illustrated Wholesale

rice List of Embroidery Materials, Infant's Wardrobes, Corsets, Jewelry, and everything ladies need.

of SAVE MONEY BY BUYING AT WHOLESALE. -35

PARKER’s LAST INVENTION.

A SET OF DESIGNING PATTERN.S.—With this set any one can design thousands of beautiful pieces for Embroidery, Tinsel Work, Painting, etc. No exFo needed—a child can do it. An Illustrated

ook shows how to make patterns to fill any space; all the flowers used in embroidery represented. Every one who does stamping wants a set, which can be had only with this outfit. This outfit also contains TWO HUNDRED or more Stamping Patterns ready for use. The following being only a partial list: – Splasher Design, 22 in., 50 cents;

COUPON FOR ONE DOLLAR.

In addition to all these and many other patterns we enclose a Coupon good for $1 worth of patterns of your own selection chosen from our catalogue.

Everything enumerated above for One Dollar.

THE MODERN PRISGILLA.

Monthly, 50 cts. per year. Descriptions of new fancy work appear every month; all directions for knitting or cro

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* Send stamp

Roses, 12 in., and Daisies, 12 in., for scarf or tidies, 25 cents each; Wide Tinsel Design, 12 in., 25 cents; Strips of Scallops for Flannels, wide and narrow, 30 cts.; Braiding Patterns 10 cents; Splash! Splash! “Good Night,” and “Good Morning,” for pillow shams, two fine outline designs for tidies, 6x8, 50 cts.; Tray Cloth Set, 50 cts.: Teapot, Sugar, Cream, Cup and Saucer, etc.; Pond Lilies, 9x12, 25 cts.; 2 Alphabets, $1.00; 2 Sets Numbers, 30 cts.; Patterns of Golden Rod, Sumac, Daisies, Roses, &c., Tinseland Outline Patterns, Disks, Crescents, &c.

THE MODERN PRISCILLA.

The Modern Priscilla (the only practical fancy work journal in America), by arrangement with the uublishers, will also be sent free for one year

f. E. PARKER, iWNN MAss.

SAVE MONEY. Embroidery Material, Infant's Goods, Kid Gloves, Corsets, Laces, Ruchings, etc., at WHOLESALE PRICES Sent anywhere by mail, Post AGE ALWAYS PREPAID. 25 Skeins Embroidery Silk, 11 cents. Box of Waste Embroidery Silk, worth 40 cents, for only 21 cents. Felt Tidies, all stamped, 10 cents. Linen

Get up a Club.

for pre

F&NLos mium list. Club rate is now Splashers, all stamped, 18 cts. -- ~ 25 cts, a year, or 5 for $1. Felt Table Scarfs, 18x50, all Devoted exclusively to E-S- Get 4 subscribers and have stamped, 48 eents. Ball Tin

LADIES” FANCY-WORR.

your own free.
–5 Priscilla Pub, Co., Lynn, Mass

Address sel, 8 cents.

T. E. Parker, Lynn, Mass.

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HIDLEY'S,

Grand St., NEW YOrk.

L0W PRICES

Throughout the Entire Establishment for Seasonable and Desirable Novelties such as will fully repay a visit.

DRESS G00DS.

Full Assortment High-Class Novelties.

44-INCH ALL-WOOL AND SILK FRENCH VICTORIA STRIPEDSUITINGS at $1.25. Plain, to combine, $1.00 yard. 44-INCH ALL-WOOL AND SILK TWO-TONED NOVELTY COMBINATION SUITINGS at $1.65 yard. SELF-COLORED BIAS, Stripes to Match, at $1.28 a yard. 42-INCH FINE IMPORTED STRIPED CAMELSHAIR COMBINATION at $1.00; worth $1.50. 42-INCH ALL-WOOL IMPORTED STRIPE AND PLAID NOVELTY SUITINGS at 74c.; worth $1.00. 100 STYLES ALL-WOOL FANCY SUITINGS IN CHECKS, STRIPES, AND PLAIDS, at 41c. a yard; worth 65c. 36-INCH ALL-W0OL DRESS FLANNELS, 39c. a yard. 50-INCH ALL-W0OL FLANNEL CLOTHS, 49c. a yard. 50-INCH ALL-WOOL FANCYCLOTHS, 75c. a yard. 50-INCH ALL-WOOL TRICOTS, 89c. a yard. 50-INCH ALL-WOOL COSTUME CLOTHS, 9Sc. a yard. 50-INCH ALL-WOOL FRENCH CLOTHS, $1.75 a yard.

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In our upholstery department we will show this fall the largest assortment of Chenille Portières yet shown by any retail house. Oriental Chenille Portière Curtains, 50 inches wide, 9 feet 9 long, beautiful designs, rich soft colorings, both sides alike, worth $15.00...... per pair $9.98 Chenille Table-Covers, size 6–4, both sides aliko, Persian designs, rich colorings,worth $3.50...each $2.25 Lace Curtains, Brussels lace effects, Ecru and white, 3% long, worth $5.00 per window...... .... $2.98 Smyrna Rugs, 18x36, best quality, new goods and colorings, worth $1.50...................... each 99¢. New Catalogue, now ready, mailed free. Mail orders thoroughly executed.

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18th St., 19th St., 6th Avenue

(18th St. Station Elevated Road), NIEW YORIX.

LADIES”

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Unusual facilities for making to order

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The Lablache Face Powder, sodelicate, so dainty and refined, is a most exquisite toilet preparation. It is othe admiration of thousands of loveoly American women who owe their beauty to its constant use. It will add brilliancy to a maiden's charms, and make the complexion as soft, transparent, and pure as an infant's. - - To the fair sex who pride themso seives on having the most delicate Koo. 6; skins, this toilet powder is becomo ing distinguished, and is found Foo" among other fashionable surroundings upon the toilet tables of the elite. The Lablache Face Powder is for sale by all druggists, or will be mailed to any address on receipt of 25 2-cent stamps. BEN. LEV.Y. & CO., French Perfumers, and sole proprietors, 34 West Street, Boston, Mass.

For

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E P P S 'S

CRATEFUL–COMFORTING.

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MADE WITH BOILING MILK.
Pillows and Turk-

Balsam Fir"...".

Samples and particulars of each for two 2c, stamps. The HYDE PARK CO., Hyde Park, Mass.

\\\\\\\\\Sows Cloak Dep’t.

To meet a competition as keen as that which prevails in this Metropolis, there is a tendency among some merchants to put lower grades of cloth, unreliable materials, poorer work and finis!' into their garments; in short, to sacrifice every. thing that can possibly make these garments of real value to the wearer, save mere appearance while new, for the sake of quoting a low price. We have watchfully guarded ourselves from falling into this error, and while we are determined that our prices shall always he the lowest, we are equally as determined that it shall not be at the expense of either the wear or appearance or usefulness of the garment. The slatering response which was accorded to our last advertisement has renewed our efforts to again purchase a novelty in Ladies' fine and heavy black Jersey Cloth Jackets, double breasted, buttoned diagonally with large crochet buttons,

high standing collars, double seams, and bound with

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LADIEs who are unable to examine our stock of these goods personally, would find it to their advantage to correspond with us. The most complete information furnished, and careful attention given to special orders.

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HERE's A Little se A-side picture the MEANING AND HERE IS A LITTLE SOCIAL SKETCH WHICH WE ARE THIS Is A LITTLE DOMESTIC PICTURE which A NY OF WHICH EVERY TRUE SPORTSMAN WILL DETECT VERY SURE EVERY LADY WILL DIVINE IN A MOMENT. MA RRI ED MAN CAN INTER PRET IN LESS THAN FIETEEN At once. SE CONDS.

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Gown Trotter?”
Soltvant (on her return). “Mrs. Trotter sends her regrets, and has instructed
mo to say that owing to her natural sensitiveness to publicity, she will not be
able to see you for more than a few moments, Walk in, please.”
-
When Mattie R–, a little Baltimore girl, was told by her mamma that Adam
and Eve were driven out of the Garden of Eden, she innocently asked, “Did
they go in a phaeton or a carriage, mamma 7"
-
BUSINESS QUIET.
Lady (to drug clerk), “A two-cent stamp, please.”
!CLook (absent-minded), “Yes, madam. Will you take it with you or have it

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Mary was sent away from the dinner-table because she misbehaved, and told to go upstairs and tell nurse to put her to bed. The family coming in from dinner a half-hour later, found her threading her way among the parlor chairs and tables in most complicated figures. “Mary 1" o her mother, “didn't I tell you to go upstairs 7" Mary looked up placidly. “Yes, 'm. I'm going; I'm on my way now.” -

There was a certain character in one of our country towns who was noted more for the various means to which he resorted to earn a living than for his veracity. At one time it, happened that he was peddling fish, and his cry summoned a very particular old o to the side of the wagon. - “Are these fish fresh 7” she asked, viewing the finny representatives with sus)101011. pl. Yes, 'm ; caught this very mornin’,” was the reply. “Are you sure?" she continued, giving the load sundry pokes. “They all seem to be dead.” “Dead?” echoed the vender—“dead? Yes, 'm, they are dead. They winz so lively when I left home that I had ter kill 'em to keep 'em from jumpin' outer ther

wagon.”

Mrs. Partington, who is a great sufferer from toothache, declares, that she almost wishes she had been born without any teeth.

- - A WESTERN DELICACY AN ACCOMPLISHED CANINE. Customko (to Nevada hotel proprietor). “What have you got in the way of DOG-FANCIER. “I Doi, E You Dot Dog vos on- “UNT ven I ZAY IN Dortch, “GEHST pu NAus! game, landlord 7" TELEGENT. HE CAN SHPEAK Two LANGUAGES : NOW I HE schoost yump UNT RUN, HoNEST, I. Bolo Pot LAN plotl (rubbing his hands appetizingly). “Well, sir, I can get you up a zAY IN ENGLISH, ‘Coo ME HERE, YAck, UNT DARE DIs DoG Vos Ton K-TIED, UR HE COULD SHPEAK LIKE ANY couple of nice grasshoppers on toast.” Pon E,” UNT HE schoosT coomE AT DE VORT.” PERSON.”

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MERE SCOLDING II AD NO EFFECT. JUSTLY INDIGNANT. MISTRESS. “Why CAN'T You REMEMBER, BRIDGET, when I TELL You A Thous AND 110STESS, “ THAT was A chARMING coyi position, HERR Sweitzei. W. As IT on ITIMEs to I Do N'T Like ALways To BE sco L. DING You For For GETTING." GINAL ** AMIABLE BUT FORGETFUL"DOMESTIC. “FAITH, MUM, You Do N'T scold. It's QUITE HERR SWEITZEI (who has been playing one of Chopin's most famous concertos amid general PLEAs ANt You ARE, MUM. The LAST LADY I LIVED wild used To come ouT INTo THE and well-sustained conversation). “OHF IT vos Nod MoRE or ichinals DEN Dot GOMPLL

KITCHEN AND STAMP HER FEET AND THROW THINGS AT ME.” MENT I would IT TEAR oop I"

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